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How launch a Local application

Hi,

I'd like to launch a local application with a HTML page without any
user popup validation, just a user click. I know that I can do it with
a applet, ActiveX or a flash but I'd like manage it with on
javascript. Do you know how?

Thank you in advance.
Jul 23 '05 #1
6 3759
In article <bc**************************@posting.google.com >,
Jean-Michel <jm*****@yahoo.com> wrote:
Hi,

I'd like to launch a local application with a HTML page without any
user popup validation, just a user click. I know that I can do it with
a applet, ActiveX or a flash but I'd like manage it with on
javascript. Do you know how?

Thank you in advance.


What would keep you from starting a disk maintenence program and
deleting the entire disk?

--
Dennis Marks
http://www.dcs-chico.com/~denmarks/
To reply change none to dcsi.
-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
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Jul 23 '05 #2
What would keep you from starting a disk maintenence program and
deleting the entire disk?


That brings up another question: What's the worst thing you can do in
JavaScript?
-Gernot
Jul 23 '05 #3
On Thu, 29 Apr 2004 18:00:08 +0200, Gernot Frisch wrote:
What would keep you from starting a disk maintenence program and
deleting the entire disk?


That brings up another question: What's the worst thing you can do in
JavaScript?
-Gernot


Crash the machine.

--
i.m.
The USA Patriot Act is the most unpatriotic act in American history.

Jul 23 '05 #4
Gernot Frisch wrote:
What would keep you from starting a disk maintenence program and
deleting the entire disk?


That brings up another question: What's the worst thing you can do in
JavaScript?


On a web browser, make anything important depend on its successful
execution.

Unless you meant: What is the most directly harmful/destructive thing
you can do with javascript? Insofar as the above doesn't already cover
that; there are security holes in some browsers that do allow scripts to
do nasty things to the user's computer (mostly exploiting ActiveX), but
they get patched. Crashing (or locking up) the browser isn't a very nice
thing to do (almost all browsers can be deliberately crashed by a script
one way or another), and consuming all of the available memory will
usually bring a browser to its knees (along with the OS sometimes).

Apart form that there are no shortage of anti-social things that can be
done with scripts. How anti-social something is depends to some extent
on the user's attitude and habits but popular candidates include:-

1. Interfering with the context menu.

2. Opening pop-up windows (especially advertising, surveys and
other unwanted intrusions).

3. Attempting to close the user's existing browser window
(particularly if the attempt is successful).

4. Opening windows with restricted features (chrome).

5. Re-sizing and/or moving existing browser windows.

6. Opening full screen windows. (or attempting to position new
windows in stupid places, such as the middle of the desktop).

7. Trapping the user into some action or sequence (usually filling
in forms) by re-focusing HTML elements/window whenever the user
attempts to do something else (which is more important to the
user at the time, else they wouldn't want to do it).

8. Modifying browser/control behaviour, keyboard shortcuts, etc,
so that interactions do not produce the normal (expected) results.

Richard.
Jul 23 '05 #5
> 3. Attempting to close the user's existing browser window
(particularly if the attempt is successful).
That's mean.
6. Opening full screen windows. (or attempting to position new
windows in stupid places, such as the middle of the desktop).
That's been solved in Firefox, phew!

7. Trapping the user into some action or sequence (usually filling
in forms) by re-focusing HTML elements/window whenever the user
attempts to do something else (which is more important to the
user at the time, else they wouldn't want to do it).
Ahrgh! I know that. And these "Back-Button" fixes, where dummies get
trapped on a site. That's really mean!
8. Modifying browser/control behaviour, keyboard shortcuts, etc,
so that interactions do not produce the normal (expected)

results.

Can it? Well, that's definitely not what I would allow it to do...

As we're going OT here, one more Q: Cookies. Is there propably any
cookie that tells my email address. Or in other words: Can a
JavaScript get my email address without having me explicitly typing
it?
-Gernot
Jul 23 '05 #6
Gernot Frisch wrote:
As we're going OT here, one more Q: Cookies. Is there propably any
cookie that tells my email address. Or in other words: Can a
JavaScript get my email address without having me explicitly typing
it?
-Gernot


I think there's a lot of confusion about what cookies are, and what they
do. A cookie contains information sent to the client by the server, or
information gathered by client-side script (assuming client-side
scripting is enabled). Cookies can only contain information that:

a) the server already knows about you (your IP address, your user agent,
etc)
b) information you have explicitly given to the server (ie - you entered
your E-mail address in an input box and submitted a form, then the
E-mail address could be stored in a cookie)
c) information gathered by client-side script with all the limitations
of scripting in whatever security environment you are operating in

In other words, if client-side script or the server don't know your
E-mail address (and they don't unless you *tell* them), then the E-mail
address can't be stored in a cookie. Even if you provide your E-mail
address to one server and it stores it in a cookie, other Web sites from
other domains will have no access to the information stored in that
cookie (assuming security is working the way it should in the browser,
there are a number of known, unpatched vulnerabilities in Internet
Explorer that would let one site access the cookies of another site if
they know the precise location and name of the cookie file).

--
| Grant Wagner <gw*****@agricoreunited.com>

* Client-side Javascript and Netscape 4 DOM Reference available at:
*
http://devedge.netscape.com/library/...ce/frames.html

* Internet Explorer DOM Reference available at:
*
http://msdn.microsoft.com/workshop/a...ence_entry.asp

* Netscape 6/7 DOM Reference available at:
* http://www.mozilla.org/docs/dom/domref/
* Tips for upgrading JavaScript for Netscape 7 / Mozilla
* http://www.mozilla.org/docs/web-deve...upgrade_2.html
Jul 23 '05 #7

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