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MPG link - QuickTime problem

P: n/a
Hi

I've written an HTML page that has a link to an MPG file, to be burned
onto a "Demo CD". The MPG file is quite big - 500MB. On my computer,
it works fine - clicking the link opens up Windows Media Player, which
starts showing the video. But on another computer, the link opens up a
new browser page, and shows the video as an embedded QuickTime video.
The problem is (I think this might be QuickTime's fault) that it takes
about 5 minutes before it starts showing the video. I think QuickTime
must load or buffer the whole file. This is not good - I need the
video to start playing immediately.

The HTML link I am using is:
<A HREF="DataFiles/Seminar.mpg" TARGET="_blank">View the Seminar
Video</A>

Is there anything wrong with the HTML link? Is there any way I can
force the system to a) not use QuickTime or b) not embed the image or
c) prompt the user as to what to do?? Basically, I just want the video
to run properly!!

Thanks
Sean
Jul 23 '05 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
On 21 Oct 2004 01:18:28 -0700, Sean <pl*******@yahoo.com> wrote:
I've written an HTML page that has a link to an MPG file, to be burned
onto a "Demo CD".
If this isn't going onto the WWW then it is off topic for this group.
The MPG file is quite big - 500MB. On my computer,
it works fine - clicking the link opens up Windows Media Player, which
starts showing the video. But on another computer, the link opens up a
new browser page, and shows the video as an embedded QuickTime video.
Different configurations. Both are presumably doing what the user of that
browser wants them to do with MPEGs.
The problem is (I think this might be QuickTime's fault) that it takes
about 5 minutes before it starts showing the video. I think QuickTime
must load or buffer the whole file.
Again that's a configuration issue. I'm sure that QuickTime has an option
that allows the user to set the amount of buffering to be done.
This is not good - I need the video to start playing immediately.
"Need"? What will happen if it doesn't?
The HTML link I am using is:
<A HREF="DataFiles/Seminar.mpg" TARGET="_blank">View the Seminar
Video</A>

Is there anything wrong with the HTML link?
No it's mostly fine, though _blank may be troublesome.

If the user has their browser configured to launch MPEGs in an external
application, or to save them, then you've created a new, totally empty
window for no purpose.

If the user has their browser configured to show MPEGs inside the browser
then they may want it to use the main window but you've given them no way
of doing that - if you omit the target attribute then they can choose
whether to view the MPEG in the same or a new window at the time they
click the link.
Is there any way I can force
No. You can't force anything on the WWW.
the system to a) not use QuickTime or
No. That option is up to the user's configuration.
b) not embed the image or
No. That option is up to the user's configuration.
c) prompt the user as to what to do??


No. That option is up to the user's configuration.

The user has already chosen what they want to happen with MPEGs, you
should respect that choice.

Steve
Jul 23 '05 #2

P: n/a
pl*******@yahoo.com (Sean) wrote:
I've written an HTML page that has a link to an MPG file, to be burned
onto a "Demo CD". The MPG file is quite big - 500MB.
Why? If it is to be retrieved via the Internet then surely you can
compress it using a more appropriate format. Broadband users will
appreciate it since it makes retrieval much faster, and it costs them
less or consumes less of their download allowance, and it may become
usable for non broadband clients also, unlike currently.
On my computer, it works fine
Who is it for, you or others? If it's for others then what it does when
you access it from your local file system is irrelevant.
- clicking the link opens up Windows Media Player, which
starts showing the video. But on another computer, the link opens up a
new browser page, and shows the video as an embedded QuickTime video.
It's up to each client how it want's to handle content, don't interfere
with that choice. Mpeg videos can be played with pretty much all media
players, leave the user to decide which he likes best.
The problem is (I think this might be QuickTime's fault) that it takes
about 5 minutes before it starts showing the video. I think QuickTime
must load or buffer the whole file. This is not good - I need the
video to start playing immediately.
First compress the content appropriately, secondly linking directly to
the video content *should* result in a full download before playback
commences. Some formats other than MPEG video have associated redirector
formats that can initiate streaming:
http://www.spartanicus.utvinternet.ie/streaming.htm
Is there anything wrong with the HTML link? Is there any way I can
force the system to a) not use QuickTime or b)
None of your business.
not embed the image
Unlikely to happen, but again none of your business.
or c) prompt the user as to what to do??


Same again.

--
Spartanicus
Jul 23 '05 #3

P: n/a
Look. I'm not trying to do anything evil on the user's computer.
Thanks for your help, but I think you missed the point. It's quite
simple, really.

I have a webpage on a CD that I will be distributing. The page has
links to mpg files on the CD. I want the user to be able to click the
link and it plays the mpg, in a different window (browser or
application) so that when it finished, the CD contents page is still
showing and he can click on another one.

The link behaves differently on different computers, obviously. I've
only tried it on two, mine and another computer. That's how
development works, Spartanicus - you do something, and then you test
it. What kind of stupid snide comment were you trying to make by
saying "Who is it for, you or others?"?? By that logic, am I supposed
to test the software on EVERY user's computer that is ever going to
use it?

Apologies for the offence, but I didn't appreciate the 'high-horse'
tone of either of your replies. I do appreciate the help, though.

Because the file is so big, it takes ages to load into QuickTime
(where it is embedded in a browser window), whereas Win Media Player
plays it immediately. Waiting 5 minutes is not creating a good "user
experience". I appreciate user's have their own settings for a reason;
I was just wondering if there was anything I could do to make the damn
thing work better.

I take it the answer is an emphatic "No"?!


Spartanicus <me@privacy.net> wrote in message news:<2k********************************@news.spar tanicus.utvinternet.ie>...
pl*******@yahoo.com (Sean) wrote:
I've written an HTML page that has a link to an MPG file, to be burned
onto a "Demo CD". The MPG file is quite big - 500MB.


Why? If it is to be retrieved via the Internet then surely you can
compress it using a more appropriate format. Broadband users will
appreciate it since it makes retrieval much faster, and it costs them
less or consumes less of their download allowance, and it may become
usable for non broadband clients also, unlike currently.
On my computer, it works fine


Who is it for, you or others? If it's for others then what it does when
you access it from your local file system is irrelevant.
- clicking the link opens up Windows Media Player, which
starts showing the video. But on another computer, the link opens up a
new browser page, and shows the video as an embedded QuickTime video.


It's up to each client how it want's to handle content, don't interfere
with that choice. Mpeg videos can be played with pretty much all media
players, leave the user to decide which he likes best.
The problem is (I think this might be QuickTime's fault) that it takes
about 5 minutes before it starts showing the video. I think QuickTime
must load or buffer the whole file. This is not good - I need the
video to start playing immediately.


First compress the content appropriately, secondly linking directly to
the video content *should* result in a full download before playback
commences. Some formats other than MPEG video have associated redirector
formats that can initiate streaming:
http://www.spartanicus.utvinternet.ie/streaming.htm
Is there anything wrong with the HTML link? Is there any way I can
force the system to a) not use QuickTime or b)


None of your business.
not embed the image


Unlikely to happen, but again none of your business.
or c) prompt the user as to what to do??


Same again.

Jul 23 '05 #4

P: n/a
Sean wrote:
Because the file is so big, it takes ages to load into QuickTime
(where it is embedded in a browser window), whereas Win Media Player
plays it immediately.


That's a bit odd. I'm sure there are things you can do to fix the problem.
take a look at this, for example:
<http://www.apple.com/quicktime/tools_tips/tutorials/faststart.html>

Alternatively, split the video content up into separate chapters with a
separate HTML page for each one. That way you can add useful features like a
navigation menu. (I assume your 500 MB video is rather L-O-N-G.).

What the heck, why not do both?

--
Philip Ronan
ph***********@virgin.net
(Please remove the "z"s if replying by email)
Jul 23 '05 #5

P: n/a

"Sean" <pl*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:36**************************@posting.google.c om...
Look. I'm not trying to do anything evil on the user's computer.
Thanks for your help, but I think you missed the point. It's quite
simple, really.

I have a webpage on a CD that I will be distributing. The page has
links to mpg files on the CD. I want the user to be able to click the
link and it plays the mpg, in a different window (browser or
application) so that when it finished, the CD contents page is still
showing and he can click on another one.

The link behaves differently on different computers, obviously. I've
only tried it on two, mine and another computer. That's how
development works, Spartanicus - you do something, and then you test
it. What kind of stupid snide comment were you trying to make by
saying "Who is it for, you or others?"?? By that logic, am I supposed
to test the software on EVERY user's computer that is ever going to
use it?

Apologies for the offence, but I didn't appreciate the 'high-horse'
tone of either of your replies. I do appreciate the help, though.

Because the file is so big, it takes ages to load into QuickTime
(where it is embedded in a browser window), whereas Win Media Player
plays it immediately. Waiting 5 minutes is not creating a good "user
experience".
And yet, the user has configured his system so that MPG files are played
using QuickTime. Obviously *he's* satisfied with it. Maybe there's a reason
for it: maybe he tries to avoid using Microsoft applications whenever
possible. Maybe he doesn't like Media Player's spyware aspect. Maybe he
doesn't even have it.

The question boils down to which is more important: that your users see the
presentation at all, or that they see it the way you think they should see
it?
I appreciate user's have their own settings for a reason;
I was just wondering if there was anything I could do to make the damn
thing work better.

I take it the answer is an emphatic "No"?!


More or less.

Jul 23 '05 #6

P: n/a
begin quote from Sean in <36**************************@posting.google.com >:
I've written an HTML page that has a link to an MPG file, to be burned
onto a "Demo CD".


If it's not being served over the WWW, then it is off-topic for this
newsgroup.

--
Shawn K. Quinn
Jul 23 '05 #7

P: n/a
In comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html,alt.html Sean said:
Look. I'm not trying to do anything evil on the user's computer.


why the hell not?
--
v o i c e s
Jul 23 '05 #8

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.