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Psyco performance

P: n/a
I'm not seeing much benefit from psyco (only 5-10% faster). Maybe this
example is too trivial? Can someone give me some pointers as to what
kind of code would see a dramatic benefit?

Here's the code:

import time
import psyco

n = 100000

t1 = time.clock()
l = list(range(0,n))
l2 = [x**2 for x in l]
t2 = time.clock()
no_psyco = t2 - t1

psyco.log()
psyco.full()

t1 = time.clock()
l = list(range(0,n))
l2 = [x**2 for x in l]
t2 = time.clock()

with_psyco = t2 - t1

print 'without psyco = ',no_psyco
print 'with psyco = ',with_psyco
print 'delta = ',(((no_psyco - with_psyco)/no_psyco) * 100),'%'

Jun 20 '06 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
da********@yahoo.com wrote:
I'm not seeing much benefit from psyco (only 5-10% faster). Maybe this
example is too trivial? Can someone give me some pointers as to what
kind of code would see a dramatic benefit?

Here's the code:

import time
import psyco

n = 100000

t1 = time.clock()
l = list(range(0,n))
l2 = [x**2 for x in l]
t2 = time.clock()
no_psyco = t2 - t1

psyco.log()
psyco.full()

t1 = time.clock()
l = list(range(0,n))
l2 = [x**2 for x in l]
t2 = time.clock()

with_psyco = t2 - t1

print 'without psyco = ',no_psyco
print 'with psyco = ',with_psyco
print 'delta = ',(((no_psyco - with_psyco)/no_psyco) * 100),'%'


Place all the code in a function. Even without psyco you might get
somewhat better performances then. And I doubt psyco can optimise code
that isn't in a function anyway.

And lastly, most of the code is probably spend computing x**2 which is
already optimised C code.
Jun 20 '06 #2

P: n/a
What's the reasoning behind requiring everything to be in functions?
Just curious.

On 6/20/06, Christophe <ch*************@free.fr> wrote:

Place all the code in a function. Even without psyco you might get
somewhat better performances then. And I doubt psyco can optimise code
that isn't in a function anyway.

Jun 20 '06 #3

P: n/a
Hello,

Gregory Piñero a écrit :
What's the reasoning behind requiring everything to be in functions?
Just curious.


You may want to read this:

http://psyco.sourceforge.net/introdu...-jit-compilers

Psyco has to run the code at least once to emit code specialized for the
actual data. It works by replacing blocks of code by other blocks,
optimized for the kind of data seen the previous times.

On the contrary, the code outside functions is run only once. You'll
never get the chance to run the optimized version again...

--
Amaury
Jun 20 '06 #4

P: n/a
> Place all the code in a function. Even without psyco you might get
somewhat better performances then. And I doubt psyco can optimise code
that isn't in a function anyway.

And lastly, most of the code is probably spend computing x**2 which is
already optimised C code.


I've changed the code to include a class, method call, and function.
Now the Psyco code is quite a bit slower. Is this a valid way to test
Psyco's effects? When I run the following code I get this result:

without psyco = 0.96840101186
with psyco = 1.82430169197
with psyco = 0.855900680114 slower
The code:

import time
import psyco

class Test(object):
def __init__(self, value):
self.value = value

def foo(self):
return reduce(lambda x,y : x + y, list(range(0,self.value)))

def test(n):
l = [Test(i) for i in range(1, n)]
return [x.foo() for x in l]

n = 1000

t1 = time.clock()
l2 = test(n)
t2 = time.clock()
no_psyco = t2 - t1

psyco.full()

t1 = time.clock()
l2 = test(n)
t2 = time.clock()

with_psyco = t2 - t1

print 'without psyco = ',no_psyco
print 'with psyco = ',with_psyco
delta = (no_psyco - with_psyco)
if(delta > 0):
result = 'faster'
else:
result = 'slower'

print 'with psyco = ',abs(delta),result

Jun 20 '06 #5

P: n/a
<da********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@r2g2000cwb.googlegro ups.com...
Place all the code in a function. Even without psyco you might get
somewhat better performances then. And I doubt psyco can optimise code
that isn't in a function anyway.

And lastly, most of the code is probably spend computing x**2 which is
already optimised C code.


I've changed the code to include a class, method call, and function.
Now the Psyco code is quite a bit slower. Is this a valid way to test
Psyco's effects? When I run the following code I get this result:

without psyco = 0.96840101186
with psyco = 1.82430169197
with psyco = 0.855900680114 slower

Here are 3 different implementations of foo, with varying degrees of
improvement.

func without with
foo1: 0.1727 0.0106
foo2: 0.1020 0.1012
foo3: 0.3632 0.8068

foo1 is just a brute force for-loop summing the values of the composed list,
foo2 calls sum(), and foo3 is the original foo using reduce().
Surprisingly, brute force + psyco beats reduce and sum without psyco.

psyco's strength is in compiling Python code inside functions. In foo2 and
foo3, most of the processing is done not in explicit Python, but in C code
implementation of sum and reduce, so the psyco processing is actually adding
more than it is optimizing.

-- Paul
import time
import psyco
time.clock()

class Test(object):
def __init__(self, value):
self.value = value

def foo1(self):
z = 0
for i in range(self.value):
z += i
return z

def foo2(self):
return sum(list(range(0,self.value)))

def foo3(self):
return reduce(lambda x,y : x + y, list(range(0,self.value)))

def test(n,f):
l = [Test(i) for i in range(1, n)]
return [f(x) for x in l]

n = 1000
fns = (Test.foo1, Test.foo2, Test.foo3)
no_psyco = []
with_psyco = []

for fn in fns:
t1 = time.clock()
l2 = test(n,fn)
t2 = time.clock()
no_psyco.append( t2 - t1 )

psyco.full()

for fn in fns:
t1 = time.clock()
l2 = test(n,fn)
t2 = time.clock()
with_psyco.append( t2 - t1 )

for fnData in zip([f.func_name for f in fns],no_psyco,with_psyco):
print "%s: %.4f %.4f" % fnData
Jun 21 '06 #6

P: n/a
> > > Place all the code in a function. Even without psyco you might get
somewhat better performances then. And I doubt psyco can optimise code
that isn't in a function anyway.


Another thing I wasn't considering is that the first call with psyco
enabled might be slower. The 2nd time the psyco-compiled function is
called is where the speed improvement may be present. With the code at
the bottom, I get these results:

without psyco = 0.000421282593179
first call with psyco = 0.000902349320933
with psyco = 5.30793718196e-005
first call with psyco = 114.190981432 % slower
2nd call with psyco = 87.400530504 % faster
import time
import psyco

def test(l):
result = 0

for item in l:
result += item

return result

l = list(range(0, 1000))

t1 = time.clock()
l2 = test(l)
t2 = time.clock()
no_psyco = t2 - t1

psyco.log()
psyco.bind(test)

t1 = time.clock()
l2 = test(l)
t2 = time.clock()

first_call_with_psyco = t2 - t1

t1 = time.clock()
l2 = test(l)
t2 = time.clock()

with_psyco = t2 - t1

print 'without psyco = ',no_psyco
print 'first call with psyco = ',first_call_with_psyco
print 'with psyco = ',with_psyco
first_delta = ((no_psyco - first_call_with_psyco)/no_psyco) * 100
delta = ((no_psyco - with_psyco)/no_psyco) * 100

if(first_delta > 0):
result = 'faster'
else:
result = 'slower'

print 'first call with psyco = ',abs(first_delta),'% ',result

if(delta > 0):
result = 'faster'
else:
result = 'slower'

print '2nd call with psyco = ',abs(delta),'% ',result

Jun 21 '06 #7

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