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how to creat a web browser

now i have problem i.e how 2 creat a web browser ?

can any1 help me on this
which languge i need 2 know what other things i need 2 know to make a
web browser ?

plz. help

Nov 14 '05 #1
18 2044
On 17 May 2005 19:03:14 -0700, bl***************@yahoo.com wrote in
comp.lang.c:
now i have problem i.e how 2 creat a web browser ?
You can't make a web browser with standard C, since the language does
not have any built-in networking support. So the question is
off-topic here.
can any1 help me on this
which languge i need 2 know what other things i need 2 know to make a
web browser ?

plz. help


Programming languages require very precise input. If you can't use
proper spelling, capitalization, and punctuation in English, how can
you possibly hope to write programs?

--
Jack Klein
Home: http://JK-Technology.Com
FAQs for
comp.lang.c http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
comp.lang.c++ http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/
alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++
http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~a...FAQ-acllc.html
Nov 14 '05 #2

"Programming languages require very precise input. If you can't use
proper spelling, capitalization, and punctuation in English, how can
you possibly hope to write programs?" ?????

That was --while true-- a harsh gesture. As it is off-topic too! Last
time I checked standard C it didn't include "written language critique"

Nov 14 '05 #3
On 17 May 2005 19:03:14 -0700, bl***************@yahoo.com wrote:
now i have problem i.e how 2 creat a web browser ?

can any1 help me on this
which languge i need 2 know what other things i need 2 know to make a
web browser ?

plz. help


The first language you need is English. Then you can find an
appropriate newsgroup to post in. This is not it.

--
Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
re************************@att.net
Nov 14 '05 #4
In article <11*********************@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups. com>,
<bl***************@yahoo.com> wrote:
now i have problem i.e how 2 creat a web browser ?

can any1 help me on this
which languge i need 2 know what other things i need 2 know to make a
web browser ?


You can download the source code for firefox and see how they did it:

http://www.mozilla.org/download-mozilla.html

You may find the complexity intimidating, but if you want to write
anything more than a toylike browser, you'll need to come to grips with
the reality of the situation. In fact, it might be just as rewarding to
contribute to their project rather than trying to go it alone.

Good luck, and just because you don't write perfectly standard English
at all times doesn't mean you can't handle programming. I've met
and worked with a few borderline dyslexic programmers who were top-notch.
I was glad to fix their occasional spelling mistakes or poor word choice
for them so that they could concentrate on developing cool software.
Nov 14 '05 #5
Alan Balmer wrote:
On 17 May 2005 19:03:14 -0700, bl***************@yahoo.com wrote:

now i have problem i.e how 2 creat a web browser ?

can any1 help me on this
which languge i need 2 know what other things i need 2 know to make a
web browser ?

plz. help

The first language you need is English. Then you can find an
appropriate newsgroup to post in. This is not it.


To translate... What these people are saying is that generally, one
needs to learn to crawl before they learn to walk.

Writting a web browser is generally considered to be one of the hardest
things to write, and I know of no project that was started from scratch
in this decade.
The newest project I know of that attempts just this is Dillo (And it
happens to be extremely fast and written in C), however even they appear
to use an existing, although very old and small renderer as a basis
(From what I can see).
Dillo has alot of problems, however, as the simple fact of the matter
is that very few websites are correctly written, and the primary job of
a modern web browser is to be able to render acceptably websites that
may not be "correct". Slashdot is one particularly nasty website for
Dillo, for instance.
Nov 14 '05 #6
> Programming languages require very precise input. If you can't use
proper spelling, capitalization, and punctuation in English, how can
you possibly hope to write programs?


Apropos, I recently had a co-worker; a programmer, who was a dyslectic.
Because of that, he had to double-check and sometimes triple-check his
writings. When verifying the code, he more than occasionally discovered bugs
and optimization-opportunities. His code never contained error related to
variable-names.

--

Regards,
Ronny Mandal
Nov 14 '05 #7
<bl***************@yahoo.com> wrote

now i have problem i.e how 2 creat a web browser ?

can any1 help me on this
which languge i need 2 know what other things i need 2 know to make a
web browser ?

Do you want to create a web browser from scratch, or do you want to call
someone else's code so that you can incorporate a browser into your own
application?

Browsers are inherently graphical. Do you want to write the graphics
routines from scratch, or do you want to call someone else's library?

(You cannot do graphical output in ANSI C, and need a third party library
for window maagement and the like, but this will be the least of your
problems.)
Nov 14 '05 #8
Arafangion wrote:
Alan Balmer wrote:
bl***************@yahoo.com wrote:
now i have problem i.e how 2 creat a web browser ?

can any1 help me on this
which languge i need 2 know what other things i need 2 know to
make a web browser ?


The first language you need is English. Then you can find an
appropriate newsgroup to post in. This is not it.


To translate... What these people are saying is that generally,
one needs to learn to crawl before they learn to walk.

Writting a web browser is generally considered to be one of the
hardest things to write, and I know of no project that was
started from scratch in this decade.

... snip ...

Besides which a request using silly abbreviations, lower case i, 2
in place of two, etc. is fundamentally offensive to the reader and
demonstrates ignorance, rather than a language barrier. The
conclusion may be wrong, but the subject is off-topic here anyhow.

--
"If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
"show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
"Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
Nov 14 '05 #9
On Thu, 19 May 2005 04:40:47 +1000, Arafangion
<Ar********@invalid.email.address.com> wrote:
Alan Balmer wrote:
On 17 May 2005 19:03:14 -0700, bl***************@yahoo.com wrote:

now i have problem i.e how 2 creat a web browser ?

can any1 help me on this
which languge i need 2 know what other things i need 2 know to make a
web browser ?

plz. help

The first language you need is English. Then you can find an
appropriate newsgroup to post in. This is not it.


To translate... What these people are saying is that generally, one
needs to learn to crawl before they learn to walk.

I'm not surprised that you think the OP needs a translator, but what I
was saying was:

1. Leet speak may be appropriate when discoursing with other children
about favorite rock stars (translation:
l3E7 $p33|< ma% |3E aPPr0PR|A+E \/\/HEN disKu55][Ng |=4V0|2|tE
r0xxx0R 574|2$ W][tH 07]-[Er (H][1|)r3]\[

but it's not appropriate when discussing technical matters with
professionals, and sloppy language in general is a bad sign in a
would-be programmer.

2. How to create a web browser is not topical in this newsgroup.

--
Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
re************************@att.net
Nov 14 '05 #10
Malcolm wrote:

<snip>
Browsers are inherently graphical.
<OT>
Strange that I have several time succeeded in using a text only web
browser. I've even used text only web browsers on http://www.microsoft.com/
</OT>
Do you want to write the graphics
routines from scratch, or do you want to call someone else's library?

(You cannot do graphical output in ANSI C, and need a third party library
for window maagement and the like, but this will be the least of your
problems.)


Yes, that is true.
--
Flash Gordon
Living in interesting times.
Although my email address says spam, it is real and I read it.
Nov 14 '05 #11
Ronny Mandal wrote:
Programming languages require very precise input. If you can't use
proper spelling, capitalization, and punctuation in English, how can
you possibly hope to write programs?

Apropos, I recently had a co-worker; a programmer, who was a dyslectic.
Because of that, he had to double-check and sometimes triple-check his
writings. When verifying the code, he more than occasionally discovered bugs
and optimization-opportunities. His code never contained error related to
variable-names.


I'm also dyslexic, but I get computers to do most of my checking. One of
my old sigs is...

Mark Gordon
Dyslexic Programmer.
At least the compiler ensures I spell variable names consistently wrong.
--
Flash Gordon
Living in interesting times.
Although my email address says spam, it is real and I read it.
Nov 14 '05 #12
"Malcolm" <re*******@btinternet.com> wrote:

# Browsers are inherently graphical.

You mean like lynx?

--
SM Ryan http://www.rawbw.com/~wyrmwif/
JUSTICE!
Justice is dead.
Nov 14 '05 #13
On Wed, 18 May 2005 23:12:27 +0200, Ronny Mandal
<ro*****@math.uio.no> wrote:
Programming languages require very precise input. If you can't use
proper spelling, capitalization, and punctuation in English, how can
you possibly hope to write programs?


Apropos, I recently had a co-worker; a programmer, who was a dyslectic.
Because of that, he had to double-check and sometimes triple-check his
writings. When verifying the code, he more than occasionally discovered bugs
and optimization-opportunities. His code never contained error related to
variable-names.


That's similar to my superstition that if code compiles first time it's
bound to have nasty bugs. It's based on the same thing -- if you are
forced to look at the code many times -- whether by dyslexia, typing
errors which need to be corrected, formal code reviews or whatever --
then it's more likely that you'll find more subtle bugs when reviewing
it.

In the days when we wrote everything on coding sheets, which were given
to girls to type onto punched cards, and the results came back several
days later, we were /really/ careful to get it right the first time.
When the programmer has an editor and just presses one button to compile
it's really tempting to let the compiler find the mistakes (and of
course it misses the important ones)...

Chris C
Nov 14 '05 #14
Chris Croughton wrote:
.... snip ... When the programmer has an editor and just presses one button to
compile it's really tempting to let the compiler find the mistakes
(and of course it misses the important ones)...


No, I think it is important to acknowledge the temptation and
usage, and develop the habit of writing code in such a manner that
the compiler can find the problems. This means, to me, such things
as "if (CONST == expression)", short single purpose functions,
observing the rule of 7, careful formatting, and who knows what
else. It also means lint early and often.

I tend to compile after about two lines of revised code. Maybe
less.

--
"If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
"show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
"Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
Nov 14 '05 #15
In article <d6**********@nwrdmz02.dmz.ncs.ea.ibs-infra.bt.com>,
Malcolm <re*******@btinternet.com> wrote:

(You cannot do graphical output in ANSI C, and need a third party library
for window maagement and the like, but this will be the least of your
problems.)


Here are the graphical results of my informal poll on the subject:

55% ###########################
31% ###############
21% #############
12% #####
07% ###
Nov 14 '05 #16
On Thu, 19 May 2005 17:51:02 GMT, CBFalconer
<cb********@yahoo.com> wrote:
Chris Croughton wrote:
... snip ...
When the programmer has an editor and just presses one button to
compile it's really tempting to let the compiler find the mistakes
(and of course it misses the important ones)...


No, I think it is important to acknowledge the temptation and
usage, and develop the habit of writing code in such a manner that
the compiler can find the problems. This means, to me, such things
as "if (CONST == expression)", short single purpose functions,
observing the rule of 7, careful formatting, and who knows what
else. It also means lint early and often.


No, that won't do it. I'm talking about bugs in the algorithm (or in
the translation of it into C), where the compiler can't catch them
because what you write is syntactically valid, it just doesn't make
sense for what you are trying to do.

char *my_strcpy(char *dest, const char *source)
{
while (*source)
*dest++ = *source;
return dest;
}

Compile and lint might find typos, but only looking at it (or running it
and finding that it fails, probably catastrophically) can find the
actual error. If there were a typo in it which caused it to fail
compilation then /at least/ it would mean that the programmer looked at
it again and is thus more likely to spot the bug.
I tend to compile after about two lines of revised code. Maybe
less.


Well, that's pretty useless when writing the code initially, the code is
very unlikely to compile at all. Or if the code being revised is in s
common header file so that it causes the whole project to be recompiled
each time. Although that would be a nice job if that were company
policy -- change two lines, recompile which takes half an hour, come
back and chance another two lines, have another half hour break while it
recompiles everything again...

Chris C
Nov 14 '05 #17
Chris Croughton wrote:
<cb********@yahoo.com> wrote:
.... snip ...
I tend to compile after about two lines of revised code. Maybe
less.


Well, that's pretty useless when writing the code initially, the
code is very unlikely to compile at all. Or if the code being
revised is in s common header file so that it causes the whole
project to be recompiled each time. Although that would be a
nice job if that were company policy -- change two lines,
recompile which takes half an hour, come back and chance another
two lines, have another half hour break while it recompiles
everything again...


Yah, sure. I didn't say run. I didn't say link. Intervals for
those may be a smidgeon longer. Besides, I don't believe in half
hour compiles. Even on a 486, a half-minute is unusual.

--
"If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
"show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
"Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson

Nov 14 '05 #18
On Fri, 20 May 2005 01:35:45 GMT, CBFalconer
<cb********@yahoo.com> wrote:
Chris Croughton wrote:
<cb********@yahoo.com> wrote:

... snip ...
I tend to compile after about two lines of revised code. Maybe
less.


Well, that's pretty useless when writing the code initially, the
code is very unlikely to compile at all. Or if the code being
revised is in s common header file so that it causes the whole
project to be recompiled each time. Although that would be a
nice job if that were company policy -- change two lines,
recompile which takes half an hour, come back and chance another
two lines, have another half hour break while it recompiles
everything again...


Yah, sure. I didn't say run. I didn't say link. Intervals for
those may be a smidgeon longer. Besides, I don't believe in half
hour compiles. Even on a 486, a half-minute is unusual.


As I said, if it's a header file being changed you need to recompile
everything which depends on it to make sure that nothing is broken by
your change (compiling a header file on its own is unlikely to do
anything useful).

I don't believe that compiling after "two lines of revised code" will
work much anyway, unless the 'revisions' are so trivial that they are
easier checked by hand. Most 'revisions' will need a lot more lines to
be changed to even make it compile, because the 'revised' code will be
incompatible with the rest.

Even half a minute every minute reduces the productivity by a third...

Chris C
Nov 14 '05 #19

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