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Oracle licensing for dual core processors

P: n/a
Hi,

Is there a reason why we have to pay more for licensing for a different
kind of processor?

Why are we not charged for the Hyperthreading on some processors also.

If Oracle is really conserned about the low end business market (small
and medium), then they should drop their attitude on Dual Core
processors.

If they start charging as if it was a normal processor, and ask the
normal price, then they would get more of this market coming in.

As long as Oracle keeps on having the attitude of charging more,
because Intel or some other cpu vendor decided to mprove their
processors because of overheating problems, I will have the attitude
that I will keep on reoccomending alternatives for Orcle like Mysql /
Postgre sql / Sybase, etc to the small/medium sector.

Microsoft's pricing model on double core processors suddenly sound
allot better.

Oracle are shooting themselves in the foot! Or am I the only person
feeling this way?

Shaun O'Reilly

Nov 23 '05 #1
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2 Replies


P: n/a
webwarrior wrote:
Hi,

Is there a reason why we have to pay more for licensing for a different
kind of processor?


Your post is pure unadulterated nonsense and has nothing to do with
Oracle's pricing model. But then I guess reality has nothing to do
with your desire to flame a company given where you posted this trash.

Oracle's pricing is published on its web site. Try reading it. Or is
that asking too much?
--
Daniel A. Morgan
http://www.psoug.org
da******@x.washington.edu
(replace x with u to respond)
Nov 23 '05 #2

P: n/a

Q: Will Oracle adjust its pricing based on advancements in hardware
technology, such as dual-core processors?
JW: A: No, we have no plans to change our processor licensing policies.
We charge per processor, which is the same as per core. For several
years, IBM has employed dual-core chip technology for their hardware.
Today, all their machines are based on dual-core or multi-core chips.
Several other hardware vendors are also pushing multi-core chips in
which more than one core is on one chip. Sun, for example, recently
released a dual-core UltraSparc chip. Both Intel and Advanced Micro
Devices have recently announced that they will also introduce dual-core
chips next year.

Some of the hardware vendors are suggesting software makers like Oracle
should retool their licensing models and charge per chip instead of
charging per processor. Microsoft recently announced they would charge
per chip and not per processor as Oracle and IBM both do today.
Look at: http://www.oracle.com/corporate/pres...multicore.html

Read for yourselves
*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Nov 23 '05 #3

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