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Fancy GUI with Python

P: n/a
Hi all. I just downloaded and installed the new Office suite from MS
with their new 'ribbon' based UI. I think it's pretty cool and AFT*
for a new UI paradigm. I hope it sticks.

Anyway, I'm wondering how to implement a gui like this with Python. I
don't think wx or qt or gtk or tkinter support this sort of fading and
glowing type of effects... or do they? I played with wx way back in
2000 or so (C++ version), and it certainly didn't have any of that. I
don't know if this stuff is now built into XP, or if it's specialized
libraries only accessible to MS for their purposes. Can a python gui
framework be redirected to use the new gui? Or is this something that
has to be manually emulated from a low-level if python is to make use
of it? What about under linux?

So I'm not sure if this is a Python question, a xxx-Python question
(where xxx is the widget toolkit of choice), or a windows API type of
question.

How does one make fancy fading guis with python? (cross-platform if
possible)

thanks
ms

*AFT = about freakin' time

May 28 '06 #1
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P: n/a
Ten
On Sunday 28 May 2006 19:25, 63*******@sneakemail.com wrote:
Hi all. I just downloaded and installed the new Office suite from MS
with their new 'ribbon' based UI. I think it's pretty cool and AFT*
for a new UI paradigm. I hope it sticks.

Anyway, I'm wondering how to implement a gui like this with Python. I
don't think wx or qt or gtk or tkinter support this sort of fading and
glowing type of effects... or do they? I played with wx way back in
2000 or so (C++ version), and it certainly didn't have any of that. I
don't know if this stuff is now built into XP, or if it's specialized
libraries only accessible to MS for their purposes. Can a python gui
framework be redirected to use the new gui? Or is this something that
has to be manually emulated from a low-level if python is to make use
of it? What about under linux?

So I'm not sure if this is a Python question, a xxx-Python question
(where xxx is the widget toolkit of choice), or a windows API type of
question.

How does one make fancy fading guis with python? (cross-platform if
possible)

thanks
ms

*AFT = about freakin' time


Unless I'm missing something (I haven't examined it exhaustively), everything
therein seems quite easily doable using python and Qt. I'd check it out.
Ten

--
There are 10 types of people in this world,
those who understand binary, and those who don't.
May 28 '06 #2

P: n/a
> Hi all. I just downloaded and installed the new Office suite from MS
with their new 'ribbon' based UI. I think it's pretty cool and AFT*
for a new UI paradigm. I hope it sticks. Anyway, I'm wondering how to implement a gui like this with Python.
I haven't seen their new Office suit (apart form a few screenshots).
Judging from the past, the code is probably statically linked to MS
Office. Many of the previous iterations of MS Office did introduce
their own look and feels, effects and widgets. Third party Windows
developers soon followed suit reimplementing the widgets. Delphi
community for example focuses a lot on UI and UI effects (Python
community does not). VCL libraries can be compiled to ActiveX
components and you should then be able to use them from Python, at
least on Windows. Or maybe someone will make a .NET assembly and you
will be able to drive it from IronPython or Python for .NET. If you are
lucky, it may even be cross-platform via Mono.
So I'm not sure if this is a Python question, a xxx-Python question
(where xxx is the widget toolkit of choice), or a windows API type of
question.


This is NOT a Python specific issue. It is a widget library and FFI
(Foreign Function Interface) issue. If another language can get at the
functionality, so can Python.

May 28 '06 #3

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