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String to Octal

I want to read in an Octal number argument and have it stored as an
octal number. For instance the user will type: ./a.out 777 and it
will store the octal number 777. But it atoi does this as an interger,
and sscanf gives me 0.

Feb 21 '06 #1
27 7287
In article <11********************@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.c om>,
<fu******@kettering.edu> wrote:
I want to read in an Octal number argument and have it stored as an
octal number. For instance the user will type: ./a.out 777 and it
will store the octal number 777. But it atoi does this as an interger,
and sscanf gives me 0.


strtoul() specifying a base of 8.
--
If you lie to the compiler, it will get its revenge. -- Henry Spencer
Feb 21 '06 #2
Thanks!

Feb 21 '06 #3
fu******@kettering.edu writes:
I want to read in an Octal number argument and have it stored as an
octal number. For instance the user will type: ./a.out 777 and it
will store the octal number 777. But it atoi does this as an interger,
and sscanf gives me 0.


Use strtol(), specifying base 8.
--
"I've been on the wagon now for more than a decade. Not a single goto
in all that time. I just don't need them any more. I don't even use
break or continue now, except on social occasions of course. And I
don't get carried away." --Richard Heathfield
Feb 21 '06 #4
fu******@kettering.edu wrote:
I want to read in an Octal number argument and have it stored as an
octal number. For instance the user will type: ./a.out 777 and it
will store the octal number 777. But it atoi does this as an interger,
and sscanf gives me 0.


#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void)
{
char *src[] = { "309", "511", "777", "1ff", "1411" }, *endp;
size_t i, n = sizeof src / sizeof *src;
unsigned long x;
printf(" Note: when * endp = '\\0', it is printed as '$'\n\n");
for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
printf(" The input string is \"%s\"\n", src[i]);
x = strtoul(src[i], &endp, 8);
printf("read as octal, *endp='%c',\n"
" value: %#lo (oct), %lu (dec), %#lx (hex)\n",
*endp ? *endp : '$', x, x, x);
x = strtoul(src[i], &endp, 10);
printf("read as decimal, *endp='%c',\n"
" value: %#lo (oct), %lu (dec), %#lx (hex)\n",
*endp ? *endp : '$', x, x, x);
x = strtoul(src[i], &endp, 16);
printf("read as hex, *endp='%c',\n"
" value: %#lo (oct), %lu (dec), %#lx (hex)\n\n",
*endp ? *endp : '$', x, x, x);
}
return 0;
}

Note: when * endp = '\0', it is printed as '$'

The input string is "309"
read as octal, *endp='9',
value: 030 (oct), 24 (dec), 0x18 (hex)
read as decimal, *endp='$',
value: 0465 (oct), 309 (dec), 0x135 (hex)
read as hex, *endp='$',
value: 01411 (oct), 777 (dec), 0x309 (hex)

The input string is "511"
read as octal, *endp='$',
value: 0511 (oct), 329 (dec), 0x149 (hex)
read as decimal, *endp='$',
value: 0777 (oct), 511 (dec), 0x1ff (hex)
read as hex, *endp='$',
value: 02421 (oct), 1297 (dec), 0x511 (hex)

The input string is "777"
read as octal, *endp='$',
value: 0777 (oct), 511 (dec), 0x1ff (hex)
read as decimal, *endp='$',
value: 01411 (oct), 777 (dec), 0x309 (hex)
read as hex, *endp='$',
value: 03567 (oct), 1911 (dec), 0x777 (hex)

The input string is "1ff"
read as octal, *endp='f',
value: 01 (oct), 1 (dec), 0x1 (hex)
read as decimal, *endp='f',
value: 01 (oct), 1 (dec), 0x1 (hex)
read as hex, *endp='$',
value: 0777 (oct), 511 (dec), 0x1ff (hex)

The input string is "1411"
read as octal, *endp='$',
value: 01411 (oct), 777 (dec), 0x309 (hex)
read as decimal, *endp='$',
value: 02603 (oct), 1411 (dec), 0x583 (hex)
read as hex, *endp='$',
value: 012021 (oct), 5137 (dec), 0x1411 (hex)

Feb 21 '06 #5
fu******@kettering.edu wrote:
I want to read in an Octal number argument and have it stored as an
octal number.


What do you mean by 'storing it as an octal number' ?

The representation of a number dose not matter for C. Typically it is
stored as binary number. If you have an underlying machine which
can store 8 symbols for each "bit" only then can you store it as octal
number.

I have seen lot of beginners having this confusion with octal and
hexadecimal representations. It is better to be cleared off this
confusion in the beginning it self.

Feb 21 '06 #6
fu******@kettering.edu wrote:
Thanks!


For what? See below.

Brian

--
Please quote enough of the previous message for context. To do so from
Google, click "show options" and use the Reply shown in the expanded
header.
Feb 21 '06 #7
On 2006-02-21, Default User <de***********@yahoo.com> wrote:
fu******@kettering.edu wrote:
Thanks!


For what? See below.

Brian


Is your threading in XanaNews broken? Try a threaded news reader : you
wont lose so much sleep over lack of context in single word
replies. It wasn't that interestnig anyway : he was just thanking
someone who actually helped him with a C problem.

--
Remove evomer to reply
Feb 21 '06 #8
fu******@kettering.edu a écrit :
I want to read in an Octal number argument
OK, it's a text representation. Say 123 or 0123 (C-way)
and have it stored as an
octal number.
Nonsense. The storage of numbers is binary.
For instance the user will type: ./a.out 777 and it
will store the octal number 777. But it atoi does this as an interger,
and sscanf gives me 0.


With which formatter ? Try "%o".

Better is strtol() with base 8 ("123") or 0 ("0123")

--
C is a sharp tool
Feb 21 '06 #9
"Richard G. Riley" <rg***********@gmail.com> writes:
On 2006-02-21, Default User <de***********@yahoo.com> wrote:
fu******@kettering.edu wrote:
Thanks!


For what? See below.

Brian


Is your threading in XanaNews broken? Try a threaded news reader : you
wont lose so much sleep over lack of context in single word
replies. It wasn't that interestnig anyway : he was just thanking
someone who actually helped him with a C problem.


I'm sure we all have threaded news readers. That's not the point. It
is rude to post responses without context for the following reasons:

1. Messages are not guaranteed to arrive remotely in a timely or
orderly manner. His response could well show up ahead of the
message to which he's responding for many people.

2. Many servers expire old messages. At some point, the original
message is likely to get expired on some server, and the response
may stick around a bit beyond it. People reading it will have no
idea what it's talking about.

3. Even if events transpire to make it possible, it's annoying to
have to look at one or more other messages just to get enough
context to understand the only one you were trying to read.

-Micah
Feb 21 '06 #10
On 2006-02-21, Micah Cowan <mi***@cowan.name> wrote:
"Richard G. Riley" <rg***********@gmail.com> writes:
On 2006-02-21, Default User <de***********@yahoo.com> wrote:
> fu******@kettering.edu wrote:
>
>> Thanks!
>
> For what? See below.
>
>
>
> Brian
>


Is your threading in XanaNews broken? Try a threaded news reader : you
wont lose so much sleep over lack of context in single word
replies. It wasn't that interestnig anyway : he was just thanking
someone who actually helped him with a C problem.


I'm sure we all have threaded news readers. That's not the point. It
is rude to post responses without context for the following reasons:

1. Messages are not guaranteed to arrive remotely in a timely or
orderly manner. His response could well show up ahead of the
message to which he's responding for many people.

2. Many servers expire old messages. At some point, the original
message is likely to get expired on some server, and the response
may stick around a bit beyond it. People reading it will have no
idea what it's talking about.

3. Even if events transpire to make it possible, it's annoying to
have to look at one or more other messages just to get enough
context to understand the only one you were trying to read.


Before throwing stones, though, it might be useful to examine whether
the extra context was _really_ needed. A "thank you" is mostly vacuous
anyway, and the person being addressed probably knows what they're being
thanked for. I've also seen people get called out for responding to the
question in the subject line alone without actually addressing the
specifics in the message body.
Feb 21 '06 #11
"suresh" <ma**********@gmail.com> writes:
fu******@kettering.edu wrote:
I want to read in an Octal number argument and have it stored as an
octal number.
What do you mean by 'storing it as an octal number' ?

The representation of a number dose not matter for C. Typically it is
stored as binary number.


Indeed, it is required to be stored as a binary number, or at least
that the implementation behave "as if" that were the case.
I have seen lot of beginners having this confusion with octal and
hexadecimal representations. It is better to be cleared off this
confusion in the beginning it self.


Absolutely. I recently had a similar problem where someone was trying
to strip leading zeroes from decimal numbers before printing them back
out. So their first-draft test had something like:

long var = 008;

Which of course caused compile-time errors. :-)

For the original poster: it does sound as if you're confusing storage
with representation. The only way to store something as an "octal
number" is to store it in a string representation of octal, which is
hardly efficient.

What you /really/ want to do is read it into a /binary/ format (some
sort of integer type), using scanf() or strtol() or similar (I and
probably many others here would /strongly/ recommend against any of
the *scanf() funcitons--few really know how to use it properly, and
those who do know how typically don't bother, since strtol() and its
cousins are so much more flexible). Once you've done that, you have
everything you need to know about the numnber.

When it comes time to print it out again, you simply use the
/appropriate/ conversion specification in printf() or whatever:
namely, "%o" (possibly modified according to your specific needs). Be
aware that the "o" specifier wants an unsigned int. And, if you want
it to be easily recognizable as an octal number, you probably want to
use the "#" flag (as in "%#o") as well.

In summary, it doesn't matter /what/ kind of number it is: if you read
it in correctly, it is that number, regardless of what kind of
representation you plan to use to print it out. The representation
used to print it back out merely depends on what conversion
specification you're using with *printf().

Hope that helps...

-Micah
Feb 21 '06 #12
Richard G. Riley wrote:

Is your threading in XanaNews broken?


I've had enough of your obstructist crap.
*plonk*
Brian

Feb 21 '06 #13
Micah Cowan wrote:

I'm sure we all have threaded news readers. That's not the point. It
is rude to post responses without context for the following reasons:


[snip 1 - 3]
4. One has the newsreader set to display only new messages. If the
preceeding messages were from a previous "session" then they aren't
immediately visible. It's a pointless annoyance to switch the view to
"view all messages" just to figure out what some Googler is trying to
say.

Brian
Feb 21 '06 #14
On 2006-02-21, Micah Cowan <mi***@cowan.name> wrote:
"Richard G. Riley" <rg***********@gmail.com> writes:
On 2006-02-21, Default User <de***********@yahoo.com> wrote:
> fu******@kettering.edu wrote:
>
>> Thanks!
>
> For what? See below.
>
>
>
> Brian
>


Is your threading in XanaNews broken? Try a threaded news reader : you
wont lose so much sleep over lack of context in single word
replies. It wasn't that interestnig anyway : he was just thanking
someone who actually helped him with a C problem.


I'm sure we all have threaded news readers. That's not the point. It
is rude to post responses without context for the following reasons:


It is just as rude and silly to post twice the same net nannying twice
in 2 minutes. Personally I'm here to read and comment on C : not a
high percentage of infantile posts telling people to include context
when they post "thanks".

Obviously context is better
Feb 22 '06 #15
On 2006-02-21, Default User <de***********@yahoo.com> wrote:
Richard G. Riley wrote:

Is your threading in XanaNews broken?


I've had enough of your obstructist crap.
*plonk*
Brian


It is always amusing to see those who are doing the "obstructing" and
the "telling off" get pissed off when they get some of it back.
--
Remove evomer to reply
Feb 22 '06 #16
On 21 Feb 2006 18:43:00 GMT, in comp.lang.c , "Richard G. Riley"
<rg***********@gmail.com> wrote:
Is your threading in XanaNews broken?
I doubt it. And nor is mine in Agent.
Try a threaded news reader :


Agent is threaded. However neither I nor my newsprovider keep every
single message ever posted, forever, not is it guaranteed that the
messages arrive in the order they were posted.

Thus a message posted this morning, or last week, or last month may
have already expired, not not have arrived yet, or be garbled or
whatever. All the threading in the world won't help you there. Each
post needs to stand on its own, containing enough context to be
meaningful.
As an aside, you started posting in CLC a couple of days ago, and seem
intent on picking fights with all the regulars. I'd really recommend
against that. It will simply cause you no end of pain and get you
killfiled if you're too annoying. You will then lose much of the
benefit you might have gained from posting here
Mark McIntyre
--
"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan

----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
Feb 22 '06 #17
On 22 Feb 2006 08:39:44 GMT, in comp.lang.c , "Richard G. Riley"
<rg***********@gmail.com> wrote:
It is always amusing to see those who are doing the "obstructing" and
the "telling off" get pissed off when they get some of it back.


You're well on the way to being killfiled by the regulars.
Mark McIntyre
--
"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan

----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
Feb 22 '06 #18
Mark McIntyre wrote:
"Richard G. Riley" <rg***********@gmail.com> wrote:
Is your threading in XanaNews broken?

.... snip ...
As an aside, you started posting in CLC a couple of days ago, and
seem intent on picking fights with all the regulars. I'd really
recommend against that. It will simply cause you no end of pain
and get you killfiled if you're too annoying. You will then lose
much of the benefit you might have gained from posting here


As a statistical datum, plonking him resulted in a 25% reduction of
download volume in my last synchronization of this newsgroup. Tis
a consummation devoutly to be wished.

--
"If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
"show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
"Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
More details at: <http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
Also see <http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/>

Feb 22 '06 #19
On 2006-02-22, CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.com> wrote:
Mark McIntyre wrote:
"Richard G. Riley" <rg***********@gmail.com> wrote:
Is your threading in XanaNews broken?

... snip ...

As an aside, you started posting in CLC a couple of days ago, and
seem intent on picking fights with all the regulars. I'd really
recommend against that. It will simply cause you no end of pain
and get you killfiled if you're too annoying. You will then lose
much of the benefit you might have gained from posting here


As a statistical datum, plonking him resulted in a 25% reduction of
download volume in my last synchronization of this newsgroup. Tis
a consummation devoutly to be wished.


Most of the regulars are 4 people I could name : including you. And over such
ridiculous issues as who "we" should help or offer advice to in this
NG. Fortunately there are also a plethora of posters less willing to
offer advice on posting style but more willing to help with c related
issues.

Of course I'm not so naive as to not see that I am banging my head
against a wall with such as you.

Other discussions have been fruitful even if one doesnt always see eye to eye.
--
Remove evomer to reply
Feb 22 '06 #20
On 22 Feb 2006 19:56:59 GMT, in comp.lang.c , "Richard G. Riley"
<rg***********@gmail.com> wrote:
Most of the regulars are 4 people I could name : including you.


Lemme see, Keith, CBF, Ben, Eric, Emmanuel, Micah, Brian, Walter, Al,
August, Christian, Chris, Chris T, Jack, Richard, Martin, Nick,
Vladimir recently. A little more than four. And there's some names
missing from that I'm sure.

Some of these people have been posting for *decades*. They've
forgotten more about C than you or I will ever know. And you feel its
appropriate to be rude to them.
Mark McIntyre
--
"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan

----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
Feb 22 '06 #21
Mark McIntyre wrote:
On 22 Feb 2006 19:56:59 GMT, in comp.lang.c , "Richard G. Riley"
<rg***********@gmail.com> wrote:
Most of the regulars are 4 people I could name : including you.
Lemme see, Keith, CBF, Ben, Eric, Emmanuel, Micah, Brian, Walter, Al,
August, Christian, Chris, Chris T, Jack, Richard, Martin, Nick,
Vladimir recently. A little more than four. And there's some names
missing from that I'm sure.


Yes, you missed me and even yourself. A nice round 20.
Some of these people have been posting for *decades*. They've
forgotten more about C than you or I will ever know. And you feel its
appropriate to be rude to them.


I quite agree.
--
Flash Gordon
Living in interesting times.
Web site - http://home.flash-gordon.me.uk/
comp.lang.c posting guidlines and intro -
http://clc-wiki.net/wiki/Intro_to_clc
Feb 23 '06 #22
Flash Gordon wrote:
Mark McIntyre wrote:
<rg***********@gmail.com> wrote:
Most of the regulars are 4 people I could name : including you.


Lemme see, Keith, CBF, Ben, Eric, Emmanuel, Micah, Brian, Walter,
Al, August, Christian, Chris, Chris T, Jack, Richard, Martin,
Nick, Vladimir recently. A little more than four. And there's
some names missing from that I'm sure.


Yes, you missed me and even yourself. A nice round 20.


Hey, Mark's a Scotsman, a non-omniscient being.

--
"If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
"show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
"Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
More details at: <http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
Also see <http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/>
Feb 23 '06 #23
On 2006-02-23, Flash Gordon <sp**@flash-gordon.me.uk> wrote:
Mark McIntyre wrote:
On 22 Feb 2006 19:56:59 GMT, in comp.lang.c , "Richard G. Riley"
<rg***********@gmail.com> wrote:
Most of the regulars are 4 people I could name : including you.


Lemme see, Keith, CBF, Ben, Eric, Emmanuel, Micah, Brian, Walter, Al,
August, Christian, Chris, Chris T, Jack, Richard, Martin, Nick,
Vladimir recently. A little more than four. And there's some names
missing from that I'm sure.


Yes, you missed me and even yourself. A nice round 20.
Some of these people have been posting for *decades*. They've
forgotten more about C than you or I will ever know. And you feel its
appropriate to be rude to them.


I quite agree.


I was openly rude to one person. Maybe two. The rest was an
arguement/discussion. It is common for cliques to form and support
each other against someone they see as "new" : this can be a good
thing. It can, also, be a thing harbouring on censorship of the worst
order and frightens many newbies away. I dont remember being "rude" to
anyone bar Abel or whoever it was for telling me to check the
copyright of anything I google up - "anal" was the word I used. This
would be the same guy who posted about 4 posts each of them
castigating someone for something with regard to their posting styles.

Lets see:

1) dont post links without checking the copyright. Whatever.
2) "I never use a debugger as it shows lack of
design". Whatever.
3) Dont reply to people who use abbreviations. Whatever.

As for the "forgotten more about" : yeah. That normally crops up in
backslapping cliques.

I dont wish to argue. I just dont wish to be dictated to on who I help
and who I request help from especially when that request meets with
success.

regards,
--
Remove evomer to reply
Feb 23 '06 #24
CBFalconer wrote:
Flash Gordon wrote:
Mark McIntyre wrote:
<rg***********@gmail.com> wrote:

Most of the regulars are 4 people I could name : including you.
Lemme see, Keith, CBF, Ben, Eric, Emmanuel, Micah, Brian, Walter,
Al, August, Christian, Chris, Chris T, Jack, Richard, Martin,
Nick, Vladimir recently. A little more than four. And there's
some names missing from that I'm sure.

Yes, you missed me and even yourself. A nice round 20.


Hey, Mark's a Scotsman, a non-omniscient being.


I know, but since this Mark is only a soft southerner I would not dare
to even think that he is less than perfect or he might come down from
Scotland beating up every English sassanack he passes on the way before
flattening me with a simple punch. ;-)
--
Mark (Flash) Gordon
Taking the piss of myself as much as anyone else.
Web site - http://home.flash-gordon.me.uk/
comp.lang.c posting guidlines and intro -
http://clc-wiki.net/wiki/Intro_to_clc
Feb 24 '06 #25
Richard G. Riley wrote:
On 2006-02-23, Flash Gordon <sp**@flash-gordon.me.uk> wrote:
Mark McIntyre wrote:
On 22 Feb 2006 19:56:59 GMT, in comp.lang.c , "Richard G. Riley"
<rg***********@gmail.com> wrote:

Most of the regulars are 4 people I could name : including you.
Lemme see, Keith, CBF, Ben, Eric, Emmanuel, Micah, Brian, Walter, Al,
August, Christian, Chris, Chris T, Jack, Richard, Martin, Nick,
Vladimir recently. A little more than four. And there's some names
missing from that I'm sure. Yes, you missed me and even yourself. A nice round 20.
Some of these people have been posting for *decades*. They've
forgotten more about C than you or I will ever know. And you feel its
appropriate to be rude to them.

I quite agree.


I was openly rude to one person. Maybe two. The rest was an
arguement/discussion. It is common for cliques to form and support
each other against someone they see as "new" : this can be a good
thing. It can, also, be a thing harbouring on censorship of the worst
order and frightens many newbies away. I dont remember being "rude" to
anyone bar Abel or whoever it was for telling me to check the
copyright of anything I google up - "anal" was the word I used.


That must have been in a different thread. In this one you have said
"ffs" to Vladimir which at least where I come from is being rude to
someone because of what it is an abbreviation for. I would hardly say
that calling someone a "self appointed mafioC" polite either. Nor is
saying, "Now you are advising on etiquette? You really are quite the
complete poster." in response to Vladimir's saying there was no need to
be rude exacly polite. Then saying to him, "I hope to hell you are not a
professional programmer with reasoning like this." could certainly be
considered insulting as well as rude, especially as Vladimir was
politely trying to present a reasoned counter argument to your claims.

Saying, "My whole issue with "the usual suspects" who are now in my
killfile or I'm in theirs ... It is still my contention they are full of
it." is, in my opinion, being rude to the bulk of the people who have
disagreed with you in this thread, including well respected members of
this group.

Similarly, referring to "...just some nosey arses..." is being rude to
at least a few people.

Then you have also said, "And the fact that you resort to a killfile
because I stand up to self important blowhards like yourself..." in
response to CBFalconer is definitely being rude specifically about him
and generally to a number of us.

So I would say you have been rude and insulting to me and a significant
number of other regulars here, not always directly but in sweeping
comments about a lot of us.

All these quote are from *this* thread and looked up in Google, so
anyone including you can easily check their veracity.
This
would be the same guy who posted about 4 posts each of them
castigating someone for something with regard to their posting styles.

Lets see:

1) dont post links without checking the copyright. Whatever.
2) "I never use a debugger as it shows lack of
design". Whatever.
3) Dont reply to people who use abbreviations. Whatever.
I don't recall anyone ever stating that last, given your demonstrated
ability to misremember can you provide a message ID for that?
As for the "forgotten more about" : yeah. That normally crops up in
backslapping cliques.
With a "clique" that includes members of the relevant standards bodies,
authors of well regarded books, authors of major implementations of the
standard C library and others of high pedigree I think that here there
is a certain justification for such comments.

It is also a "clique" that Vladimir seems to have managed to join in
fairly short order, since I think he has only been posting here for a
couple of months. So it is hardly an exclusive "clique". Admittedly he
is prepared to accept this group for what it is instead of insisting
that the majority of us already here are wrong about what this group is.
I dont wish to argue. I just dont wish to be dictated to on who I help
and who I request help from especially when that request meets with
success.


No one is stopping, or even attempting to stop, you from helping anyone
you want. All we want you to do is accept what is and is not topical
here, redirect non-topical discussions you take part in to else where,
use reasonable English (which apart from being rude to people you are),
and accept that the rest of us have a right to request people not to
hold off topic discussions and to follow normal Usenet conventions which
where established before this group was even created.
--
Flash Gordon
Living in interesting times.
Web site - http://home.flash-gordon.me.uk/
comp.lang.c posting guidlines and intro -
http://clc-wiki.net/wiki/Intro_to_clc
Feb 24 '06 #26
Flash Gordon wrote:

CBFalconer wrote:
Flash Gordon wrote:
Mark McIntyre wrote:
<rg***********@gmail.com> wrote:

> Most of the regulars are 4 people I could name : including you.
Lemme see, Keith, CBF, Ben, Eric, Emmanuel, Micah, Brian, Walter,
Al, August, Christian, Chris, Chris T, Jack, Richard, Martin,
Nick, Vladimir recently. A little more than four. And there's
some names missing from that I'm sure.
Yes, you missed me and even yourself. A nice round 20.


Hey, Mark's a Scotsman, a non-omniscient being.


I know, but since this Mark is only a soft southerner


You can't say that.
That's the No True Scotsman logical fallacy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_true_Scotsman

(not really) ;)

--
pete
Feb 24 '06 #27
pete wrote:
Flash Gordon wrote:
CBFalconer wrote:
Flash Gordon wrote:
Mark McIntyre wrote:
> <rg***********@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Most of the regulars are 4 people I could name : including you.
> Lemme see, Keith, CBF, Ben, Eric, Emmanuel, Micah, Brian, Walter,
> Al, August, Christian, Chris, Chris T, Jack, Richard, Martin,
> Nick, Vladimir recently. A little more than four. And there's
> some names missing from that I'm sure.
Yes, you missed me and even yourself. A nice round 20.
Hey, Mark's a Scotsman, a non-omniscient being. I know, but since this Mark is only a soft southerner


You can't say that.


By "this Mark" I meant me, just in case there is any confusion. I used
to post here and else where as Mark Gordon which is my real name :-)
That's the No True Scotsman logical fallacy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_true_Scotsman

(not really) ;)


Well, since I'll be up in Scotland later this year I'll remember not to
put sugar on my porridge :-)
--
Mark (Flash) Gordon
Living in interesting times.
Web site - http://home.flash-gordon.me.uk/
comp.lang.c posting guidlines and intro -
http://clc-wiki.net/wiki/Intro_to_clc
Feb 24 '06 #28

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