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VC++ 2003 compile time slower than VC++ 6.0

i experience slower compile times with VC++ 2003 compared to VC+6.0.
Anyone experiencing the same?
Should that be expected?
This ineed matters, when total compilation time is > 1h and you have to wait
10-50% longer...

Nov 17 '05 #1
5 1458
Michael wrote:
i experience slower compile times with VC++ 2003 compared to VC+6.0.
Anyone experiencing the same?
Should that be expected?
This ineed matters, when total compilation time is > 1h and you have to wait
10-50% longer...


I think the idea is that you are likely to have a build computer up to
5X as fast as that which was available when VC6 was first released (in
1998) so a 50% increase in compile times shouldn't affect you too much.
The improvements in the VC7.1 compiler (in terms of conformance,
optimization, possibly flexibility and maintainability , etc.) probably
account for the slower compiles.

Some switches obviously increase compile times (for example, whole
program optimization).

Tom
Nov 17 '05 #2
>> i experience slower compile times with VC++ 2003 compared to VC+6.0.
Anyone experiencing the same?

Could you give an example you are seeing this. Sometimes, there might be
some features or switches you are using which cause the slowdown.
Mostly they have workarounds too.
Thanks,
Kapil

"Tom Widmer" <to********@hot mail.com> wrote in message
news:%2******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP12.phx.gbl. .. Michael wrote:
i experience slower compile times with VC++ 2003 compared to VC+6.0.
Anyone experiencing the same?
Should that be expected?
This ineed matters, when total compilation time is > 1h and you have to
wait 10-50% longer...


I think the idea is that you are likely to have a build computer up to 5X
as fast as that which was available when VC6 was first released (in 1998)
so a 50% increase in compile times shouldn't affect you too much. The
improvements in the VC7.1 compiler (in terms of conformance, optimization,
possibly flexibility and maintainability , etc.) probably account for the
slower compiles.

Some switches obviously increase compile times (for example, whole program
optimization).

Tom

Nov 17 '05 #3
Of course the build computers (> 10 infact) are much faster, but
unfortunately the software grew faster...
We do not use whole program optimization.
As we still have projects using VC++6 the slower compile times catch
attention easily.
I wonder if VC++2005 get better or worse (even more conformance and
optimizations)

"Tom Widmer" wrote:
Michael wrote:
i experience slower compile times with VC++ 2003 compared to VC+6.0.
Anyone experiencing the same?
Should that be expected?
This ineed matters, when total compilation time is > 1h and you have to wait
10-50% longer...


I think the idea is that you are likely to have a build computer up to
5X as fast as that which was available when VC6 was first released (in
1998) so a 50% increase in compile times shouldn't affect you too much.
The improvements in the VC7.1 compiler (in terms of conformance,
optimization, possibly flexibility and maintainability , etc.) probably
account for the slower compiles.

Some switches obviously increase compile times (for example, whole
program optimization).

Tom

Nov 17 '05 #4
For example (C code) i measured (with P4 1,5Ghz, 1GB) 16% longer compile time
for Active Perl v5.8.6 Build 811 with 2003 as with 6.0. (makefile unmodified)

ACE (Adaptive Communication Environment which consists of many C++
templates) was even 50% slower. With a custom (proprietary) makefile compiler
switches are the same for 6.0 and 2003 :
-nologo -MD -O2 -Z7 -GR -GX -G5 -X -GF -EHa -Od -Og -Os -Oy -Ob1 -Gs -Gy -c
-W4
"Kapil Khosla [MSFT]" wrote:
i experience slower compile times with VC++ 2003 compared to VC+6.0.
Anyone experiencing the same?


Could you give an example you are seeing this. Sometimes, there might be
some features or switches you are using which cause the slowdown.
Mostly they have workarounds too.
Thanks,
Kapil

"Tom Widmer" <to********@hot mail.com> wrote in message
news:%2******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP12.phx.gbl. ..
Michael wrote:
i experience slower compile times with VC++ 2003 compared to VC+6.0.
Anyone experiencing the same?
Should that be expected?
This ineed matters, when total compilation time is > 1h and you have to
wait 10-50% longer...


I think the idea is that you are likely to have a build computer up to 5X
as fast as that which was available when VC6 was first released (in 1998)
so a 50% increase in compile times shouldn't affect you too much. The
improvements in the VC7.1 compiler (in terms of conformance, optimization,
possibly flexibility and maintainability , etc.) probably account for the
slower compiles.

Some switches obviously increase compile times (for example, whole program
optimization).

Tom


Nov 17 '05 #5
Michael wrote:
Of course the build computers (> 10 infact) are much faster, but
unfortunately the software grew faster...
We do not use whole program optimization.
As we still have projects using VC++6 the slower compile times catch
attention easily.
I wonder if VC++2005 get better or worse (even more conformance and
optimizations)


I haven't timed it, but my seat-of-the-pants estimate is "about the same".

-cd
Nov 17 '05 #6

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