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Licensing Question

P: n/a
I've been tasked to create a database for the company I'm interning
with. However, they realized the office suite they have does not
include access. I'm not sure what type of licensing they would need for
this. It's a small company, about 30 or so computers and 20 some
employees, and they don't want to spend too much just to get the
licenses. Is there some solution that would only require one license or
have cheap per user or per machine costs?

I'm fairly inexperienced with databases, and they want it to be
expandable in the future, so the solution must allow changes to the db
without much extra effort.

I was also looking into Base, the Database application in
OpenOffice.org, and it seemed very similar to Access, although I didn't
spend much time with it yet and it is only part of the beta OOo Version
2. Anyone have information as to how well it works, or if it would be
easy to use instead of MS Access? What about buying one license of MS
Access to develop the .MDB and using Base to access the .MDB on client
machines?

Nov 13 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
gr***********@gmail.com wrote:
I've been tasked to create a database for the company I'm interning
with. However, they realized the office suite they have does not
include access. I'm not sure what type of licensing they would need for
this. It's a small company, about 30 or so computers and 20 some
employees, and they don't want to spend too much just to get the
licenses. Is there some solution that would only require one license or
have cheap per user or per machine costs?

I'm fairly inexperienced with databases, and they want it to be
expandable in the future, so the solution must allow changes to the db
without much extra effort.

I was also looking into Base, the Database application in
OpenOffice.org, and it seemed very similar to Access, although I didn't
spend much time with it yet and it is only part of the beta OOo Version
2. Anyone have information as to how well it works, or if it would be
easy to use instead of MS Access? What about buying one license of MS
Access to develop the .MDB and using Base to access the .MDB on client
machines?

If you have the developer edition of MS Access, you can redistribute the
Access Runtime version with your database for free (i think). When you
distribute your app, you have to make a copy of it (IMPORTANT), and
convert it to MDE. The conversion is irreversible, and end users can't
edit VBA-code any more after converting.
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
For Access 2003, you can purchase the separate Visual Studio Tools for
Office System 2003, which includes runtime support and a Packaging and
Distribution Wizard. Many people find it a great deal simpler to also obtain
a third-party installer such as InstallShield or Wise InstallMaster and the
Sagekey scripts.

A successful runtime application has to be a well-developed and
fully-developed application. It is not a job for someone "fairly
inexperienced with databases" unless your employer is willing to invest a
great deal in your education. And, if you are interning just for the summer,
that may not be quite enough time to both become an accomplished developer
and develop the application they want. On the other hand, if you are a "fast
study", go for it.

There's very good information on the subject at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/access/deve...onversions.htm, MVP Tony
Toews' site.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

<gr***********@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@z14g2000cwz.googlegr oups.com...
I've been tasked to create a database for the company I'm interning
with. However, they realized the office suite they have does not
include access. I'm not sure what type of licensing they would need for
this. It's a small company, about 30 or so computers and 20 some
employees, and they don't want to spend too much just to get the
licenses. Is there some solution that would only require one license or
have cheap per user or per machine costs?

I'm fairly inexperienced with databases, and they want it to be
expandable in the future, so the solution must allow changes to the db
without much extra effort.

I was also looking into Base, the Database application in
OpenOffice.org, and it seemed very similar to Access, although I didn't
spend much time with it yet and it is only part of the beta OOo Version
2. Anyone have information as to how well it works, or if it would be
easy to use instead of MS Access? What about buying one license of MS
Access to develop the .MDB and using Base to access the .MDB on client
machines?

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
supposing they purchased a license for Visual Studio Tools for
Office System 2003, and i created the database with that. when its
done, and i compile it for runtime, how will that work with multiple
users inputing data/runnign reports etc? do they need to run a backend
access server? how much more work would that make?

is there an equivalent in the open source world you know of that will
have similar capabilites?

Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
fp
For a multi-user system you would split the back end from the front. That is
pretty easy. The back end just needs to be visible to the clients.

Before you choose your tools you should probably gather your requirements.
You can then choose the appropriate method and tools to solve you problem.

Good Luck

--
******************************
Fred Parker
Lynn Consulting Group, L.L.C.
http://www.lynnconsultinggroup.com
******************************
Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
"Greg Chap" wrote
supposing they purchased a license
for Visual Studio Tools for Office
System 2003, and i created the data-
base with that. when its done, and i
compile it for runtime, how will that
work with multiple users inputing
data/runnign reports etc?
how much more work would
that make?
Yes, you can use the runtime support for a multiuser environment. Creating a
multiuser application is only a little more complex than creating a single
user application for the runtime.
do they need to run a backend
access server?
There is no such thing as a "backend Access server", because Access does all
its data retrieval and manipulation on the user's machine; however, using
the standard Jet database engine, you put a "back end" containing tables,
data, and relationships on a shared folder in your network, and link the
"front-end" containing queries, forms, reports, macros (if any), modules,
and local lookup tables on each user's machine..

Access can also be used to create client applications to server databases,
such as MS SQL Server, Sybase products, Informix, and Oracle. Doing so can
range from a little more work to a great deal more work than a standalone or
multiuser database application.
is there an equivalent in the open
source world you know of that will
have similar capabilites?


No, Access, IMNSHO, has no counterpart in either the commercial or open
source worlds -- the combination of ease of use, ease of learning, extent of
development ability, and interoperability is unique.

Yes, there are databases, both commercial and open-source, and some even
include the UI as does Access... two, both commercial, are Alpha Five and
Filemaker Pro. Both of those have their adherents, and I am sure they will
say much the same as I did about Access. I understand there is now a
database component to Open Office, but it is so new that I don't know any
details -- in fact, it may still be considered 'beta'.

There are open-source languages, such as various versions of C, PHP, and
Perl, which can access open-source server databases such as MySQL
(open-source but not GPL) or PostgreSQL. You'd have to find another source
for details on those, but I can't imagine them being as quick and easy for
the purpose you describe as would Access.

There's an introductory presentation on Access in a Multiuser Environment
that I did for my user group that you can download from
http://appdevissues.tripod.com. It will identify topics that I thought
worthwhile to discuss, and a bit more. The best collection of detailed
information and links on the subject of Access in the multiuser environment
is at MVP Tony Toews' site, http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
Thanks for all the information Larry!

Nov 13 '05 #7

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