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(X)HTML, Javascript and Frames

P: n/a
Hi,

I'm kind of new in using Javascript and wonder what are the pro's and
con's for using frames as a means to navigate and/of split the 'screen'
in a functional way? And are there alternatives?

Thanks!

Jan 27 '06 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
Linvo wrote:
Hi,

I'm kind of new in using Javascript and wonder what are the pro's and
con's for using frames as a means to navigate and/of split the 'screen'
in a functional way? And are there alternatives?


http://www.apptools.com/rants/framesevil.php

Mick
Jan 27 '06 #2

P: n/a

Linvo wrote:
Hi,

I'm kind of new in using Javascript and wonder what are the pro's and
con's for using frames as a means to navigate and/of split the 'screen'
in a functional way? And are there alternatives?

Thanks!


Frames Pro:

1. Anything static can be visible all the time, e.g., navigation,
company logos, banner, etc.

Frames Con:

1. Search engines may not be able to properly spider a framed site.
2. Bookmarking a page generally don't work. (but there are
workarounds)
3. Not all browsers support frames (not sure how true this is anymore)
4. Sometimes, you also need to make a non-framed version, thus raising
maintenance

Alternative:

1. You can use <iframe>.

Jan 27 '06 #3

P: n/a
web.dev wrote:
[...]
Frames Con:

1. Search engines may not be able to properly spider a framed site.
2. Bookmarking a page generally don't work. (but there are
workarounds)
3. Not all browsers support frames (not sure how true this is anymore)
4. Sometimes, you also need to make a non-framed version, thus raising
maintenance

Alternative:

1. You can use <iframe>.


The same cons apply to the `iframe' element, so it is not an alternative.
In fact, there a user agents that support the `frame' element but not the
`iframe' element, so that introduces one more con compared to `frame'.
PointedEars
Jan 28 '06 #4

P: n/a
Thanks for the reply's.
In summery it look's to me that "pre-fab" navigation (back-button,
bookmarking, search engines) can have problems with frames. What is a
good alternative for frames in (X)HTML for being able to keep the
static aspects of a website visible without rewriting them everytime?
And what role can Javascript play in the distinguishing between static
aspect of the website and the dynamic parts?

Jan 29 '06 #5

P: n/a
Linvo wrote:
What is a good alternative for frames in (X)HTML for being able to keep
the static aspects of a website visible without rewriting them everytime?
Visible all the time? To not. Screen real estate is too valuable to clutter
it up with content the user can get to with one tap of the home key (or a
quick drag of the scrollbar to the top).

On multiple pages? http://allmyfaqs.net/faq.pl?Include_one_file_in_another
And what role can Javascript play in the distinguishing between static
aspect of the website and the dynamic parts?


Don't distinguish. The user doesn't care how the pages are put together.

--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
Jan 29 '06 #6

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