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Namespace Naming Guidelines

Microsoft recommends CompanyName.Tec hnologyName[.Feature][.Design] and it
all comes down to not breaking the inheritence model if I am not mistaken.
VSN2003 however tells the compiler to use the name of the project as the
name of the .dll the project compiles to.

Developing on XP Pro in the Default Website would most commonly result in a
file system path such as...

InetPub/wwwroot/CompanyName.Tec hnologyName/default.aspx

....if I named the directory containing the project's files the same as the
name of the project itself, i.e the name of the project being
CompanyName.Tec hnologyName and the name of the directory where its file
resources are located also CompanyName.Tec hnologyName.

That seems to make sense to me but only on the local XP Pro development
'server.' This naming schema breaks down when deploying the project's
directory and file resources to the production web server which is provided
as a hosted service.

Its clumsy to request a page from the production server as http://
companyname.com/companyname.tec hnologyname/default.aspx. I've never seen it
done. So how do you resolve Namespace naming, project naming and so on?
After all this time 1.1 has matured I still don't get it and haven't found
any documents that discuss this context.

<%= Clinton Gallagher

[1]
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...guidelines.asp
Jul 21 '05 #1
6 2875
I think you are confusing the names of the project, solution, project
folder, assembly and namespace.

When you create a new project, you are asked to provide a name for that
project. The name you supply is the name that VS.NET uses for the solution,
project, project folder, root namespace and assembly. HOWEVER, you can
change these values after the project has been created. So, you could just
make a new project called what you'd like the project folder to be called
and then after the project is created, you can easily change the assembly
and root namespace names as well as the project and solution names.

Also, just because your local directory is called one thing, doesn't mean
that when you copy the project to the production server, you must use the
same directory name.
"clintonG" <cs*********@RE MOVETHISTEXTmet romilwaukee.com > wrote in message
news:%2******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP12.phx.gbl. ..
Microsoft recommends CompanyName.Tec hnologyName[.Feature][.Design] and it
all comes down to not breaking the inheritence model if I am not mistaken.
VSN2003 however tells the compiler to use the name of the project as the
name of the .dll the project compiles to.

Developing on XP Pro in the Default Website would most commonly result in
a file system path such as...

InetPub/wwwroot/CompanyName.Tec hnologyName/default.aspx

...if I named the directory containing the project's files the same as the
name of the project itself, i.e the name of the project being
CompanyName.Tec hnologyName and the name of the directory where its file
resources are located also CompanyName.Tec hnologyName.

That seems to make sense to me but only on the local XP Pro development
'server.' This naming schema breaks down when deploying the project's
directory and file resources to the production web server which is
provided as a hosted service.

Its clumsy to request a page from the production server as http://
companyname.com/companyname.tec hnologyname/default.aspx. I've never seen
it done. So how do you resolve Namespace naming, project naming and so on?
After all this time 1.1 has matured I still don't get it and haven't found
any documents that discuss this context.

<%= Clinton Gallagher

[1]
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...guidelines.asp

Jul 21 '05 #2
Thanks for your comments Scott.

If I create a new project using the name ArbitraryProjec tName I could then
rename the root namespace to CompanyName.Tec hnologyName easily enough but
VSN2003 will name the assembly ArbitraryProjec tName.dll. That's where I am
still hung up. What am I missing?

<%= Clinton Gallagher

"Scott M." <No****@NoSpam. com> wrote in message
news:uQ******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
I think you are confusing the names of the project, solution, project
folder, assembly and namespace.

When you create a new project, you are asked to provide a name for that
project. The name you supply is the name that VS.NET uses for the
solution, project, project folder, root namespace and assembly. HOWEVER,
you can change these values after the project has been created. So, you
could just make a new project called what you'd like the project folder to
be called and then after the project is created, you can easily change the
assembly and root namespace names as well as the project and solution
names.

Also, just because your local directory is called one thing, doesn't mean
that when you copy the project to the production server, you must use the
same directory name.
"clintonG" <cs*********@RE MOVETHISTEXTmet romilwaukee.com > wrote in message
news:%2******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP12.phx.gbl. ..
Microsoft recommends CompanyName.Tec hnologyName[.Feature][.Design] and it
all comes down to not breaking the inheritence model if I am not
mistaken. VSN2003 however tells the compiler to use the name of the
project as the name of the .dll the project compiles to.

Developing on XP Pro in the Default Website would most commonly result in
a file system path such as...

InetPub/wwwroot/CompanyName.Tec hnologyName/default.aspx

...if I named the directory containing the project's files the same as
the name of the project itself, i.e the name of the project being
CompanyName.Tec hnologyName and the name of the directory where its file
resources are located also CompanyName.Tec hnologyName.

That seems to make sense to me but only on the local XP Pro development
'server.' This naming schema breaks down when deploying the project's
directory and file resources to the production web server which is
provided as a hosted service.

Its clumsy to request a page from the production server as http://
companyname.com/companyname.tec hnologyname/default.aspx. I've never seen
it done. So how do you resolve Namespace naming, project naming and so
on? After all this time 1.1 has matured I still don't get it and haven't
found any documents that discuss this context.

<%= Clinton Gallagher

[1]
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...guidelines.asp


Jul 21 '05 #3
You can also change the assembly name.
Right click on the project and select properties. This will open the
property pages window. Under "Common Properties" -> General: You'll see
where to change the Assebmly Name and the Default Namespace. (if you change
the default namespace here you'll need to update existing files).

Dave

"clintonG" <cs*********@RE MOVETHISTEXTmet romilwaukee.com > wrote in message
news:ud******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP10.phx.gbl...
Thanks for your comments Scott.

If I create a new project using the name ArbitraryProjec tName I could then
rename the root namespace to CompanyName.Tec hnologyName easily enough but
VSN2003 will name the assembly ArbitraryProjec tName.dll. That's where I am
still hung up. What am I missing?

<%= Clinton Gallagher

"Scott M." <No****@NoSpam. com> wrote in message
news:uQ******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
I think you are confusing the names of the project, solution, project
folder, assembly and namespace.

When you create a new project, you are asked to provide a name for that
project. The name you supply is the name that VS.NET uses for the
solution, project, project folder, root namespace and assembly. HOWEVER, you can change these values after the project has been created. So, you
could just make a new project called what you'd like the project folder to be called and then after the project is created, you can easily change the assembly and root namespace names as well as the project and solution
names.

Also, just because your local directory is called one thing, doesn't mean that when you copy the project to the production server, you must use the same directory name.
"clintonG" <cs*********@RE MOVETHISTEXTmet romilwaukee.com > wrote in message news:%2******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP12.phx.gbl. ..
Microsoft recommends CompanyName.Tec hnologyName[.Feature][.Design] and it all comes down to not breaking the inheritence model if I am not
mistaken. VSN2003 however tells the compiler to use the name of the
project as the name of the .dll the project compiles to.

Developing on XP Pro in the Default Website would most commonly result in a file system path such as...

InetPub/wwwroot/CompanyName.Tec hnologyName/default.aspx

...if I named the directory containing the project's files the same as
the name of the project itself, i.e the name of the project being
CompanyName.Tec hnologyName and the name of the directory where its file
resources are located also CompanyName.Tec hnologyName.

That seems to make sense to me but only on the local XP Pro development
'server.' This naming schema breaks down when deploying the project's
directory and file resources to the production web server which is
provided as a hosted service.

Its clumsy to request a page from the production server as http://
companyname.com/companyname.tec hnologyname/default.aspx. I've never seen it done. So how do you resolve Namespace naming, project naming and so
on? After all this time 1.1 has matured I still don't get it and haven't found any documents that discuss this context.

<%= Clinton Gallagher

[1]
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...guidelines.asp



Jul 21 '05 #4
Thanks, I'll try some of that but I sure wish somebody with a job who is
getting paid to sit around would have written some best practice articles
:-)

<%= Clinton Gallagher

"David Young" <RE************ ******@yahoo.co m> wrote in message
news:uX******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP15.phx.gbl...
You can also change the assembly name.
Right click on the project and select properties. This will open the
property pages window. Under "Common Properties" -> General: You'll see
where to change the Assebmly Name and the Default Namespace. (if you
change
the default namespace here you'll need to update existing files).

Dave

"clintonG" <cs*********@RE MOVETHISTEXTmet romilwaukee.com > wrote in message
news:ud******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP10.phx.gbl...
Thanks for your comments Scott.

If I create a new project using the name ArbitraryProjec tName I could
then
rename the root namespace to CompanyName.Tec hnologyName easily enough but
VSN2003 will name the assembly ArbitraryProjec tName.dll. That's where I
am
still hung up. What am I missing?

<%= Clinton Gallagher

"Scott M." <No****@NoSpam. com> wrote in message
news:uQ******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
>I think you are confusing the names of the project, solution, project
>folder, assembly and namespace.
>
> When you create a new project, you are asked to provide a name for that
> project. The name you supply is the name that VS.NET uses for the
> solution, project, project folder, root namespace and assembly. HOWEVER, > you can change these values after the project has been created. So,
> you
> could just make a new project called what you'd like the project folder to > be called and then after the project is created, you can easily change the > assembly and root namespace names as well as the project and solution
> names.
>
> Also, just because your local directory is called one thing, doesn't mean > that when you copy the project to the production server, you must use the > same directory name.
>
>
> "clintonG" <cs*********@RE MOVETHISTEXTmet romilwaukee.com > wrote in message > news:%2******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP12.phx.gbl. ..
>> Microsoft recommends CompanyName.Tec hnologyName[.Feature][.Design] and it >> all comes down to not breaking the inheritence model if I am not
>> mistaken. VSN2003 however tells the compiler to use the name of the
>> project as the name of the .dll the project compiles to.
>>
>> Developing on XP Pro in the Default Website would most commonly result in >> a file system path such as...
>>
>> InetPub/wwwroot/CompanyName.Tec hnologyName/default.aspx
>>
>> ...if I named the directory containing the project's files the same as
>> the name of the project itself, i.e the name of the project being
>> CompanyName.Tec hnologyName and the name of the directory where its
>> file
>> resources are located also CompanyName.Tec hnologyName.
>>
>> That seems to make sense to me but only on the local XP Pro
>> development
>> 'server.' This naming schema breaks down when deploying the project's
>> directory and file resources to the production web server which is
>> provided as a hosted service.
>>
>> Its clumsy to request a page from the production server as http://
>> companyname.com/companyname.tec hnologyname/default.aspx. I've never seen >> it done. So how do you resolve Namespace naming, project naming and so
>> on? After all this time 1.1 has matured I still don't get it and haven't >> found any documents that discuss this context.
>>
>> <%= Clinton Gallagher
>>
>> [1]
>> http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...guidelines.asp >>
>
>



Jul 21 '05 #5
You would rename the assembly in the same location that you would rename the
root namespace, the project's properties dialog window.
"clintonG" <cs*********@RE MOVETHISTEXTmet romilwaukee.com > wrote in message
news:ud******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP10.phx.gbl...
Thanks for your comments Scott.

If I create a new project using the name ArbitraryProjec tName I could then
rename the root namespace to CompanyName.Tec hnologyName easily enough but
VSN2003 will name the assembly ArbitraryProjec tName.dll. That's where I am
still hung up. What am I missing?

<%= Clinton Gallagher

"Scott M." <No****@NoSpam. com> wrote in message
news:uQ******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
I think you are confusing the names of the project, solution, project
folder, assembly and namespace.

When you create a new project, you are asked to provide a name for that
project. The name you supply is the name that VS.NET uses for the
solution, project, project folder, root namespace and assembly. HOWEVER,
you can change these values after the project has been created. So, you
could just make a new project called what you'd like the project folder
to be called and then after the project is created, you can easily change
the assembly and root namespace names as well as the project and solution
names.

Also, just because your local directory is called one thing, doesn't mean
that when you copy the project to the production server, you must use the
same directory name.
"clintonG" <cs*********@RE MOVETHISTEXTmet romilwaukee.com > wrote in
message news:%2******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP12.phx.gbl. ..
Microsoft recommends CompanyName.Tec hnologyName[.Feature][.Design] and
it all comes down to not breaking the inheritence model if I am not
mistaken. VSN2003 however tells the compiler to use the name of the
project as the name of the .dll the project compiles to.

Developing on XP Pro in the Default Website would most commonly result
in a file system path such as...

InetPub/wwwroot/CompanyName.Tec hnologyName/default.aspx

...if I named the directory containing the project's files the same as
the name of the project itself, i.e the name of the project being
CompanyName.Tec hnologyName and the name of the directory where its file
resources are located also CompanyName.Tec hnologyName.

That seems to make sense to me but only on the local XP Pro development
'server.' This naming schema breaks down when deploying the project's
directory and file resources to the production web server which is
provided as a hosted service.

Its clumsy to request a page from the production server as http://
companyname.com/companyname.tec hnologyname/default.aspx. I've never seen
it done. So how do you resolve Namespace naming, project naming and so
on? After all this time 1.1 has matured I still don't get it and haven't
found any documents that discuss this context.

<%= Clinton Gallagher

[1]
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...guidelines.asp



Jul 21 '05 #6
Thanks. I think I got it all straightened out. This MSDN document [1] helped
describe the heirarchy.

<%= Clinton Gallagher

[1]
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...guidelines.asp

"Scott M." <No****@NoSpam. com> wrote in message
news:u4******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
You would rename the assembly in the same location that you would rename
the root namespace, the project's properties dialog window.
"clintonG" <cs*********@RE MOVETHISTEXTmet romilwaukee.com > wrote in message
news:ud******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP10.phx.gbl...
Thanks for your comments Scott.

If I create a new project using the name ArbitraryProjec tName I could
then rename the root namespace to CompanyName.Tec hnologyName easily
enough but VSN2003 will name the assembly ArbitraryProjec tName.dll.
That's where I am still hung up. What am I missing?

<%= Clinton Gallagher

"Scott M." <No****@NoSpam. com> wrote in message
news:uQ******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
I think you are confusing the names of the project, solution, project
folder, assembly and namespace.

When you create a new project, you are asked to provide a name for that
project. The name you supply is the name that VS.NET uses for the
solution, project, project folder, root namespace and assembly.
HOWEVER, you can change these values after the project has been created.
So, you could just make a new project called what you'd like the project
folder to be called and then after the project is created, you can
easily change the assembly and root namespace names as well as the
project and solution names.

Also, just because your local directory is called one thing, doesn't
mean that when you copy the project to the production server, you must
use the same directory name.
"clintonG" <cs*********@RE MOVETHISTEXTmet romilwaukee.com > wrote in
message news:%2******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP12.phx.gbl. ..
Microsoft recommends CompanyName.Tec hnologyName[.Feature][.Design] and
it all comes down to not breaking the inheritence model if I am not
mistaken. VSN2003 however tells the compiler to use the name of the
project as the name of the .dll the project compiles to.

Developing on XP Pro in the Default Website would most commonly result
in a file system path such as...

InetPub/wwwroot/CompanyName.Tec hnologyName/default.aspx

...if I named the directory containing the project's files the same as
the name of the project itself, i.e the name of the project being
CompanyName.Tec hnologyName and the name of the directory where its file
resources are located also CompanyName.Tec hnologyName.

That seems to make sense to me but only on the local XP Pro development
'server.' This naming schema breaks down when deploying the project's
directory and file resources to the production web server which is
provided as a hosted service.

Its clumsy to request a page from the production server as http://
companyname.com/companyname.tec hnologyname/default.aspx. I've never
seen it done. So how do you resolve Namespace naming, project naming
and so on? After all this time 1.1 has matured I still don't get it and
haven't found any documents that discuss this context.

<%= Clinton Gallagher

[1]
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...guidelines.asp



Jul 21 '05 #7

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