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Visual Basic 6 Professional - Academic Price?

P: n/a
Since this is now a discontinued and unsupported product from
Microsoft, is it ok to develop and sell software made with it now? I
still have my old copy from back in my college days.
Dec 1 '07 #1
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14 Replies


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"TheRoK" <na**@company.comwrote in message
news:2m********************************@4ax.com...
Since this is now a discontinued and unsupported product from
Microsoft, is it ok to develop and sell software made with it now? I
still have my old copy from back in my college days.
Check the license agreement. Most does not change wheter the product is new,
old, or discontinued.
Dec 1 '07 #2

P: n/a
TheRoK wrote:
Since this is now a discontinued and unsupported product from
Microsoft, is it ok to develop and sell software made with it now? I
still have my old copy from back in my college days.
I assume by "OK" that you mean its supported?
The VB6 IDE itself isn't really supported, but the runtime is supported
at least through the life of Windows Vista.

--
Dean Earley (de*********@icode.co.uk)
i-Catcher Development Team

iCode Systems
Dec 3 '07 #3

P: n/a
On Mon, 03 Dec 2007 09:45:39 +0000, Dean Earley
<de*********@icode.co.ukwrote:

By "OK" I mean....when this particular product was on the market, it
was priced at a special discount price of $99 for students only, not
for deveopment to make a profit from selling software compiled on it.
And when I was a student, this is exactly what I used it for.

Now that Visual Basic 6.0 is old, discontinued, and abandoned by
Microsoft, I was just wondering if its now ok to sell software
compiled on an academic version such as the one I still own.

Will Microsoft come after me with lawsuits now, if I try to put a few
of the programs I've written on the market?

If I must upgrade, how can I do so if this product is now abandoned by
Microsoft? I like Visual Basic a lot, and I prefer it over any other
programmng language. I don't like Dot.Net and I don't ever want to
use it.
>TheRoK wrote:
>Since this is now a discontinued and unsupported product from
Microsoft, is it ok to develop and sell software made with it now? I
still have my old copy from back in my college days.

I assume by "OK" that you mean its supported?
The VB6 IDE itself isn't really supported, but the runtime is supported
at least through the life of Windows Vista.
Dec 3 '07 #4

P: n/a

"TheRoK" <na**@company.comwrote in message
news:sn********************************@4ax.com...
On Mon, 03 Dec 2007 09:45:39 +0000, Dean Earley
<de*********@icode.co.ukwrote:

By "OK" I mean....when this particular product was on the market, it
was priced at a special discount price of $99 for students only, not
for deveopment to make a profit from selling software compiled on it.
And when I was a student, this is exactly what I used it for.

Now that Visual Basic 6.0 is old, discontinued, and abandoned by
Microsoft, I was just wondering if its now ok to sell software
compiled on an academic version such as the one I still own.

Will Microsoft come after me with lawsuits now, if I try to put a few
of the programs I've written on the market?

If I must upgrade, how can I do so if this product is now abandoned by
Microsoft? I like Visual Basic a lot, and I prefer it over any other
programmng language. I don't like Dot.Net and I don't ever want to
use it.
I think once you tried VB.Net you'd become more "addicted" to VB. There are
quite a few tools, snippets, tutorials and examples on the web to get you
through the learning curve. That's my opinion on it anyway.
Dec 3 '07 #5

P: n/a
On Mon, 03 Dec 2007 15:53:12 GMT, Hosmerica wrote:
I think once you tried VB.Net you'd become more "addicted" to VB.
There are quite a few tools, snippets, tutorials and examples on
the web to get you through the learning curve. That's my opinion
on it anyway.
It'd be neat if there was some VB in it, too.

--
auric dot auric at gmail dot com
email sent to the above address is not treated as private
*****
- I didn't know we lived so close to the hotel.
- No kidding, we only look out the windows to throw burning tapes.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Dec 3 '07 #6

P: n/a
TheRoK <na**@company.com>'s wild thoughts were released on
Mon, 03 Dec 2007 09:56:43 -0500 bearing the following fruit:
>On Mon, 03 Dec 2007 09:45:39 +0000, Dean Earley
<de*********@icode.co.ukwrote:

By "OK" I mean....when this particular product was on the market, it
was priced at a special discount price of $99 for students only, not
for deveopment to make a profit from selling software compiled on it.
And when I was a student, this is exactly what I used it for.

Now that Visual Basic 6.0 is old, discontinued, and abandoned by
Microsoft, I was just wondering if its now ok to sell software
compiled on an academic version such as the one I still own.

Will Microsoft come after me with lawsuits now, if I try to put a few
of the programs I've written on the market?
The licence agreement would still be in effect, they may not
be maintaining the product anymore but that is not to save
licence agreements are no longer valid.
>If I must upgrade, how can I do so if this product is now abandoned by
Microsoft? I like Visual Basic a lot, and I prefer it over any other
programmng language. I don't like Dot.Net and I don't ever want to
use it.
You'll probably be able to buy a cheap second hand copy (try
ebay) for less that it would have cost to upgrade anyway.

J
>
>>TheRoK wrote:
>>Since this is now a discontinued and unsupported product from
Microsoft, is it ok to develop and sell software made with it now? I
still have my old copy from back in my college days.

I assume by "OK" that you mean its supported?
The VB6 IDE itself isn't really supported, but the runtime is supported
at least through the life of Windows Vista.
--
Jan Hyde

https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Jan.Hyde
Dec 3 '07 #7

P: n/a

"Auric__" <no*********@email.addresswrote in message
news:47***********************@free.teranews.com.. .
On Mon, 03 Dec 2007 15:53:12 GMT, Hosmerica wrote:
>I think once you tried VB.Net you'd become more "addicted" to VB.
There are quite a few tools, snippets, tutorials and examples on
the web to get you through the learning curve. That's my opinion
on it anyway.

It'd be neat if there was some VB in it, too.
LOL.. I am with you on that one :-)
Dec 4 '07 #8

P: n/a

"Auric__" <no*********@email.addresswrote in message
news:47***********************@free.teranews.com.. .
On Mon, 03 Dec 2007 15:53:12 GMT, Hosmerica wrote:
>I think once you tried VB.Net you'd become more "addicted" to VB.
There are quite a few tools, snippets, tutorials and examples on
the web to get you through the learning curve. That's my opinion
on it anyway.

It'd be neat if there was some VB in it, too.

I don't get what you're saying. What do you mean?
Dec 4 '07 #9

P: n/a
Hosmerica wrote:
"Auric__" <no*********@email.addresswrote in message
news:47***********************@free.teranews.com.. .
>On Mon, 03 Dec 2007 15:53:12 GMT, Hosmerica wrote:
>>I think once you tried VB.Net you'd become more "addicted" to VB.
There are quite a few tools, snippets, tutorials and examples on
the web to get you through the learning curve. That's my opinion
on it anyway.
It'd be neat if there was some VB in it, too.

I don't get what you're saying. What do you mean?
A lot of people consider vb.net a completely different language to
classic vb6. The similarities are limited to some of the function names,
most of syntax and that's about it.
The .net environment is COMPLETELY different to native win32 and VB6 and
requires a fairly large change in mindset for the die hard vb6 developers :)

Personally, I use VB6 and C# but didn't get on with vb.net (I'm not
entirely sure why)

--
Dean Earley (de*********@icode.co.uk)
i-Catcher Development Team

iCode Systems
Dec 4 '07 #10

P: n/a
On Tue, 04 Dec 2007 16:08:30 GMT, Dean Earley wrote:
Hosmerica wrote:
>"Auric__" <no*********@email.addresswrote in message
news:47***********************@free.teranews.com. ..
>>On Mon, 03 Dec 2007 15:53:12 GMT, Hosmerica wrote:

I think once you tried VB.Net you'd become more "addicted" to
VB. There are quite a few tools, snippets, tutorials and
examples on the web to get you through the learning curve.
That's my opinion on it anyway.
It'd be neat if there was some VB in it, too.

I don't get what you're saying. What do you mean?

A lot of people consider vb.net a completely different language to
classic vb6. The similarities are limited to some of the function
names, most of syntax and that's about it.
It's been a while since I looked at VB.Net, but IIRC the overall
language structure is about half BASIC-ish and half C-ish.
The .net environment is COMPLETELY different to native win32 and
VB6 and requires a fairly large change in mindset for the die hard
vb6 developers :)

Personally, I use VB6 and C# but didn't get on with vb.net (I'm not
entirely sure why)
I mostly use PowerBasic, FreeBasic, and C. VB has been relegated to
occasional UI design for me. (And I don't really like bytecode
languages -- I don't program in Java or .Net and wouldn't even install
either, except that there are two Java programs and a few .Net ones
that I really like. [sigh])

--
auric dot auric at gmail dot com
email sent to the above address is not treated as private
*****
Like anything stays dead around here.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Dec 4 '07 #11

P: n/a

"Auric__" <no*********@email.addresswrote in message
news:47***********************@free.teranews.com.. .
On Tue, 04 Dec 2007 16:08:30 GMT, Dean Earley wrote:
>Hosmerica wrote:
>>"Auric__" <no*********@email.addresswrote in message
news:47***********************@free.teranews.com ...
On Mon, 03 Dec 2007 15:53:12 GMT, Hosmerica wrote:

I think once you tried VB.Net you'd become more "addicted" to
VB. There are quite a few tools, snippets, tutorials and
examples on the web to get you through the learning curve.
That's my opinion on it anyway.
It'd be neat if there was some VB in it, too.

I don't get what you're saying. What do you mean?

A lot of people consider vb.net a completely different language to
classic vb6. The similarities are limited to some of the function
names, most of syntax and that's about it.

It's been a while since I looked at VB.Net, but IIRC the overall
language structure is about half BASIC-ish and half C-ish.
That sounds right from what I've heard about it.
>
>The .net environment is COMPLETELY different to native win32 and
VB6 and requires a fairly large change in mindset for the die hard
vb6 developers :)

Personally, I use VB6 and C# but didn't get on with vb.net (I'm not
entirely sure why)

I mostly use PowerBasic, FreeBasic, and C. VB has been relegated to
occasional UI design for me. (And I don't really like bytecode
languages -- I don't program in Java or .Net and wouldn't even install
either, except that there are two Java programs and a few .Net ones
that I really like. [sigh])
This sounds alot like my boss. He's a FilePro/Unix/Linux guy. I ,on the
other hand, have become more involved with windows and the .Net platform.
I've written in CICS, Cobol, C++, and Java, but most of my experience is in
VB.NET. I originally learned VB6, but when the company says we need to stay
on the cutting edge of technology that's when I learned it. I haven't done
anything in C# yet, though it will probably happen. It seems to be
extremely popular. That said, the learning curve isn't as bad as you'd
think. Some things are frustrating to switch over, yet others are much
simplier in VB.NET than their VB6 counterpart.
Dec 4 '07 #12

P: n/a
On Tue, 04 Dec 2007 22:41:30 GMT, Hosmerica wrote:
"Auric__" <no*********@email.addresswrote in message
news:47***********************@free.teranews.com.. .
>It's been a while since I looked at VB.Net, but IIRC the overall
language structure is about half BASIC-ish and half C-ish.

That sounds right from what I've heard about it.
I forgot that it's about 10% XML.
>>The .net environment is COMPLETELY different to native win32 and
VB6 and requires a fairly large change in mindset for the die
hard vb6 developers :)

Personally, I use VB6 and C# but didn't get on with vb.net (I'm
not entirely sure why)

I mostly use PowerBasic, FreeBasic, and C. VB has been relegated
to occasional UI design for me. (And I don't really like bytecode
languages -- I don't program in Java or .Net and wouldn't even
install either, except that there are two Java programs and a few
.Net ones that I really like. [sigh])

This sounds alot like my boss. He's a FilePro/Unix/Linux guy.
I've been using Linux for almost 10 years, and used... uh... *some*
Unix-like system for 4 years before that in the Navy.
I
,on the other hand, have become more involved with windows and the
.Net platform. I've written in CICS, Cobol, C++, and Java, but most
of my experience is in VB.NET.
Yikes. COBOL. Suitable only for people who also like whips and chains
in the bedroom. Truly a painful language. (Did you know that Fujitsu
created a COBOL.Net? [shudder])

Some
things are frustrating to switch over, yet others are much simplier
in VB.NET than their VB6 counterpart.
Sure, but you're still using VB.Net.

--
auric dot auric at gmail dot com
email sent to the above address is not treated as private
*****
Security based on name munging isn't secure at all.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Dec 5 '07 #13

P: n/a

"Auric__" <no*********@email.addresswrote in message
news:47***********************@free.teranews.com.. .
On Tue, 04 Dec 2007 22:41:30 GMT, Hosmerica wrote:
<snipped>

Yikes. COBOL. Suitable only for people who also like whips and chains
in the bedroom. Truly a painful language. (Did you know that Fujitsu
created a COBOL.Net? [shudder])
<snipped>
I believe the most common description was "COBOL is like kicking a dead
whale down the beach with your bare feet."

Can't remember who wrote it, or where I heard it, but I never forgot it.
When asked to convert COBOL programs I used to ask the client if it was OK
to wear sandals? I thought I was quite witty. But after enough peculiar
looks I stopped. <bg>

-ralph

Dec 5 '07 #14

P: n/a
On Wed, 05 Dec 2007 23:44:30 GMT, Ralph wrote:
"Auric__" <no*********@email.addresswrote in message
news:47***********************@free.teranews.com.. .
>On Tue, 04 Dec 2007 22:41:30 GMT, Hosmerica wrote:
<snipped>

Yikes. COBOL. Suitable only for people who also like whips and
chains in the bedroom. Truly a painful language. (Did you know
that Fujitsu created a COBOL.Net? [shudder])
<snipped>

I believe the most common description was "COBOL is like kicking a
dead whale down the beach with your bare feet."
Wow. Pretty good. Fairly accurate, too.
Can't remember who wrote it, or where I heard it, but I never
forgot it. When asked to convert COBOL programs I used to ask the
client if it was OK to wear sandals? I thought I was quite witty.
But after enough peculiar looks I stopped. <bg>
I would too, if I hadn't just read your description.

--
auric dot auric at gmail dot com
email sent to the above address is not treated as private
*****
I could be wrong but that's never kept me from opening my mouth before.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Dec 6 '07 #15

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