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Is it necessary for me to learn JAVA?

I hope this is the correct place to post this:
I am developing a web site for a e-commerce business I will be
running. The site I'm setting up will be 50% store, 50% content. I'm
not sure which shopping cart I'll be using yet (am looking at
os-commerce and miva) but the other part will be content. I will be
writing reviews of products, articles on the industry, and someday may
have some blogging and forums and advertising. I have to add that I
am not much into programming and I want a good web site but most of
all what is important to me is ease of use and a easy to update web
page. I will be using Macromeda Studio 8 to develop it (dreamweaver
and flash)
I know years ago Java seemed to be used a lot but will this be
necessary for me to learn? It is more for big web applications?
Aug 17 '06 #1
4 3210
MarkW wrote:
I hope this is the correct place to post this:
I am developing a web site for a e-commerce business I will be
running. The site I'm setting up will be 50% store, 50% content. I'm
not sure which shopping cart I'll be using yet (am looking at
os-commerce and miva) but the other part will be content. I will be
writing reviews of products, articles on the industry, and someday may
have some blogging and forums and advertising. I have to add that I
am not much into programming and I want a good web site but most of
all what is important to me is ease of use and a easy to update web
page. I will be using Macromeda Studio 8 to develop it (dreamweaver
and flash)
I know years ago Java seemed to be used a lot but will this be
necessary for me to learn? It is more for big web applications?
Not really, PHP, Javascript and HTML work well together. You can easily
add Ajax. When you mention os-commerce this is a wiki application if I
remember correctly.

It seems that, to me, J2EE is over kill and only needed by big corps
that have the $money and time to spend to maintain and upgrade it and as
an aside keep people their jobs..

I am a Java programmer for years but I am starting to shy away from the
over bloated J2EE and the technical requirements that is requires. If
not for its own technology sake.

Their are some nice Wiki's out there that will well suite you particular
environment and grow quite nicely. As a matter of fact I am using pmWiki
that was ten times easier to install and maintain that my prior
Jsp\Servelet application I ran out of Tomcat.

In my 29 years of being in this business I feel, not to sound like sour
grapes, that J2EE is good only for technology for technology sake. There
are to many other alternatives that are far superior in all aspects.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki

--
Thanks in Advance...
IchBin, Pocono Lake, Pa, USA http://weconsultants.phpnet.us
'If there is one, Knowledge is the "Fountain of Youth"'
-William E. Taylor, Regular Guy (1952-)
Aug 17 '06 #2
Thanks for the advice. The more I'm reading I'm learning that a off
the shelf solution is best for the e-commerce that I'm doing so I'm
going to spend some time doing that.
Aug 17 '06 #3
A refreshingly honest answer.

IchBin wrote:
MarkW wrote:
>I hope this is the correct place to post this:
I am developing a web site for a e-commerce business I will be
running. The site I'm setting up will be 50% store, 50% content. I'm not
sure which shopping cart I'll be using yet (am looking at
os-commerce and miva) but the other part will be content. I will be
writing reviews of products, articles on the industry, and someday
may have some blogging and forums and advertising. I have to add
that I am not much into programming and I want a good web site but
most of all what is important to me is ease of use and a easy to
update web page. I will be using Macromeda Studio 8 to develop it
(dreamweaver and flash)
I know years ago Java seemed to be used a lot but will this be
necessary for me to learn? It is more for big web applications?

Not really, PHP, Javascript and HTML work well together. You can
easily add Ajax. When you mention os-commerce this is a wiki
application if I remember correctly.

It seems that, to me, J2EE is over kill and only needed by big corps
that have the $money and time to spend to maintain and upgrade it and
as an aside keep people their jobs..

I am a Java programmer for years but I am starting to shy away from
the over bloated J2EE and the technical requirements that is
requires. If not for its own technology sake.

Their are some nice Wiki's out there that will well suite you
particular environment and grow quite nicely. As a matter of fact I
am using pmWiki that was ten times easier to install and maintain
that my prior Jsp\Servelet application I ran out of Tomcat.

In my 29 years of being in this business I feel, not to sound like
sour grapes, that J2EE is good only for technology for technology
sake. There are to many other alternatives that are far superior in
all aspects.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki
--
May all beings, in or out of the womb, be well, happy and peaceful.
http://mysite.verizon.net/tharpa/
Aug 18 '06 #4
"MarkW" <ma*****@RemoveNoSpamcomcast.netwrote in message
news:c9********************************@4ax.com...
>I hope this is the correct place to post this:
I am developing a web site for a e-commerce business I will be
running. The site I'm setting up will be 50% store, 50% content. I'm
not sure which shopping cart I'll be using yet (am looking at
os-commerce and miva) but the other part will be content. I will be
writing reviews of products, articles on the industry, and someday may
have some blogging and forums and advertising. I have to add that I
am not much into programming and I want a good web site but most of
all what is important to me is ease of use and a easy to update web
page. I will be using Macromeda Studio 8 to develop it (dreamweaver
and flash)
I know years ago Java seemed to be used a lot but will this be
necessary for me to learn? It is more for big web applications?
Java is a mature language with a massive API (read: many useful functions
already written for you) and dozens of web application development
frameworks, open source toolkits, etc. You can easily find all the
components you'll need, and very powerful Integrated Development
Environments (IDE's), all for FREE, to allow you to build as sophisticated a
website as you wish. Unlike .NET, you don't have to plunk down thousands of
$$$ to get the tools you need.

HOWEVER...

If you are new to Java, and if you already know PHP, and if you are going to
be the only developer (or one of a small team), then you should consider
developing in PHP. Why? It's very easy to get results quickly without
spending months "woodshedding" with a fat stack of Java books (ask me how I
know). PHP is maturing quickly, and the PEAR library is growing rapidly.
PHP's tight integration with MySQL makes for very quick coding of
data-driven sites.

You should be able to take existing open-source web applications such as
OSCommerce, Joomla, phpBB, Coppermine, etc and "glue" them together as
needed, using CSS stylesheets to make everything look seamless from page to
page. Start here: http://www.opensourcecms.com/

Hope this helps
Dec 23 '06 #5

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