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sre is broken in SuSE 9.2

P: n/a
On all platfroms \w matches all unicode letters when used with flag
re.UNICODE, but this doesn't work on SuSE 9.2:

Python 2.3.4 (#1, Dec 17 2004, 19:56:48)
[GCC 3.3.4 (pre 3.3.5 20040809)] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
import re
re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).match(u'\xe4')

BTW, is correctly recognize this character as lowercase letter: import unicodedata
unicodedata.category(u'\xe4')

'Ll'

I've looked through all SuSE patches applied, but found nothing related.
What is the reason for broken behavior? Incorrect configure options?

--
Denis S. Otkidach
http://www.python.ru/ [ru]
Jul 18 '05 #1
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24 Replies


P: n/a
Denis S. Otkidach wrote:
On all platfroms \w matches all unicode letters when used with flag
re.UNICODE, but this doesn't work on SuSE 9.2:

Python 2.3.4 (#1, Dec 17 2004, 19:56:48)
[GCC 3.3.4 (pre 3.3.5 20040809)] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
import re
re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).match(u'\xe4')

BTW, is correctly recognize this character as lowercase letter: import unicodedata
unicodedata.category(u'\xe4')

'Ll'

I've looked through all SuSE patches applied, but found nothing

related. What is the reason for broken behavior? Incorrect configure options?


I can get the same results on RedHat's python 2.2.3 if I pass re.L
option, it looks like this option is implicitly set in Suse.

Serge

Jul 18 '05 #2

P: n/a
On 10 Feb 2005 03:59:51 -0800
"Serge Orlov" <Se*********@gmail.com> wrote:
On all platfroms \w matches all unicode letters when used with flag
re.UNICODE, but this doesn't work on SuSE 9.2: [...]
I can get the same results on RedHat's python 2.2.3 if I pass re.L
option, it looks like this option is implicitly set in Suse.


Looks like you are right:
import re
re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).match(u'\xe4')
from locale import *
setlocale(LC_ALL, 'de_DE') 'de_DE' re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).match(u'\xe4')

<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x40375560>

But I see nothing related to implicit re.L option in their patches and
the sources themselves are the same as on other platforms. I'd prefer
to find the source of problem.

--
Denis S. Otkidach
http://www.python.ru/ [ru]
Jul 18 '05 #3

P: n/a
Denis S. Otkidach wrote:
On all platfroms \w matches all unicode letters when used with flag
re.UNICODE, but this doesn't work on SuSE 9.2:


I think Python on SuSE 9.2 uses UCS4 for unicode strings (as does
RedHat), check sys.maxunicode.

This is not an explanation, but perhaps a hint where to look.

Daniel
Jul 18 '05 #4

P: n/a
On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 16:23:09 +0100
Daniel Dittmar <da************@sap.corp> wrote:
Denis S. Otkidach wrote:
On all platfroms \w matches all unicode letters when used with flag
re.UNICODE, but this doesn't work on SuSE 9.2:


I think Python on SuSE 9.2 uses UCS4 for unicode strings (as does
RedHat), check sys.maxunicode.

This is not an explanation, but perhaps a hint where to look.


Yes, it uses UCS4. But debian build with UCS4 works fine, so this is
not a problem. Can --with-wctype-functions configure option be the
source of problem?

--
Denis S. Otkidach
http://www.python.ru/ [ru]
Jul 18 '05 #5

P: n/a
Denis S. Otkidach wrote:
On 10 Feb 2005 03:59:51 -0800
"Serge Orlov" <Se*********@gmail.com> wrote:
On all platfroms \w matches all unicode letters when used with flag re.UNICODE, but this doesn't work on SuSE 9.2: [...]
I can get the same results on RedHat's python 2.2.3 if I pass re.L
option, it looks like this option is implicitly set in Suse.


Looks like you are right:
import re
re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).match(u'\xe4')
from locale import *
setlocale(LC_ALL, 'de_DE') 'de_DE' re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).match(u'\xe4')

<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x40375560>

But I see nothing related to implicit re.L option in their patches
and the sources themselves are the same as on other platforms. I'd
prefer to find the source of problem.


I found that

print u'\xc4'.isalpha()
import locale
print locale.getlocale()

produces different results on Suse (python 2.3.3)

False
(None, None)
and RedHat (python 2.2.3)

1
(None, None)

Serge.

Jul 18 '05 #6

P: n/a
Denis S. Otkidach wrote:
> On all platfroms \w matches all unicode letters when used with flag
> re.UNICODE, but this doesn't work on SuSE 9.2:


I think Python on SuSE 9.2 uses UCS4 for unicode strings (as does
RedHat), check sys.maxunicode.

This is not an explanation, but perhaps a hint where to look.


Yes, it uses UCS4. But debian build with UCS4 works fine, so this is
not a problem. Can --with-wctype-functions configure option be the
source of problem?


yes.

that option disables Python's own Unicode database, and relies on the C library's
wctype.h (iswalpha, etc) to behave properly for Unicode characters. this isn't true
for all environments.

is this an official SuSE release? do they often release stuff that hasn't been tested
at all?

</F>

Jul 18 '05 #7

P: n/a
On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 17:46:06 +0100
"Fredrik Lundh" <fr*****@pythonware.com> wrote:
Can --with-wctype-functions configure option be the
source of problem?


yes.

that option disables Python's own Unicode database, and relies on the C library's
wctype.h (iswalpha, etc) to behave properly for Unicode characters. this isn't true
for all environments.

is this an official SuSE release? do they often release stuff that hasn't been tested
at all?


Yes, it's official release:
# rpm -qi python
Name : python Relocations: (not relocatable)
Version : 2.3.4 Vendor: SUSE LINUX AG, Nuernberg, Germany
Release : 3 Build Date: Tue Oct 5 02:28:25 2004
Install date: Fri Jan 28 13:53:49 2005 Build Host: gambey.suse.de
Group : Development/Languages/Python Source RPM: python-2.3.4-3.src.rpm
Size : 15108594 License: Artistic License, Other License(s), see package
Signature : DSA/SHA1, Tue Oct 5 02:42:38 2004, Key ID a84edae89c800aca
Packager : http://www.suse.de/feedback
URL : http://www.python.org/
Summary : Python Interpreter
<snip>

BTW, where have they found something with Artistic License in Python?

--
Denis S. Otkidach
http://www.python.ru/ [ru]
Jul 18 '05 #8

P: n/a
Denis S. Otkidach wrote:
On all platfroms \w matches all unicode letters when used with flag
re.UNICODE, but this doesn't work on SuSE 9.2:

Python 2.3.4 (#1, Dec 17 2004, 19:56:48)
[GCC 3.3.4 (pre 3.3.5 20040809)] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more

information.
import re
re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).match(u'\xe4')

BTW, is correctly recognize this character as lowercase letter: import unicodedata
unicodedata.category(u'\xe4')

'Ll'

I've looked through all SuSE patches applied, but found nothing
related. What is the reason for broken behavior? Incorrect
configure options?


To summarize the discussion: either it's a bug in glibc or there is an
option to specify modern POSIX locale. POSIX locale consist of
characters from the portable character set, unicode is certainly
portable.

Serge.

Jul 18 '05 #9

P: n/a
Serge Orlov schrieb:
Denis S. Otkidach wrote:
To summarize the discussion: either it's a bug in glibc or there is an
option to specify modern POSIX locale. POSIX locale consist of
characters from the portable character set, unicode is certainly
portable.


What about the environment variable LANG? I have SuSE 9.1 and
LANG = de_DE.UTF-8. Your example is running well on my computer.

--
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Peter Maas, M+R Infosysteme, D-52070 Aachen, Tel +49-241-93878-0
E-mail 'cGV0ZXIubWFhc0BtcGx1c3IuZGU=\n'.decode('base64')
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Jul 18 '05 #10

P: n/a
Peter Maas wrote:
Serge Orlov schrieb:
Denis S. Otkidach wrote:
To summarize the discussion: either it's a bug in glibc or there is an option to specify modern POSIX locale. POSIX locale consist of
characters from the portable character set, unicode is certainly
portable.


What about the environment variable LANG? I have SuSE 9.1 and
LANG = de_DE.UTF-8. Your example is running well on my computer.


This thread is about problems only with LANG=C or LANG=POSIX, it's not
about other locales. Other locales are working as expected.

Serge.

Jul 18 '05 #11

P: n/a
Peter Maas wrote:
To summarize the discussion: either it's a bug in glibc or there is an
option to specify modern POSIX locale. POSIX locale consist of
characters from the portable character set, unicode is certainly
portable.


What about the environment variable LANG? I have SuSE 9.1 and
LANG = de_DE.UTF-8. Your example is running well on my computer.


Python's Unicode subsystem shouldn't depend on the system's LANG
setting.

</F>

Jul 18 '05 #12

P: n/a
On 10 Feb 2005 11:49:33 -0800
"Serge Orlov" <Se*********@gmail.com> wrote:
This thread is about problems only with LANG=C or LANG=POSIX, it's not
about other locales. Other locales are working as expected.


You are not right. I have LANG=de_DE.UTF-8, and the Python test_re.py
doesn't pass. $LANG doesn't matter if I don't call setlocale.
Fortunately setting any non-C locale solves the problem for all (I
believe) unicode character:
re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).findall(u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430')

[u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430']

--
Denis S. Otkidach
http://www.python.ru/ [ru]
Jul 18 '05 #13

P: n/a
Denis S. Otkidach wrote:
On 10 Feb 2005 11:49:33 -0800
"Serge Orlov" <Se*********@gmail.com> wrote:
This thread is about problems only with LANG=C or LANG=POSIX, it's not
about other locales. Other locales are working as expected.
You are not right. I have LANG=de_DE.UTF-8, and the Python

test_re.py doesn't pass.
I meant "only with C or POSIX locales" when I wrote "only with LANG=C
or LANG=POSIX". My bad.
$LANG doesn't matter if I don't call setlocale.
Sure.
Fortunately setting any non-C locale solves the problem for all (I
believe) unicode character:
re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).findall(u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430')

[u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430']


I can't find the strict definition of isalpha, but I believe average
C program shouldn't care about the current locale alphabet, so isalpha
is a union of all supported characters in all alphabets

Serge.

Jul 18 '05 #14

P: n/a
Serge Orlov wrote:
>>> re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).findall(u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430')

[u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430']


I can't find the strict definition of isalpha, but I believe average
C program shouldn't care about the current locale alphabet, so isalpha
is a union of all supported characters in all alphabets


btw, what does isalpha have to do with this example?

</F>

Jul 18 '05 #15

P: n/a
Serge Orlov wrote:
>>> re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).findall(u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430')

[u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430']


I can't find the strict definition of isalpha, but I believe average
C program shouldn't care about the current locale alphabet, so isalpha
is a union of all supported characters in all alphabets


nope. isalpha() depends on the locale, as does all other ctype functions
(this also applies to wctype, on some platforms).

</F>

Jul 18 '05 #16

P: n/a
Serge Orlov wrote:
To summarize the discussion: either it's a bug in glibc or there is an
option to specify modern POSIX locale. POSIX locale consist of
characters from the portable character set, unicode is certainly
portable.


Yes, but U+00E4 is not in the portable character set. The portable
character set is defined here:

http://www.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/...d/charset.html

Regards,
Martin
Jul 18 '05 #17

P: n/a
"Martin v. Lwis" wrote:
Serge Orlov wrote:
> To summarize the discussion: either it's a bug in glibc or there

is an
option to specify modern POSIX locale. POSIX locale consist of
characters from the portable character set, unicode is certainly
portable.


Yes, but U+00E4 is not in the portable character set. The portable
character set is defined here:

http://www.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/...d/charset.html


Thanks for the link. They write (in 1997 or earlier ?):

The wide-character value for each member of the Portable
Character Set will equal its value when used as the lone character
in an integer character constant. Wide-character codes for other
characters are locale- and *implementation-dependent*

Emphasis is mine. So how many libc implementations with
non-unicode wide-character codes do we have in 2005?
I'm really interested to know.

Serge.
Jul 18 '05 #18

P: n/a
Fredrik Lundh wrote:
Serge Orlov wrote:
>> re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).findall(u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430')
>> [u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430']


I can't find the strict definition of isalpha, but I believe average
C program shouldn't care about the current locale alphabet, so
isalpha is a union of all supported characters in all alphabets


btw, what does isalpha have to do with this example?


It has to do with this thread. u'\xe4'.isalpha() returns false in
Suse. It's in the same boat as \w

Serge.
Jul 18 '05 #19

P: n/a
Fredrik Lundh wrote:
Serge Orlov wrote:
>> re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).findall(u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430')
>> [u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430']


I can't find the strict definition of isalpha, but I believe average
C program shouldn't care about the current locale alphabet, so
isalpha is a union of all supported characters in all alphabets


nope. isalpha() depends on the locale, as does all other ctype
functions (this also applies to wctype, on some platforms).


I mean "all supported characters in all alphabets [in the current
locale]". For example in ru_RU.koi8-r isalpha should return
true for characters in English and Russian alphabets. In
ru_RU.koi8-u -- for characters in English, Russia and Ukrain
alphabets, in ru_RU.utf-8 -- for all supported by the implementation
alphabetic characters in unicode. IMHO iswalpha in POSIX
locale can return true for all alphabetic characters in unicode
instead of being limited by English alphabet.

Serge.

true in
Jul 18 '05 #20

P: n/a
Serge Orlov wrote:
The wide-character value for each member of the Portable
Character Set will equal its value when used as the lone character
in an integer character constant. Wide-character codes for other
characters are locale- and *implementation-dependent*

Emphasis is mine.


the relevant part for this thread is *locale-*. if wctype depends on the
locale, it cannot be used for generic build. (custom interpreters are an-
other thing, but they shouldn't be shipped as "python").

</F>

Jul 18 '05 #21

P: n/a
On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 18:49:53 +0100
"Fredrik Lundh" <fr*****@pythonware.com> wrote:
>>> re.compile(ur'\w+', re.U).findall(u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430')
[u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430']


I can't find the strict definition of isalpha, but I believe average
C program shouldn't care about the current locale alphabet, so isalpha
is a union of all supported characters in all alphabets


btw, what does isalpha have to do with this example?


The same problem is with isalpha. In most distributions:
for c in u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430': print c.isalpha(), ....
True True True True

And in SuSE 9.2: for c in u'\xb5\xba\xe4\u0430': print c.isalpha(),

....
False False False False

--
Denis S. Otkidach
http://www.python.ru/ [ru]
Jul 18 '05 #22

P: n/a
On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 09:42:41 +0100
"Fredrik Lundh" <fr*****@pythonware.com> wrote:
the relevant part for this thread is *locale-*. if wctype depends on
the locale, it cannot be used for generic build. (custom interpreters
are an- other thing, but they shouldn't be shipped as "python").


You are right. But isalpha behavior looks strange for me anyway: why
cyrillic character '\u0430' is recognized as alpha one for de_DE locale,
but is not for C?

--
Denis S. Otkidach
http://www.python.ru/ [ru]
Jul 18 '05 #23

P: n/a
Serge Orlov wrote:
Emphasis is mine. So how many libc implementations with
non-unicode wide-character codes do we have in 2005?


Solaris has supported 2-byte wchar_t implementations for many
years, and so I believe did HP-UX and AIX.

ISO C99 defines a constant __STDC_ISO_10646__ which an
implementation can use to indicate that wchar_t uses
Unicode (aka ISO 10646) in all locales. Very few
implementations define this constant at this time, though.

Regards,
Martin
Jul 18 '05 #24

P: n/a
Denis S. Otkidach wrote:
You are right. But isalpha behavior looks strange for me anyway: why
cyrillic character '\u0430' is recognized as alpha one for de_DE locale,
but is not for C?


In glibc, all "real" locales are based on
/usr/share/locale/i18n/locales/i18n, e.g. for de_DE through

LC_CTYPE
copy "i18n"

i18n includes U+0430 as a character, through

lower /
....
% TABLE 11 CYRILLIC/
<U0430>..<U045F>;<U0461>..(2)..<U047F>;/

This makes U+0430 a letter in all locales including i18n
(unless locally overridden). This entire approach apparently
is based on ISO 14652, which, in section 4.3.3, introduces
the "i18n" LC_CTYPE category.

Why the C locale does not use i18n, I don't know. Most likely,
the intention is that the "C" locale works without any
additional data files - you should ask the glibc developers.
OTOH, there is a definition file POSIX for what appears
to be the POSIX locale.

I'd like to point out that this implementation is potentially
in violation of ISO 14652; annex A.2.2 says that the notion
of a POSIX locale is replaced with the i18n FDCC-set. So
accordingly, I would expect that i18n is used in POSIX as
well - see for yourself that it isn't in glibc 2.3.2.

Again, I suggest to ask the glibc developers as to why
this is so.

Regards,
Martin
Jul 18 '05 #25

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