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IDE for Java?

P: n/a
I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow. Can someone
recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper bag in a
few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for this
project.
Mar 13 '06 #1
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20 Replies


P: n/a
"Bill DeWitt" <bi*********@comsat.gov> wrote in message
news:Fo******************************@adelphia.com ...
I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow. Can
someone
recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper bag in a
few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for this
project.


You could try a programmer-oriented text editor (e.g. TextPad, JEdit,
etc.)

http://www.textpad.com/
http://www.jedit.org/

- Oliver

Mar 13 '06 #2

P: n/a
Bill DeWitt wrote:
I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow. Can someone
recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper bag in a
few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for this
project.

One step above a programmer-oriented text editor, without a lot of
learning curve for the IDE, would be either of these two:

jGRASP http://www.jgrasp.org
BlueJ http://www.bluej.org

Both are used in a learning environment of H.S.and Colleges It has just
been announced that Sun and NetBeans will offer a new IDE, based on
BlueJ, in the near future. This is so students can graduate, so to
speak, and ease into a professional IDE after using BlueJ.

Thanks in Advance...
IchBin, Pocono Lake, Pa, USA
http://weconsultants.servebeer.com/JHackerAppManager
__________________________________________________ ________________________

'If there is one, Knowledge is the "Fountain of Youth"'
-William E. Taylor, Regular Guy (1952-)
Mar 13 '06 #3

P: n/a
IchBin wrote:
Bill DeWitt wrote:
I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow. Can
someone
recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper bag
in a
few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for this
project.


Try JCreatorLE (http://www.jcreator.com).
It's a good one.
- Luke
Mar 20 '06 #4

P: n/a
Also try "Dr Java" at http://drjava.org/

J Pearson
"Luke H" <li***@paradise.net.nz> wrote in message
news:44********@news.orcon.net.nz...
IchBin wrote:
Bill DeWitt wrote:
I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow. Can
someone
recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper bag
in a
few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for this
project.


Try JCreatorLE (http://www.jcreator.com).
It's a good one.
- Luke

Mar 22 '06 #5

P: n/a
I recommend Eclipse strongly!

--
Kenvi Luo

21CN.COM 技术总部 BOSS项目组

地址:广州市体育东路六运五街52号2楼

电话:+86-20- 手机:+86

邮编:510620

E-mail:lj*@21cncorp.com

MSN:Au******@yahoo.com.cn
"Bill DeWitt" <bi*********@comsat.gov> 写入消息新闻:Fo******************************@adel phia.com...
I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow. Can
someone
recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper bag in a
few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for this
project.

Mar 22 '06 #6

P: n/a
Kenvi Luo wrote:
I recommend Eclipse strongly!


Yeah, except his problem was with the slowness of NetBeans; Eclipse may
be a bit snappier because it uses SWT rather than Swing, but probably is
still too slow for his machine. Besides, it's got an even steeper
learning curve.
Mar 26 '06 #7

P: n/a
BWill wrote:
Kenvi Luo wrote:
I recommend Eclipse strongly!


Yeah, except his problem was with the slowness of NetBeans; Eclipse may
be a bit snappier because it uses SWT rather than Swing, but probably is
still too slow for his machine. Besides, it's got an even steeper
learning curve.


Maybe the OP can respond to this thread so that people will not post to
it anymore.
Thanks in Advance...
IchBin, Pocono Lake, Pa, USA
http://weconsultants.servebeer.com/JHackerAppManager
__________________________________________________ ________________________

'If there is one, Knowledge is the "Fountain of Youth"'
-William E. Taylor, Regular Guy (1952-)
Mar 26 '06 #8

P: n/a

"IchBin" <we******@ptd.net> wrote in message
news:xD********************@ptd.net...
BWill wrote:
Kenvi Luo wrote:
I recommend Eclipse strongly!


Yeah, except his problem was with the slowness of NetBeans; Eclipse may
be a bit snappier because it uses SWT rather than Swing, but probably is
still too slow for his machine. Besides, it's got an even steeper
learning curve.


Maybe the OP can respond to this thread so that people will not post to
it anymore.


Yeah, I've been spending my time working... something wrong with that
whole idea...

But I have banged together a few little things, enough to make me
realize I am going to have to spend a little more time than I thought. I
will probably use one of the tools I ahve already been working with, just
because I don't have more time to try different things.

Thanks to all ...
Mar 27 '06 #9

P: n/a
Bill DeWitt wrote:
I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow. Can someone
recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper bag in a
few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for this
project.


JCreator is good, it's not an IDE as such but it has menu commands for
compiling and executing classes. Good for learning I found.
--
Marc
See http://www.imarc.co.uk/ for contact information.
Apr 11 '06 #10

P: n/a
On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 07:28:20 -0500, Bill DeWitt wrote:
Can someone recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
hiding every bit of code?


<http://www.bluej.org/>

--
Nigel M
Apr 11 '06 #11

P: n/a
Bill DeWitt wrote:
....

But I have banged together a few little things, enough to make me
realize I am going to have to spend a little more time than I thought. I
will probably use one of the tools I ahve already been working with, just
because I don't have more time to try different things.

Thanks to all ...


You know, I just have to say that when a language *requires* an IDE just to
get anything done, that language has become way too complex.

But hey, what do I know? I've only been at this for nearly 30 years.

--
-- Edmond Dantes
Shameless plugs:
http://www.HardIndustry.com
http://www.InteriorWorkz.com
http://www.Internet69.com
http://www.stateyourplace.com
http://www.AreYouTaken.com

May 3 '06 #12

P: n/a
On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 11:53:58 +0100, Marc wrote:
Bill DeWitt wrote:
I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow. Can someone
recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper bag in a
few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for this
project.


JCreator is good, it's not an IDE as such but it has menu commands for
compiling and executing classes. Good for learning I found.


You might try eclipse...

http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/

and netbeans ide...

http://www.netbeans.info/downloads/d...d.php?type=5.0
Jun 11 '06 #13

P: n/a
On Sun, 11 Jun 2006 14:49:13 +0000, ophidian wrote:
On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 11:53:58 +0100, Marc wrote:
Bill DeWitt wrote:
I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow. Can someone
recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper bag in a
few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for this
project.


JCreator is good, it's not an IDE as such but it has menu commands for
compiling and executing classes. Good for learning I found.


You might try eclipse...

http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/

and netbeans ide...

http://www.netbeans.info/downloads/d...d.php?type=5.0


VIDE can be used with Windows and Linux
Arachnophilia is Java based and can be used on any platform.

I have used both. Your mileage may vary.

Jun 14 '06 #14

P: n/a
>>> Bill DeWitt wrote:
I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow. Can
someone
recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper bag
in a
few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for this
project.

JCreator is good, it's not an IDE as such but it has menu commands for
compiling and executing classes. Good for learning I found.



I'm just starting to play around with java, and JCreator seems like a good
java IDE. The layout is a lot like microsoft visual tools. There is a
freeware version and a pro version. For me, JCreator feels right and works
well.

Another free IDE is NetBeans. I don't know what is going on, but it runs
incredibly poorly on my computer. NetBeans is a java app, so it may be an
indication that java is not installed correctly on my machine.

Roy Berube
Jun 23 '06 #15

P: n/a
Roy Berube wrote:
Bill DeWitt wrote:
> I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow. Can
> someone
> recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
> hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper bag
> in a
> few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for this
> project.
JCreator is good, it's not an IDE as such but it has menu commands for
compiling and executing classes. Good for learning I found.


I'm just starting to play around with java, and JCreator seems like a good
java IDE. The layout is a lot like microsoft visual tools. There is a
freeware version and a pro version. For me, JCreator feels right and works
well.

Another free IDE is NetBeans. I don't know what is going on, but it runs
incredibly poorly on my computer. NetBeans is a java app, so it may be an
indication that java is not installed correctly on my machine.

Roy Berube


JCreator IDE is Sun's extension of Netbeans 4.1 to do J2EE development.
If you are going to do JDK development and not J2EE 1.4 or 1.5 JCreator
may not be a good choice.

Thanks in Advance...
IchBin, Pocono Lake, Pa, USA http://weconsultants.awardspace.com
__________________________________________________ ________________________

'If there is one, Knowledge is the "Fountain of Youth"'
-William E. Taylor, Regular Guy (1952-)
Jun 24 '06 #16

P: n/a

"IchBin" <we******@ptd.net> wrote in message
news:K1********************@ptd.net...

JCreator IDE is Sun's extension of Netbeans 4.1 to do J2EE development. If
you are going to do JDK development and not J2EE 1.4 or 1.5 JCreator may
not be a good choice.

Thanks in Advance...
IchBin, Pocono Lake, Pa, USA http://weconsultants.awardspace.com


JCreator can do J2EE, but it handles J2SE as well. This blurb is from their
web site.
-----------------
JCreator is backwards-compatible with all previous version of the JDKs
published by Sun Microsystems. With one click, you can toggle between
different JDK profiles. Each profile defines the JDK home path and any
additional files for the classpath, such as the following:

a.. JDK 1.5.0
b.. JDK 1.5.0 - J2EE
c.. JDK 1.4.2
d.. JDK 1.2.2
e.. JDK 1.0.2
-----------------

Roy Berube
Jun 24 '06 #17

P: n/a
Roy Berube wrote:
"IchBin" <we******@ptd.net> wrote in message
news:K1********************@ptd.net...
JCreator IDE is Sun's extension of Netbeans 4.1 to do J2EE development. If
you are going to do JDK development and not J2EE 1.4 or 1.5 JCreator may
not be a good choice.

Thanks in Advance...
IchBin, Pocono Lake, Pa, USA http://weconsultants.awardspace.com


JCreator can do J2EE, but it handles J2SE as well. This blurb is from their
web site.
-----------------
JCreator is backwards-compatible with all previous version of the JDKs
published by Sun Microsystems. With one click, you can toggle between
different JDK profiles. Each profile defines the JDK home path and any
additional files for the classpath, such as the following:

a.. JDK 1.5.0
b.. JDK 1.5.0 - J2EE
c.. JDK 1.4.2
d.. JDK 1.2.2
e.. JDK 1.0.2
-----------------

Roy Berube

Thanks for the complete info..

Thanks in Advance...
IchBin, Pocono Lake, Pa, USA http://weconsultants.awardspace.com
__________________________________________________ ________________________

'If there is one, Knowledge is the "Fountain of Youth"'
-William E. Taylor, Regular Guy (1952-)
Jun 25 '06 #18

P: n/a
Roy Berube wrote:
>>>>Bill DeWitt wrote:

>I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow. Can
>someone
>recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie without
>hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper bag
>in a
>few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for this
>project.

JCreator is good, it's not an IDE as such but it has menu commands for
compiling and executing classes. Good for learning I found.


I'm just starting to play around with java, and JCreator seems like a good
java IDE. The layout is a lot like microsoft visual tools. There is a
freeware version and a pro version. For me, JCreator feels right and works
well.

Another free IDE is NetBeans. I don't know what is going on, but it runs
incredibly poorly on my computer. NetBeans is a java app, so it may be an
indication that java is not installed correctly on my machine.

Roy Berube

Yea, I used to have the same problem, but IDE 5 with the bundled jdk 1.5
is a significant performance boost, plus a more productive UI. Evenso,
you'll need at least 512MB of RAM, and 800 MHZ or higher CPU to truly
enjoy NetBeans. I'm running NetBeans right at this moment with just the
basic features turned on and it's consuming 103MB RAM. With all of the
features and included tools turned on, it can consume up ot 385MB of RAM.

Jan 8 '07 #19

P: n/a
tia
James wrote:
Roy Berube wrote:
>>>>Bill DeWitt wrote:
>
>I downloaded the Sun product, and find it feature rich but slow.
>Can someone
>recommend a more basic (freeware) IDE which will help a newbie
>without
>hiding every bit of code? I can program my way out of a wet paper
>bag in a
>few languages, but want to by-pass some of the learning curve for
>this
>project.
>
JCreator is good, it's not an IDE as such but it has menu commands for
compiling and executing classes. Good for learning I found.


I'm just starting to play around with java, and JCreator seems like a
good java IDE. The layout is a lot like microsoft visual tools. There
is a freeware version and a pro version. For me, JCreator feels right
and works well.

Another free IDE is NetBeans. I don't know what is going on, but it
runs incredibly poorly on my computer. NetBeans is a java app, so it
may be an indication that java is not installed correctly on my machine.

Roy Berube

Yea, I used to have the same problem, but IDE 5 with the bundled jdk 1.5
is a significant performance boost, plus a more productive UI. Evenso,
you'll need at least 512MB of RAM, and 800 MHZ or higher CPU to truly
enjoy NetBeans. I'm running NetBeans right at this moment with just the
basic features turned on and it's consuming 103MB RAM. With all of the
features and included tools turned on, it can consume up ot 385MB of RAM.
For quick and dirty tasks or when working with just a handful of
classes, I use TextPad. It recognizes Java syntax and has built in
support for compiling and running a small app. For everything else, I
use Eclipse because it's free and has all the tools you need. I love
IntelliJ - very intuitive, but it's not free.
Jan 17 '07 #20

P: n/a
tia wrote:
For quick and dirty tasks or when working with just a handful of
classes, I use TextPad. It recognizes Java syntax and has built in
support for compiling and running a small app. For everything else, I
use Eclipse because it's free and has all the tools you need. I love
IntelliJ - very intuitive, but it's not free.
I used to hate netbean's complexity, but now I've used it on an EJB
project i am very impressed. For what it does, you'd expect a high price
tag indeed.

--
Marc
For contact information, please see my web site: http://www.iMarc.co.uk/
Jan 21 '07 #21

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