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CSS shared borders

P: n/a
What do people do who have large websites and use CSS, without using
shared borders, how do you update navigation, etc? I'm volunteering to
build several sites and want to set it up to enable others down the
line to easily keep it up. Even though my sites won't be large,
changeing the navigation on each page to update it gets old. Any
suggestions? I do you FrontPage for visual setup with CSS.
Jul 20 '05 #1
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P: n/a
Cabintrail wrote:
What do people do who have large websites and use CSS, without using
shared borders, how do you update navigation, etc?


Shared borders are good IIRC, aside from their dependency on a certain
Microsoft product notorious for producing low quality HTML.

Alternatives: http://www.allmyfaqs.com/faq.pl?Incl...ile_in_another

--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
Cabintrail wrote:
What do people do who have large websites and use CSS, without using
shared borders, how do you update navigation, etc?


Shared borders are good IIRC, aside from their dependency on a certain
Microsoft product notorious for producing low quality HTML.

Alternatives: http://www.allmyfaqs.com/faq.pl?Incl...ile_in_another

--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
Cabintrail wrote in
<78**************************@posting.google.com >
What do people do who have large websites and use CSS, without using
shared borders, how do you update navigation, etc? I'm volunteering to
build several sites and want to set it up to enable others down the
line to easily keep it up. Even though my sites won't be large,
changeing the navigation on each page to update it gets old. Any
suggestions? I do you FrontPage for visual setup with CSS.


SSI - dead easy - http://www.bignosebird.com/sdocs/include.shtml

--
PeterMcC
If you feel that any of the above is incorrect,
inappropriate or offensive in any way,
please ignore it and accept my apologies.
Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
Cabintrail wrote in
<78**************************@posting.google.com >
What do people do who have large websites and use CSS, without using
shared borders, how do you update navigation, etc? I'm volunteering to
build several sites and want to set it up to enable others down the
line to easily keep it up. Even though my sites won't be large,
changeing the navigation on each page to update it gets old. Any
suggestions? I do you FrontPage for visual setup with CSS.


SSI - dead easy - http://www.bignosebird.com/sdocs/include.shtml

--
PeterMcC
If you feel that any of the above is incorrect,
inappropriate or offensive in any way,
please ignore it and accept my apologies.
Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
"Cabintrail" <ca********@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:78**************************@posting.google.c om...
What do people do who have large websites and use CSS, without using
shared borders, how do you update navigation, etc? I'm volunteering to
build several sites and want to set it up to enable others down the
line to easily keep it up. Even though my sites won't be large,
changeing the navigation on each page to update it gets old. Any
suggestions? I do you FrontPage for visual setup with CSS.


If your key requirement is easy upkeep by other people, using FP
is probably a mistake -- unless you are certain that they will
always be FP users and will have the same FP release. It would be
much better for them (and for you) to build the site using a
standard-compliant non-WYSIWYG editor.

You can always import standard-compliant code into FP or any other
editing tool.

Somebody else has already pointed you to
http://www.allmyfaqs.com/faq.pl?Incl...ile_in_another
I strongly recommend using PHP to include non-variant blocks
of markup. It's portable, free and very easy to learn.

'Large' sites (my arbitrary definition is more than 10,000 pages)
are built with tools which are quite different from FP, but any
size website can be built using the method suggested above.
As an example, I manage a site which has about 25,000 pages --
all of which have common menus and stylesheets.

Each page begins with <?php require('header.php'); ?> and ends
<?php require('footer.php'); ?>

The header.php file contains the whole of the HEAD markup,
including a link to the common stylesheet. Text for the title, etc,
is passed in as a variable, eg:
<title><?php echo $ptitle ; ?></title>
The site-wide menu is also in this file.

The footer.php file contains a secondary menu, and other site-wide
data.

It would probably take you no more than one day to understand and
implement a similar solution. After that, you will have a scaleable
management system that you can apply to most web projects.
Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
"Cabintrail" <ca********@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:78**************************@posting.google.c om...
What do people do who have large websites and use CSS, without using
shared borders, how do you update navigation, etc? I'm volunteering to
build several sites and want to set it up to enable others down the
line to easily keep it up. Even though my sites won't be large,
changeing the navigation on each page to update it gets old. Any
suggestions? I do you FrontPage for visual setup with CSS.


If your key requirement is easy upkeep by other people, using FP
is probably a mistake -- unless you are certain that they will
always be FP users and will have the same FP release. It would be
much better for them (and for you) to build the site using a
standard-compliant non-WYSIWYG editor.

You can always import standard-compliant code into FP or any other
editing tool.

Somebody else has already pointed you to
http://www.allmyfaqs.com/faq.pl?Incl...ile_in_another
I strongly recommend using PHP to include non-variant blocks
of markup. It's portable, free and very easy to learn.

'Large' sites (my arbitrary definition is more than 10,000 pages)
are built with tools which are quite different from FP, but any
size website can be built using the method suggested above.
As an example, I manage a site which has about 25,000 pages --
all of which have common menus and stylesheets.

Each page begins with <?php require('header.php'); ?> and ends
<?php require('footer.php'); ?>

The header.php file contains the whole of the HEAD markup,
including a link to the common stylesheet. Text for the title, etc,
is passed in as a variable, eg:
<title><?php echo $ptitle ; ?></title>
The site-wide menu is also in this file.

The footer.php file contains a secondary menu, and other site-wide
data.

It would probably take you no more than one day to understand and
implement a similar solution. After that, you will have a scaleable
management system that you can apply to most web projects.
Jul 20 '05 #7

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