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Import statement in NetBeans 3.5.1

P: n/a
I'm trying to get a java program to use a GUI included with my textbook,
Fundamentals of Java by Lambert and Osborne, called BreezySwing. The book
indicates that to import the GUI you need to declare:

import BreezySwing.*;

Whie is all well and good except that I can't quite figure out where I need
to put the BreezySwing.class (I think it's .class anyway) file included with
the textbook so that NetBeans 3.5.1 will understand that statement. Does
anyone know the directory I'd have to put BreezySwing.class in order for the
above import statement to work?

Any information is much appreciated!

--
AckbarJedi
---
"That theory is worthless. It isn't even wrong!" ~Wolfgang Pauli
---
To e-mail remove DeathtoSpam from my e-mail address.


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Jul 17 '05 #1
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P: n/a
"AckbarJedi" <Ac***************@hotSPAMmail.com> wrote in message
news:40**********@corp.newsgroups.com...
I'm trying to get a java program to use a GUI included with my textbook,
Fundamentals of Java by Lambert and Osborne, called BreezySwing. The book
indicates that to import the GUI you need to declare:

import BreezySwing.*;

Whie is all well and good except that I can't quite figure out where I need to put the BreezySwing.class (I think it's .class anyway) file included with the textbook so that NetBeans 3.5.1 will understand that statement. Does
anyone know the directory I'd have to put BreezySwing.class in order for the above import statement to work?

Any information is much appreciated!


In a BreezySwing directory that's a direct subdirectory of whatever
directory you have mounted in NetBeans. Import statements basically navigate
directories using dots as separators, so if you're working in C:\Java
(assuming a MS OS), then the statment:
import my.long.package.name.*;

would import all the class files in C:\Java\my\long\package\name
Jul 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
"Ryan Stewart" <za****@no.texas.spam.net> wrote in message
news:Z7********************@texas.net...
"AckbarJedi" <Ac***************@hotSPAMmail.com> wrote in message
news:40**********@corp.newsgroups.com...
I'm trying to get a java program to use a GUI included with my textbook,
Fundamentals of Java by Lambert and Osborne, called BreezySwing. The book indicates that to import the GUI you need to declare:

import BreezySwing.*;

Whie is all well and good except that I can't quite figure out where I need
to put the BreezySwing.class (I think it's .class anyway) file included

with
the textbook so that NetBeans 3.5.1 will understand that statement. Does anyone know the directory I'd have to put BreezySwing.class in order for

the
above import statement to work?

Any information is much appreciated!


In a BreezySwing directory that's a direct subdirectory of whatever
directory you have mounted in NetBeans. Import statements basically

navigate directories using dots as separators, so if you're working in C:\Java
(assuming a MS OS), then the statment:
import my.long.package.name.*;

would import all the class files in C:\Java\my\long\package\name


Ah okay...

To extend this idea... If I had an applet complied to Blah.class that used
BreezySwing and wanted to post it on a website, I should keep Blah.class and
the directory BreezySwing in the same folder as eachother?
--
AckbarJedi
---
"That theory is worthless. It isn't even wrong!" ~Wolfgang Pauli
---
To e-mail remove DeathtoSpam from my e-mail address.


-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
Jul 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
"AckbarJedi" <Ac***************@hotSPAMmail.com> wrote in message
news:40**********@corp.newsgroups.com...
"Ryan Stewart" <za****@no.texas.spam.net> wrote in message
news:Z7********************@texas.net...
"AckbarJedi" <Ac***************@hotSPAMmail.com> wrote in message
news:40**********@corp.newsgroups.com...
I'm trying to get a java program to use a GUI included with my textbook, Fundamentals of Java by Lambert and Osborne, called BreezySwing. The book indicates that to import the GUI you need to declare:

import BreezySwing.*;

Whie is all well and good except that I can't quite figure out where I need
to put the BreezySwing.class (I think it's .class anyway) file
included
with
the textbook so that NetBeans 3.5.1 will understand that statement. Does anyone know the directory I'd have to put BreezySwing.class in order

for the
above import statement to work?

Any information is much appreciated!


In a BreezySwing directory that's a direct subdirectory of whatever
directory you have mounted in NetBeans. Import statements basically

navigate
directories using dots as separators, so if you're working in C:\Java
(assuming a MS OS), then the statment:
import my.long.package.name.*;

would import all the class files in C:\Java\my\long\package\name


Ah okay...

To extend this idea... If I had an applet complied to Blah.class that used
BreezySwing and wanted to post it on a website, I should keep Blah.class

and the directory BreezySwing in the same folder as eachother?


Hmm, not sure about applets. I imagine it would be the same, yes. But it'd
be better to put them in a JAR file. That's the Java compression format. It
will compress your applet and make it a quicker download. If you're using
images and other files, though, it can be tricky reading them from a JAR.
Jul 17 '05 #4

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