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Visual Basic for Applications

P: n/a
AK
I don't want any part of the previous discussion on Visual Basic
versus Visual Basic.Net.

My query is about using Visual Basic for Applications; and whether it
is better to use Visual Basic 6 or Visual Basic.Net as a springboard
for studying VBA.

I use Office 2000 and would like to use VBA as a tool to customize it.
I have zero programming experience.
I would like to read through and work on the examples of a beginners
books (Dummies/Idiots/Absolute begginers or whatever) on either Visual
Basic 6 or Visual Basic.Net before I delve into VBA itself.

Has MicroSoft indicated whether or not they are changing the
background of future versions of Office VBA from VB6 to VB.Net?
Jul 17 '05 #1
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"AK" <cw**@aol.com> wrote in message
news:db**************************@posting.google.c om...
My query is about using Visual Basic for Applications; and whether it
is better to use Visual Basic 6 or Visual Basic.Net as a springboard
for studying VBA.
VB6 is definitely the better springboard, but see the comment in the next
paragraph. The.NET 'thing' is called VB, but is really quite a different
language in many respects to 'classic' VB and certainly NOT relevant to VBA.

Why do you need to use VB as a springboard? - VBA works within a development
environment very similar to the VB one, except you can't create ActiveX
components or 'independent' executables.
Has MicroSoft indicated whether or not they are changing the
background of future versions of Office VBA from VB6 to VB.Net?


Not sure about this one, but I don't believe that Office 2003 has .full (if
any) NET functionality (not that I've heard of, anyway).

BTW, for questions relating to Office Object Model issues, you're probably
better off using msnews.microsoft.com newsgroups relevant to the MS products
you are using as the VBA host (eg, Word, Excel, etc.).

Good luck, and ask here if you have any further questions.

HTH

Rob.
Jul 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
If you don't have experience programming, don't bother with VB at all. It
will confuse you. Although many things are similar in VB there are a lot of
differences between VB and VBA. I program in both. In a LOT of cases
(especially in Excel) you can use the macro learn function as a springboard
to work with.

Here's a book that might help
http://www.target.com/gp/detail.html...sin=B0000BYQ4Z

Ken Getz is an instructor with AppDev and a MVP.

another option if you are going to do a LOT in VBA is the AppDev course
http://www.appdev.com/prodfamily.asp...ame=VBAProduct

I got it after programming for some time and learned some nifty stuff.

Of course the least expensive way is to start, use the help screens and post
to the newsgroups for help. I've always have great luck.

Sue

"AK" <cw**@aol.com> wrote in message
news:db**************************@posting.google.c om...
I don't want any part of the previous discussion on Visual Basic
versus Visual Basic.Net.

My query is about using Visual Basic for Applications; and whether it
is better to use Visual Basic 6 or Visual Basic.Net as a springboard
for studying VBA.

I use Office 2000 and would like to use VBA as a tool to customize it.
I have zero programming experience.
I would like to read through and work on the examples of a beginners
books (Dummies/Idiots/Absolute begginers or whatever) on either Visual
Basic 6 or Visual Basic.Net before I delve into VBA itself.

Has MicroSoft indicated whether or not they are changing the
background of future versions of Office VBA from VB6 to VB.Net?

Jul 17 '05 #3

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