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Future of C and object-oriented programming

P: n/a
Does C have a future? I'd like to think so, but nobody seems to agree
with me. Of course, I don't use C in my profession, and maybe I
wouldn't be using it if I had the pressure to actually produce things
with deadlines and stuff. Hmm. That's a depressing thought.

I can't stand OOP. Yes, it is beautiful in theory, and it might make
sense for huge projects with many people involved, but I don't want
anything to do with it. (I switched to C from C++ AFTER having learnt
OOP properly, BTW.)

I should probably flesh this post out more, but what the hell... What
do you think? Is there a future for non-OO programmers like myself? I
know that you can write "object-oriented" code in C, but hopefully, you
get my point.

How often is C used today for game development for consoles/Windows,
and for general application development? And no, I don't mean "C/C++",
but pure, real C.

--
http://www.kimmoa.se/

Jan 4 '07 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
"Dylan not Bob." (tm)

No no... I mean Dylan *like* Bob Dylan but not Bob.

"The Future is Dylan but not Bob."(tm) :-)
We all know that we need something new then C/C++ in the future.
The question is, what.
I think Dylan can do it.
Dylan will do it.
Dylan do it right now.

Read more about Dylan:
But it's a "new" language http://www.opendylan.org/
http://icfpc.plt-scheme.org/
See also http://chaosradio.ccc.de/cre031.html (german)
http://events.ccc.de/congress/2005/f...ts/800.de.html
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interna...amming_Contest

By the way. C++ is object *oriented*. (For example, data encapsulation
is not OO-like. We all know, that objects and data can and do exist
beside each others. Like in real language: Objects, Subjects, etc.)

C will still exist. But more and more, we all know, that we have to use
somethings really better. Also not C# and .NET and the like. Theses are
well known "old" languages. Like Fortran, C, C++, Pascal, Ada, etc. etc.

So, C is still a basic thing if you need to know how things works on
assembly/machine/pysical point-of-view. (Sure, you can write high-level
thins. But use malloc and the like does'nt made me happy.)

In short: The future is Dylan for Operating-System things (write an OS
like NT, Linux, MacOS/X etc.) and a scripting language like Python for
scripting things.

..NET, Java, C/C++, Pascal, Delphi, Perl, etc. are all languages based on
very old concepts.
KimmoA wrote:
Does C have a future? I'd like to think so, but nobody seems to agree
with me. Of course, I don't use C in my profession, and maybe I
wouldn't be using it if I had the pressure to actually produce things
with deadlines and stuff. Hmm. That's a depressing thought.

I can't stand OOP. Yes, it is beautiful in theory, and it might make
sense for huge projects with many people involved, but I don't want
anything to do with it. (I switched to C from C++ AFTER having learnt
OOP properly, BTW.)

I should probably flesh this post out more, but what the hell... What
do you think? Is there a future for non-OO programmers like myself? I
know that you can write "object-oriented" code in C, but hopefully, you
get my point.

How often is C used today for game development for consoles/Windows,
and for general application development? And no, I don't mean "C/C++",
but pure, real C.

--
http://www.kimmoa.se/
Jan 4 '07 #2

P: n/a

A book, Dylan language.
http://www.opendylan.org/books/dpg/db_2.html

btw. it is possible to write in OOP like and functions like C.

But the OOP like is really OO not as in C++, Java, C# etc. !
This is why many people dont like OO-things, because of the poor
implementation in languages like C++ Java Delphi, etc.

Michael M. wrote:
"Dylan not Bob." (tm)

No no... I mean Dylan *like* Bob Dylan but not Bob.

"The Future is Dylan but not Bob."(tm) :-)
We all know that we need something new then C/C++ in the future.
The question is, what.
I think Dylan can do it.
Dylan will do it.
Dylan do it right now.

Read more about Dylan:
But it's a "new" language http://www.opendylan.org/
http://icfpc.plt-scheme.org/
See also http://chaosradio.ccc.de/cre031.html (german)
http://events.ccc.de/congress/2005/f...ts/800.de.html
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interna...amming_Contest
By the way. C++ is object *oriented*. (For example, data encapsulation
is not OO-like. We all know, that objects and data can and do exist
beside each others. Like in real language: Objects, Subjects, etc.)

C will still exist. But more and more, we all know, that we have to use
somethings really better. Also not C# and .NET and the like. Theses are
well known "old" languages. Like Fortran, C, C++, Pascal, Ada, etc. etc.

So, C is still a basic thing if you need to know how things works on
assembly/machine/pysical point-of-view. (Sure, you can write high-level
thins. But use malloc and the like does'nt made me happy.)

In short: The future is Dylan for Operating-System things (write an OS
like NT, Linux, MacOS/X etc.) and a scripting language like Python for
scripting things.

.NET, Java, C/C++, Pascal, Delphi, Perl, etc. are all languages based on
very old concepts.
KimmoA wrote:
>Does C have a future? I'd like to think so, but nobody seems to agree
with me. Of course, I don't use C in my profession, and maybe I
wouldn't be using it if I had the pressure to actually produce things
with deadlines and stuff. Hmm. That's a depressing thought.

I can't stand OOP. Yes, it is beautiful in theory, and it might make
sense for huge projects with many people involved, but I don't want
anything to do with it. (I switched to C from C++ AFTER having learnt
OOP properly, BTW.)

I should probably flesh this post out more, but what the hell... What
do you think? Is there a future for non-OO programmers like myself? I
know that you can write "object-oriented" code in C, but hopefully, you
get my point.

How often is C used today for game development for consoles/Windows,
and for general application development? And no, I don't mean "C/C++",
but pure, real C.

--
http://www.kimmoa.se/
Jan 4 '07 #3

P: n/a
KimmoA said:
Does C have a future?
Yes.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Jan 4 '07 #4

P: n/a
On Thu, 04 Jan 2007 04:53:18 +0000, Richard Heathfield wrote:
>KimmoA said:
>Does C have a future?

Yes.
At least it will outlive its successors (C++, Java, C#, D, ...).
Jan 4 '07 #5

P: n/a
KimmoA wrote:
Does C have a future? I'd like to think so, but nobody seems to agree
with me. Of course, I don't use C in my profession, and maybe I
wouldn't be using it if I had the pressure to actually produce things
with deadlines and stuff. Hmm. That's a depressing thought.
As long as the language fits requirements demanded by working coders, it
will be used well into the future. Maintenance of the millions of line
of code out there also guarantees (a la Cobol) that even if the language
drifts toward a tighter niche plenty of work into the future.

Choose the right tool for the job. I'd never use C to make a web site
go (even CGI) but I might use an OOP language like Ruby.
Jan 4 '07 #6

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