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starting with sourcesafe

Hi!

I'm new to using sourcesafe. In fact I've never used it. We are 2 persons
developing one windows application on 2 different computers. You can for
sure understand our challenges, when we trie to merge this to versions to
one. For this I'm considering to install VSS on our server.

The installation part of VSS I think I understand, but how do I configure it
and how is the best progression of using it? (also with debugging in mind).

regards
Hans
Nov 16 '05 #1
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20 Replies
Hans [DiaGraphIT] <Ha************@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
I'm new to using sourcesafe. In fact I've never used it. We are 2 persons
developing one windows application on 2 different computers. You can for
sure understand our challenges, when we trie to merge this to versions to
one. For this I'm considering to install VSS on our server.

The installation part of VSS I think I understand, but how do I configure it
and how is the best progression of using it? (also with debugging in mind).


The best advice I could give is not to use it. I've found VSS nothing
but a nightmare to use - we'd have switched from it ages ago if we
didn't have it all set up already, with lots of file history.

See http://www.highprogrammer.com/alan/w...ourcesafe.html for
plenty of reasons to avoid VSS.

There are lots of other source control systems which are rather better
supported and don't lose data quite as often. Subversion
(http://subversion.tigris.org/) has just released v1.1, I believe - or
there's always CVS (http://www.cvshome.org), StarTeam etc.

Some of these may not be as well integrated into VS.NET, but there are
times when IDE integration is more of a curse than a blessing...

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 16 '05 #2
Thank you for quick reply!

I wounder if ClearCase is a better alternative?

--- < Hans > ---

"Jon Skeet [C# MVP]" wrote:
Hans [DiaGraphIT] <Ha************@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
I'm new to using sourcesafe. In fact I've never used it. We are 2 persons
developing one windows application on 2 different computers. You can for
sure understand our challenges, when we trie to merge this to versions to
one. For this I'm considering to install VSS on our server.

The installation part of VSS I think I understand, but how do I configure it
and how is the best progression of using it? (also with debugging in mind).


The best advice I could give is not to use it. I've found VSS nothing
but a nightmare to use - we'd have switched from it ages ago if we
didn't have it all set up already, with lots of file history.

See http://www.highprogrammer.com/alan/w...ourcesafe.html for
plenty of reasons to avoid VSS.

There are lots of other source control systems which are rather better
supported and don't lose data quite as often. Subversion
(http://subversion.tigris.org/) has just released v1.1, I believe - or
there's always CVS (http://www.cvshome.org), StarTeam etc.

Some of these may not be as well integrated into VS.NET, but there are
times when IDE integration is more of a curse than a blessing...

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too

Nov 16 '05 #3
On Fri, 1 Oct 2004 11:30:58 +0100, Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
See http://www.highprogrammer.com/alan/w...ourcesafe.html for
plenty of reasons to avoid VSS.


Interesting. I've heard people say that VSS is bad but I didn't realise it
was *that* bad.

Microsoft make me wonder. They have enough resources to make some great
products, and sometimes they do, but all too often they make some real
blunders (VSS, OE, IE, some parts of Windows, etc.).
Nov 16 '05 #4
Hans [DiaGraphIT] schrieb:
I wounder if ClearCase is a better alternative?


I thought you were 2 not 200?

ClearCase is a little bit too much for your current effort, I think.
Take a look at CVS or Subversion (which would be my choice). It's
stable, fast, powerful and free.

Christian
Nov 16 '05 #5
Hans [DiaGraphIT] <Ha************@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
Thank you for quick reply!

I wounder if ClearCase is a better alternative?


Almost certainly, although I don't have any experience with it. Any
reason for not going with a free solution though?

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 16 '05 #6
C# Learner <cs****@learner.here> wrote:
On Fri, 1 Oct 2004 11:30:58 +0100, Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
See http://www.highprogrammer.com/alan/w...ourcesafe.html for
plenty of reasons to avoid VSS.


Interesting. I've heard people say that VSS is bad but I didn't realise it
was *that* bad.

Microsoft make me wonder. They have enough resources to make some great
products, and sometimes they do, but all too often they make some real
blunders (VSS, OE, IE, some parts of Windows, etc.).


Indeed. I've heard rumours about a new SourceSafe coming with VS.NET
2005, but I don't know if they're true. I would *hope* that any such
new system would move away from VSS entirely and just provide an
upgrade path.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 16 '05 #7
Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
Indeed. I've heard rumours about a new SourceSafe coming with VS.NET
2005, but I don't know if they're true. I would *hope* that any such
new system would move away from VSS entirely and just provide an
upgrade path.


More than rumors, no? A little of both.

What's New: Visual SourceSafe for Visual Studio
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/8c69bh9d.aspx

Microsoft Visual SourceSafe Roadmap
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...tml/vssmap.asp

And if the team is a larger team:

Visual Studio 2005 Team System for Team Development
http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/vs2005...m/default.aspx

Visual Studio 2005 Team System: Enterprise-Class Source Control and Work
Item Tracking
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en.../vsts-team.asp
--
Tom Porterfield
Nov 16 '05 #8
Tom Porterfield <tp******@mvps.org> wrote:
Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
Indeed. I've heard rumours about a new SourceSafe coming with VS.NET
2005, but I don't know if they're true. I would *hope* that any such
new system would move away from VSS entirely and just provide an
upgrade path.
More than rumors, no? A little of both.


I couldn't remember which bits I'd seen under NDA and which I hadn't,
but I knew there had been some rumours which were public :)
What's New: Visual SourceSafe for Visual Studio
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/8c69bh9d.aspx

Microsoft Visual SourceSafe Roadmap
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...tml/vssmap.asp
Oh dear - it keeps the file sharing architecture :(
And if the team is a larger team:

Visual Studio 2005 Team System for Team Development
http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/vs2005...m/default.aspx

Visual Studio 2005 Team System: Enterprise-Class Source Control and Work
Item Tracking
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en.../vsts-team.asp


These sound promising, although I didn't see much in the way of details
as to how the source control system works, or whether it provides an
upgrade path from VSS. We can but hope...

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 16 '05 #9
"Jon Skeet [C# MVP]" <sk***@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:MP************************@msnews.microsoft.c om...
Tom Porterfield <tp******@mvps.org> wrote:
Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:

What's New: Visual SourceSafe for Visual Studio
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/8c69bh9d.aspx

Microsoft Visual SourceSafe Roadmap
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...tml/vssmap.asp


Oh dear - it keeps the file sharing architecture :(


VSS is for small teams, like the Original Poster. In that case, it's
simplicity and ease of use are compelling. In repeated surveys of
developers who chose VSS over the competition, the overwheming majority of
them gave usability reasons. I know that there are problems with VSS. One
of my projects involves a dev team on another continent, and for that team,
we are not using VSS... and sometimes the integration is a little rough
around the edges... but I still think VSS is a good tool for small teams,
and the new bits will make it better.
And if the team is a larger team:

Visual Studio 2005 Team System for Team Development
http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/vs2005...m/default.aspx

Visual Studio 2005 Team System: Enterprise-Class Source Control and Work
Item Tracking
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en.../vsts-team.asp


These sound promising, although I didn't see much in the way of details
as to how the source control system works, or whether it provides an
upgrade path from VSS. We can but hope...


I, too, am under NDA. Let's just say that I expect that you will really
like what you see.

--- Nick
Nov 16 '05 #10
Wow... that's rare... a small team with money.

The current standard on the open internet is CVS. It's free and there are
even integrations available for Visual Studio and Windows Explorer.
Personally, I hate it, but I'm spoiled by VSS's ease of use.

I've been using source code control systems for 20 years now (started with
SCCS on UNIX System V). I've seen good and bad. Where VSS is good, it's
great. Where it's bad, it is truly bad. A judicious use of backup
procedures, and keeping multiple backups, is how I work around any concerns
about VSS. I've used VSS for literally hundreds of projects over the years,
totalling thousands of files. In all that time, I've lost exactly one
"recent edit" and had to use the backup (which was a day old)... That was
years ago.

I respectfully disagree with Jon about the weaknesses of VSS and I think you
will find it useful and easy. That said, if you elect to move away from
VSS, I'd strongly suggest sticking with a product that is widely used, so
you can get help when you need it.

Good Luck,
--- Nick

"Hans [DiaGraphIT]" <Ha************@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
message news:96**********************************@microsof t.com...
Thank you for quick reply!

I wounder if ClearCase is a better alternative?

--- < Hans > ---

"Jon Skeet [C# MVP]" wrote:
Hans [DiaGraphIT] <Ha************@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
I'm new to using sourcesafe. In fact I've never used it. We are 2 persons developing one windows application on 2 different computers. You can for sure understand our challenges, when we trie to merge this to versions to one. For this I'm considering to install VSS on our server.

The installation part of VSS I think I understand, but how do I configure it and how is the best progression of using it? (also with debugging in
mind).
The best advice I could give is not to use it. I've found VSS nothing
but a nightmare to use - we'd have switched from it ages ago if we
didn't have it all set up already, with lots of file history.

See http://www.highprogrammer.com/alan/w...ourcesafe.html for
plenty of reasons to avoid VSS.

There are lots of other source control systems which are rather better
supported and don't lose data quite as often. Subversion
(http://subversion.tigris.org/) has just released v1.1, I believe - or
there's always CVS (http://www.cvshome.org), StarTeam etc.

Some of these may not be as well integrated into VS.NET, but there are
times when IDE integration is more of a curse than a blessing...

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too

Nov 16 '05 #11
Nick Malik <ni*******@hotmail.nospam.com> wrote:
Microsoft Visual SourceSafe Roadmap
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...tml/vssmap.asp
Oh dear - it keeps the file sharing architecture :(


VSS is for small teams, like the Original Poster. In that case, it's
simplicity and ease of use are compelling. In repeated surveys of
developers who chose VSS over the competition, the overwheming majority of
them gave usability reasons.


I wonder how much they'd used it in anger (branching etc) before making
their decision, however. That's the trouble - you don't really know how
usable something like this is until you've used it over an entire
product lifecycle. VSS is certainly simple when you're doing things
exactly the way it wants you to, and when you're not trying to work
with the more complicated features. Unfortunately, in my experience any
non-trivial app is going to require the more complicated features
sooner or later.
I know that there are problems with VSS. One of my projects involves
a dev team on another continent, and for that team, we are not using
VSS... and sometimes the integration is a little rough around the
edges... but I still think VSS is a good tool for small teams, and
the new bits will make it better.


The key things I find annoying about it:

o The repository breaks. The key thing I look for in a source control
system is that it doesn't eat my source. VSS fails on this front. It
requires reasonable frequent analyze/repair cycles, and even they
don't always fix things.

o The integration is indeed rough around the edges - you never *really*
know where it's going to put a new project when you ask it to place
it under source control, IME. Amusingly, the 3rd party integration of
VSS with Eclipse is more usuable (again IME) than the MS integration
of VSS with VS.NET.

o It's incredibly slow over a VPN, due to the file sharing interface.
We only have four developers these days - hardly a huge team - but
sometimes we do work from home.

o The conceptual model isn't as clear as it could be, when it comes to
labels/sharing/branching. I suspect this is true for most source
control systems though - there are certainly real problems which are
hard to solve with simple concepts without either fudging things or
preventing some solutions to real-world scenarios.
These sound promising, although I didn't see much in the way of details
as to how the source control system works, or whether it provides an
upgrade path from VSS. We can but hope...


I, too, am under NDA. Let's just say that I expect that you will really
like what you see.


Now that's good news :)

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 16 '05 #12
Nick Malik <ni*******@hotmail.nospam.com> wrote:
Wow... that's rare... a small team with money.

The current standard on the open internet is CVS. It's free and there are
even integrations available for Visual Studio and Windows Explorer.
Personally, I hate it, but I'm spoiled by VSS's ease of use.
Ease of use like the way it does a lot of stuff in the UI thread, which
stops you from minimising it etc, and has a load of fixed-size windows?
I forgot to mention those in my "gripes" earlier. While parts of the
VSS client are easy to use, other parts are truly awful.

I haven't seen whether those problems have been fixed by VSS 2005 yet -
I must have a look at the Whidbey beta in that respect some time...
I've been using source code control systems for 20 years now (started with
SCCS on UNIX System V). I've seen good and bad. Where VSS is good, it's
great. Where it's bad, it is truly bad. A judicious use of backup
procedures, and keeping multiple backups, is how I work around any concerns
about VSS. I've used VSS for literally hundreds of projects over the years,
totalling thousands of files. In all that time, I've lost exactly one
"recent edit" and had to use the backup (which was a day old)... That was
years ago.

I respectfully disagree with Jon about the weaknesses of VSS and I think you
will find it useful and easy. That said, if you elect to move away from
VSS, I'd strongly suggest sticking with a product that is widely used, so
you can get help when you need it.


The problem is that while there are indeed a lot of people who have had
no problems, there are also a lot of people who *have* lost data - and
there's no obvious way of finding out which you're going to be ahead of
time.

If it were just my company which had had problems with VSS, I would put
it down to us doing something wrong - but it's clearly not.

I agree with sticking with a product that's widely used, btw.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 16 '05 #13
Thank you Tom for answering my question :-)

Have en excellent weekend
Hans

"Tom Porterfield" wrote:
Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
Indeed. I've heard rumours about a new SourceSafe coming with VS.NET
2005, but I don't know if they're true. I would *hope* that any such
new system would move away from VSS entirely and just provide an
upgrade path.


More than rumors, no? A little of both.

What's New: Visual SourceSafe for Visual Studio
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/8c69bh9d.aspx

Microsoft Visual SourceSafe Roadmap
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...tml/vssmap.asp

And if the team is a larger team:

Visual Studio 2005 Team System for Team Development
http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/vs2005...m/default.aspx

Visual Studio 2005 Team System: Enterprise-Class Source Control and Work
Item Tracking
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en.../vsts-team.asp
--
Tom Porterfield

Nov 16 '05 #14
Hi Jon!

Thank you for your time. For information... we are as most people... short
on money :-). Our demands are not big. As Christian Gudrian sade we are
not 200. Perhaps is VSS good enough for our use, but I will seriously have a
look at CVS.

Have a splendent weekend

---< Hans >----

"Jon Skeet [C# MVP]" wrote:
Nick Malik <ni*******@hotmail.nospam.com> wrote:
Wow... that's rare... a small team with money.

The current standard on the open internet is CVS. It's free and there are
even integrations available for Visual Studio and Windows Explorer.
Personally, I hate it, but I'm spoiled by VSS's ease of use.


Ease of use like the way it does a lot of stuff in the UI thread, which
stops you from minimising it etc, and has a load of fixed-size windows?
I forgot to mention those in my "gripes" earlier. While parts of the
VSS client are easy to use, other parts are truly awful.

I haven't seen whether those problems have been fixed by VSS 2005 yet -
I must have a look at the Whidbey beta in that respect some time...
I've been using source code control systems for 20 years now (started with
SCCS on UNIX System V). I've seen good and bad. Where VSS is good, it's
great. Where it's bad, it is truly bad. A judicious use of backup
procedures, and keeping multiple backups, is how I work around any concerns
about VSS. I've used VSS for literally hundreds of projects over the years,
totalling thousands of files. In all that time, I've lost exactly one
"recent edit" and had to use the backup (which was a day old)... That was
years ago.

I respectfully disagree with Jon about the weaknesses of VSS and I think you
will find it useful and easy. That said, if you elect to move away from
VSS, I'd strongly suggest sticking with a product that is widely used, so
you can get help when you need it.


The problem is that while there are indeed a lot of people who have had
no problems, there are also a lot of people who *have* lost data - and
there's no obvious way of finding out which you're going to be ahead of
time.

If it were just my company which had had problems with VSS, I would put
it down to us doing something wrong - but it's clearly not.

I agree with sticking with a product that's widely used, btw.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too

Nov 16 '05 #15
i know a few companies switching fom VSS to subversion.
the company i'm working in is just switching form CVS to subversion.
a big german company hast just dropped VSS and is now using subversion.
they have spent 3 months with a lot of manpower for comparing both systems.

the integration for subversion and VS ist pretty good.
take a look on ankh. is a plug in for VS. without ankh you can use
tortoise for checking in and out via the explorer.

VSS is not under further development. perhaps the new version will do
anything better.
but so long use subversion.

the only problem subversion has is to manage webprojects. but there a
"special" version
to manage this too.

setting up subversion for 2 developers should take about half an hour.
using it is as easy as using VSS.

my 50 cents

Hans [DiaGraphIT] schrieb:
Hi!

I'm new to using sourcesafe. In fact I've never used it. We are 2 persons
developing one windows application on 2 different computers. You can for
sure understand our challenges, when we trie to merge this to versions to
one. For this I'm considering to install VSS on our server.

The installation part of VSS I think I understand, but how do I configure it
and how is the best progression of using it? (also with debugging in mind).

regards
Hans

Nov 16 '05 #16
InTheMood wrote:
VSS is not under further development. perhaps the new version will do
anything better.
but so long use subversion.
Not that I would endorse it, but VS is still developed:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...tml/vssmap.asp

the only problem subversion has is to manage webprojects. but there a
"special" version
to manage this too.
Actually that's a VS.NET problem. It cannot deal with subversion's
".svn" folders because of the leading dot.

bye
Rob


setting up subversion for 2 developers should take about half an hour.
using it is as easy as using VSS.

my 50 cents

Hans [DiaGraphIT] schrieb:
Hi!

I'm new to using sourcesafe. In fact I've never used it. We are 2
persons developing one windows application on 2 different computers.
You can for sure understand our challenges, when we trie to merge this
to versions to one. For this I'm considering to install VSS on our
server.

The installation part of VSS I think I understand, but how do I
configure it and how is the best progression of using it? (also with
debugging in mind).

regards
Hans

Nov 16 '05 #17
ok, my information was that VSS development is stopped.
despite the fact its still under devel. in my eyes subversion is the
better solution.

i forgot to say that: it's a source safe bug! not a subversion problem.
more presisely, it's a bug in IIS's WebDav as far i know.

but there are is a version of subversion that deals with a "_svn" folder
instead of
a ".svn" folder. you only have to change ankhs config file to work with
that folder.

tortoise provides a "_svn" version too.
cheers
(InTheMood)
Robert Jordan schrieb:
InTheMood wrote:
VSS is not under further development. perhaps the new version will do
anything better.
but so long use subversion.

Not that I would endorse it, but VS is still developed:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...tml/vssmap.asp


the only problem subversion has is to manage webprojects. but there a
"special" version
to manage this too.

Actually that's a VS.NET problem. It cannot deal with subversion's
".svn" folders because of the leading dot.

bye
Rob


setting up subversion for 2 developers should take about half an
hour. using it is as easy as using VSS.

my 50 cents

Hans [DiaGraphIT] schrieb:
Hi!

I'm new to using sourcesafe. In fact I've never used it. We are 2
persons developing one windows application on 2 different
computers. You can for sure understand our challenges, when we trie
to merge this to versions to one. For this I'm considering to
install VSS on our server.

The installation part of VSS I think I understand, but how do I
configure it and how is the best progression of using it? (also with
debugging in mind).

regards
Hans

Nov 16 '05 #18
I am and the development groups I have worked in have used VSS for
years. I have a slightly different prospective that may eventually apply
to you. I am a remote developer. I have worked out of my house for about
12 year. VSS was horrid for remote development. It became much more
tolerable once Source Offsite came out. The combination with Source
Offsite and VSS is usable but you need to really have good backups
because or all the reasons mentioned by the other people. My current
organization is using Clearcase and let me tell you it is even more
horrid for remote development than VSS. I would avoid it at all costs.
It is really made for the maintenance and release organizations and not
really nice for developers to use. Its advantages are for very large
organizations that have different teams working on different releases
and projects that may eventually merge into some new future release.

If your two person group plans to do any remote development like from
your home and or traveling, I would really look into CVS or Subversion.
They are much more conducive to that.

Just my opinion.
Leon Lambert
Hans [DiaGraphIT] wrote:
Hi!

I'm new to using sourcesafe. In fact I've never used it. We are 2 persons
developing one windows application on 2 different computers. You can for
sure understand our challenges, when we trie to merge this to versions to
one. For this I'm considering to install VSS on our server.

The installation part of VSS I think I understand, but how do I configure it
and how is the best progression of using it? (also with debugging in mind).

regards
Hans

Nov 16 '05 #19

If you only need 2 people using the database, consider Perforce:

www.perforce.com

They allow a 2 license configuration to be used, free of charge. Wonderful
for home projects and small teams.

Warren.

"Leon Lambert" <la******@inil.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
I am and the development groups I have worked in have used VSS for years. I
have a slightly different prospective that may eventually apply to you. I
am a remote developer. I have worked out of my house for about 12 year. VSS
was horrid for remote development. It became much more tolerable once
Source Offsite came out. The combination with Source Offsite and VSS is
usable but you need to really have good backups because or all the reasons
mentioned by the other people. My current organization is using Clearcase
and let me tell you it is even more horrid for remote development than VSS.
I would avoid it at all costs. It is really made for the maintenance and
release organizations and not really nice for developers to use. Its
advantages are for very large organizations that have different teams
working on different releases and projects that may eventually merge into
some new future release.

If your two person group plans to do any remote development like from your
home and or traveling, I would really look into CVS or Subversion. They
are much more conducive to that.

Just my opinion.
Leon Lambert
Hans [DiaGraphIT] wrote:
Hi!

I'm new to using sourcesafe. In fact I've never used it. We are 2
persons developing one windows application on 2 different computers. You
can for sure understand our challenges, when we trie to merge this to
versions to one. For this I'm considering to install VSS on our server.

The installation part of VSS I think I understand, but how do I configure
it and how is the best progression of using it? (also with debugging in
mind).

regards
Hans

Nov 16 '05 #20
on a similar note,
how do you source-control your SQL Server schema, views, etc. in CVS?
All 3rd party SQL Server version control products I've seen use VSS and
as such don't support merging, etc.
So for now I'm writing my own tool - not that much fun.

Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
Hans [DiaGraphIT] <Ha************@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
I'm new to using sourcesafe. In fact I've never used it. We are 2 persons
developing one windows application on 2 different computers. You can for
sure understand our challenges, when we trie to merge this to versions to
one. For this I'm considering to install VSS on our server.

The installation part of VSS I think I understand, but how do I configure it
and how is the best progression of using it? (also with debugging in mind).

The best advice I could give is not to use it. I've found VSS nothing
but a nightmare to use - we'd have switched from it ages ago if we
didn't have it all set up already, with lots of file history.

See http://www.highprogrammer.com/alan/w...ourcesafe.html for
plenty of reasons to avoid VSS.

There are lots of other source control systems which are rather better
supported and don't lose data quite as often. Subversion
(http://subversion.tigris.org/) has just released v1.1, I believe - or
there's always CVS (http://www.cvshome.org), StarTeam etc.

Some of these may not be as well integrated into VS.NET, but there are
times when IDE integration is more of a curse than a blessing...

Nov 16 '05 #21

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