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[EVALUATION] - E02 - Support for MinGW Open Source Compiler

P: n/a
I'm a newcomer to python:

[EVALUATION] - E01: The Java Failure - May Python Helps?
http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...f0c5c35374f553

-

I've download (as suggested) the python 2.4 installer for windows.

Now I have problems to compile python extension that some packages
depend on.

I use the MinGW open-source compiler.

-

My questions:

a) Why does the Python Foundation not provide additionally a binary
version, compiled with MinGW or another open-source compiler?

b) Why does the Python Foundation not ensure, that the python
source-code is directly compilable with MinGW?

c) Why are the following efforts not _directly_ included in the python
source code base?

http://jove.prohosting.com/iwave/ipython/pyMinGW.html

above link found in this thread:

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...f0444c467de525

d) Is it really neccessary that I dive into such adventures, to be able
to do the most natural thing like: "developing python extensions with
MinGW"?

http://starship.python.net/crew/kern...w32/Notes.html

e) Is there any official statement available regarding the msvcr71.dll
and other MS licensing issues?

[see several threads "[Python-Dev] Is msvcr71.dll re-redistributable?"]

http://mail.python.org/pipermail/pyt...ry/thread.html

f) Are there any official (Python Foundation) statements / rationales
available, which explain why the MinGW compiler is unsupported, although
parts of the community obviously like to use it?

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...3474e6c8053336

-

I just want to understand.

Thankfull for any pointer to official documents / statements.

[google is _not_ a fried here. I like to have a stable development
environment, which is supported by the official projects, thus it can
pass quality-assurance without beeing afraid about every next release.]

..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05
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P: n/a
On 2005-02-15, bruno modulix <on***@xiludom.gro> wrote:
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
impressive.

but things are much simpler.


Could you be more prolific ?


Good god, let's hope not!

--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! I'm working under
at the direct orders of WAYNE
visi.com NEWTON to deport consenting
adults!
Jul 18 '05 #101

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
Adam DePrince wrote:
[...]
You're on it. You drive a car? You have to treat it right to get what
you want, right? Same here. Ask correctly, and you will get your
answers.


Your interpretation/definition of "asking correctly" is irrelevant to me.

"Interpretation is irrelevant. Logic is irrelevant. You will be
assimilated."

Jeff Shannon
Technician/Programmer
Credit International

Jul 18 '05 #102

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis a crit :
bruno modulix wrote:
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
(snip)

impressive.

but things are much simpler.
Could you be more prolific ?

Please explain the word "prolific".

Say more
Jul 18 '05 #103

P: n/a
In message <cu**********@usenet.otenet.gr>, Ilias Lazaridis
<il***@lazaridis.com> writes
MinGW compatibility is not [only] my need.

It is an community need [at least partially]


Clearly not. If it was, using your logic, it would already exist.
--
Stephen Kellett
Object Media Limited http://www.objmedia.demon.co.uk
RSI Information: http://www.objmedia.demon.co.uk/rsi.html
Jul 18 '05 #104

P: n/a
In message <cu**********@usenet.otenet.gr>, Ilias Lazaridis
<il***@lazaridis.com> writes
The community is everyone around python (including me at this moment).


Based on the communities response to you (and the similar response you
are getting in c.l.ruby) you are not a member of either community as you
continue to deliberately ignore the accepted norms of interaction with
the community. I'll list them here for you (again).

1) Do some research yourself (i.e try to answer your own questions)
2) When you have problems tell the group what you did, what the results
were and what the problem was.
3) If the community thinks you have done 1 and 2 you will most likely
get a helpful response. Some people will be generous and help you
anyway.
After a while people will realise you have no interest in doing any work
yourself and give you a hard time (the c.l.ruby group appear to have hit
this threshold today) until you mend your ways. Do 1 and 2 and you'll
get your questions answered much faster than your current approach.

The most amazing thing is the number of times you've been told this by
so many different people and so many different newsgroups and yet you
*still don't get it*.

Stephen
--
Stephen Kellett
Object Media Limited http://www.objmedia.demon.co.uk
RSI Information: http://www.objmedia.demon.co.uk/rsi.html
Jul 18 '05 #105

P: n/a
On Tue, 2005-02-15 at 17:24, Jeff Shannon wrote:
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
Adam DePrince wrote:
[...]
You're on it. You drive a car? You have to treat it right to get what
you want, right? Same here. Ask correctly, and you will get your
answers.

Your interpretation/definition of "asking correctly" is irrelevant to me.

"Interpretation is irrelevant. Logic is irrelevant. You will be
assimilated."


Oy! Logic is relevant ... let me explain.

Let this be a gentle reminder to all, the primary hazard of generosity
is that the recipient will lack a corresponding sense of appreciation.
I've heard others around here say that they will risk feeding a troll on
the off chance that they may actually enlighten someone.

Further investigation (http://lazaridis.com/core/project/email) suggests
that it is the Python community that is at fault. There is a scepter
haunting the python-list. Ilias, we misjudged you and mistook your
hyper efficiency and superior cognitive capacity for rudeness. As I
reflect upon this exchange I now see the inefficient absence of
terseness and lack of condescending ridicule. I call forth on all
Pythoners to adopt your style of thought, learn to spell Nietzsche, put
aside their personal consideration and accept their subservience to the
common good (as defined by Ilias) and the nubile newbie. Think of what
we could acheive. We could be just like gwbasic! As hip and modern as
the Kondrad Zuse's Z3. Pythoner's Unite!

Ilias, I ceed. You are a superman in the most misinterpreted sense of
the word. I invoke Gershwin's law and end this thread. May I bear
your children?
Adam DePrince
Jul 18 '05 #106

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis <il***@lazaridis.com> writes:
Mike Meyer wrote:
Ilias Lazaridis <il***@lazaridis.com> writes:
Mike Meyer wrote:

>It is an community need.

Based on the evidence at hand, this is a false statement.

It is an community need [at least partially]

Repeating a falsehood will not make it true.
Can you offer anything besides your own whining to back this claim
up?


please review my initial posting.


Done. Now answer the question.

<mike
--
Mike Meyer <mw*@mired.org> http://www.mired.org/home/mwm/
Independent WWW/Perforce/FreeBSD/Unix consultant, email for more information.
Jul 18 '05 #107

P: n/a
Michael Hoffman schrieb:
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
But don't act like the volunteers who develop Python owe you a version
of Python that runs out of the box on MinGW. They don't, anymore than you
owe *me* a version of Python that runs out of the box on MinGW.


Please, leave him alone. When he posted here first his tone made me
suspicious and I did some searching. Replies like yours are exactly
what he wants. He is here to fight and to waste your time. But if
you enjoy this ... go ahead ;) I don't so this will be my only post
in this thread.

--
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Peter Maas, M+R Infosysteme, D-52070 Aachen, Tel +49-241-93878-0
E-mail 'cGV0ZXIubWFhc0BtcGx1c3IuZGU=\n'.decode('base64')
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Jul 18 '05 #108

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis schrieb:
I'm a newcomer to python:


Sorry, I'm breaking my promise to post only once to this thread. But
I've found the ultimate recipe to resolve all issues of this and
other similar threads:

Please read

http://nobelprize.org/medicine/educational/pavlov/

and then do something useful :)

--
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Peter Maas, M+R Infosysteme, D-52070 Aachen, Tel +49-241-93878-0
E-mail 'cGV0ZXIubWFhc0BtcGx1c3IuZGU=\n'.decode('base64')
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Jul 18 '05 #109

P: n/a

"Peter Maas" <pe***@somewhere.com> wrote in message
news:cu**********@swifty.westend.com...
http://nobelprize.org/medicine/educational/pavlov/

and then do something useful :)


Thanks. I showed this to my daughter, who enjoyed the game, and explained
your point re Pavlov posting, and about Pavlov advertising, etc. She then
went on to some of the other games. A good home-learning tool.

Terry J. Reedy

Jul 18 '05 #110

P: n/a
Stephen Kellett wrote:
[...]

closing thread
http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...ae9cdbe16676d1

..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #112

P: n/a
Mike Meyer wrote:
[...]

closing thread
http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...ae9cdbe16676d1

..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #113

P: n/a
Bruno Desthuilliers wrote:
[...]

closing thread
http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...ae9cdbe16676d1

..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #114

P: n/a
Peter Maas wrote:
Ilias Lazaridis schrieb:
I'm a newcomer to python:

Sorry, I'm breaking my promise to post only once to this thread.


I'm breaking my 'promise' to close this thread.
But I've found the ultimate recipe to resolve all issues of this and
other similar threads:

Please read

http://nobelprize.org/medicine/educational/pavlov/

and then do something useful :)


I don't think that this would change the disastrous communication
behaviour of the python community [1]. For sure it has not changed yours.

And I don't think that this would change anything on the huge amounts of
off-topic posts [including yours, and of course my reply to yours].

This thread proofs simply the inability of this community [1] to focus
on a simple essence.

-

[1] community: the publically writing, within c.l.python

..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #115

P: n/a
In message <cv**********@usenet.otenet.gr>, Ilias Lazaridis
<il***@lazaridis.com> writes
This thread proofs simply the inability of this community [1] to focus
on a simple essence.


Incorrect analysis. This thread proves that you have no concept of how
to interact with the community. If you had done what many people asked
you to do, which is do some work yourself, then ask questions about the
few answers you didn't discover yourself, you would have got lots of
helpful answers. You were told this many times by many people. Also on
the odd occasion someone did proffer some on-topic advice, sometimes in
long articles that must have taken some time to produce you'd dismiss
the article with "It is not on topic, I have not read it". How could you
know if it is not on topic if you don't read it? Apart from the gross
rudeness in such an attitude it demonstrates your arrogance, selfishness
and utter contempt for those replying to you.

And then you have the gall to blame your failure on others...

Next you'll be telling me the world is flat and held up by an infinite
array of tortoises.
--
Stephen Kellett
Object Media Limited http://www.objmedia.demon.co.uk
RSI Information: http://www.objmedia.demon.co.uk/rsi.html
Jul 18 '05 #116

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis <il***@lazaridis.com> writes:
This thread proofs simply the inability of this community [1] to focus
on a simple essence.


Many communities extend a sort of "provisional membership" to new
arrivals, and grant newcomers the same respect and courtesy that
established members recieve. I make this distinction to point out that
you are not a member of the Python community simply because you posted
in a community newsgroup, but a newcomer with provisional status.
I don't speak for the Python community, but from the consistent nature
of the responses to your posts, it looks like your provisional
membership has been revoked.

Secondly, when two parties disagree about matters of etiquette, the
party that is new to the community is almost certainly the one who has
erred.

I think you could undo the damage you have done by spending some time
here, and learning that this is a community of intelligent, friendly,
humorous, and insightful people. Come with suggestions, and not
demands. Show us how you would like a community to behave, instead of
acting like we owe you something.

That's how we make the world a better place.

Nick

--
# sigmask || 0.2 || 20030107 || public domain || feed this to a python
print reduce(lambda x,y:x+chr(ord(y)-1),' Ojdl!Wbshjti!=obwAcboefstobudi/psh?')
Jul 18 '05 #117

P: n/a
On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 18:49:38 +0000, Stephen Kellett wrote:
Incorrect analysis. This thread proves that you have no concept of how
to interact with the community. If you had done what many people asked
you to do, which is do some work yourself, then ask questions about the
few answers you didn't discover yourself, you would have got lots of
helpful answers. You were told this many times by many people. Also on
the odd occasion someone did proffer some on-topic advice, sometimes in
long articles that must have taken some time to produce you'd dismiss
the article with "It is not on topic, I have not read it". How could you
know if it is not on topic if you don't read it? Apart from the gross
rudeness in such an attitude it demonstrates your arrogance, selfishness
and utter contempt for those replying to you.


This is why I bailed on him, especially after the troll warning which
is now fully justified in my mind. I'm 99% positive that I could ship him
source code that meets every single one of his demands, and he'd *still*
be bitching and posting, because he *would not realize it*, because of
course he'd still have to read docs and learn how to use it.

Moderately on topic (not Python, but programming at least): The other day
I was talking to someone and I commented on how odd it is to write a
library, and *still* have to learn how to use it correctly. As the
author, at least I can change it as I learn more, but even so, I have to
learn how to use it; even as the author I am not imbued magically with
expert status.

I actually think that 95% of what Ilias is claiming to be looking for is
there, packaged up and almost ready to go. But he will never realize that,
since we can't jump him to expert status in a four-line newsgroup post,
so, *shrug*, he loses I guess.
Jul 18 '05 #118

P: n/a
In message <pa****************************@jerf.org>, Jeremy Bowers
<je**@jerf.org> writes
course he'd still have to read docs and learn how to use it.
Yeah - one guy in c.l.ruby wrote a reply that must have taken minimum 30
minutes. Really detailed. Lots of people thanked him for it. Ilias
dissed the whole post with "I have not read it, it is not on topic".
Moderately on topic (not Python, but programming at least): The other day
I was talking to someone and I commented on how odd it is to write a
library, and *still* have to learn how to use it correctly. As the
author, at least I can change it as I learn more, but even so, I have to
learn how to use it; even as the author I am not imbued magically with
expert status.


Indeed. I often find myself going back to a library I wrote some time
ago which I haven't had to interact with and then looking for the
existing code that interacts with the library to see how best to use it.
I think its a bit like going back to a book after a few years. Its worth
returning because you will have forgotten some of what was so good first
time around.

Stephen
--
Stephen Kellett
Object Media Limited http://www.objmedia.demon.co.uk
RSI Information: http://www.objmedia.demon.co.uk/rsi.html
Jul 18 '05 #119

P: n/a
On Thu, Feb 17, 2005 at 06:49:38PM +0000, Stephen Kellett wrote:
Next you'll be telling me the world is flat and held up by an infinite
array of tortoises.


no, of course not! It's an iterator.

--
John Lenton (jo**@grulic.org.ar) -- Random fortune:
Test-tube babies shouldn't throw stones.

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Jul 18 '05 #120

P: n/a
Terry Reedy schrieb:
"Peter Maas" <pe***@somewhere.com> wrote in message
news:cu**********@swifty.westend.com...
http://nobelprize.org/medicine/educational/pavlov/

and then do something useful :)

Thanks. I showed this to my daughter, who enjoyed the game, and explained
your point re Pavlov posting, and about Pavlov advertising, etc.


Fine that at least one person benefitted from my post :) I came across
this when I browsed through the Lazaridis thread which was - if for
nothing else - good for some laughs.

But at the same time I felt uncomfortable to see how many bright
Pythoneers cared to give well thought, helpful and friendly answers
to somebody who was acting unpolite and kind of stupid, even mechanical.
This newsgroup is used to be helpful to newbies and Lazaridis was
ringing the newbie bell.

Perhaps we will soon see a triumphant publication with the title
"Ilias Lazaridis - the ELIZA of the 21st century. A milestone towards
the perfect Turing test" ;)

--
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Peter Maas, M+R Infosysteme, D-52070 Aachen, Tel +49-241-93878-0
E-mail 'cGV0ZXIubWFhc0BtcGx1c3IuZGU=\n'.decode('base64')
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Jul 18 '05 #121

P: n/a
Stephen Kellett wrote:
In message <cv**********@usenet.otenet.gr>, Ilias Lazaridis
<il***@lazaridis.com> writes
This thread proofs simply the inability of this community [1] to focus
on a simple essence.

Incorrect analysis. This thread proves that you have no concept of how
to interact with the community. If you had done what many people asked
you to do, which is do some work yourself, then ask questions about the
few answers you didn't discover yourself, you would have got lots of
helpful answers. You were told this many times by many people. Also on
the odd occasion someone did proffer some on-topic advice, sometimes in
long articles that must have taken some time to produce you'd dismiss
the article with "It is not on topic, I have not read it". How could you
know if it is not on topic if you don't read it? Apart from the gross
rudeness in such an attitude it demonstrates your arrogance, selfishness
and utter contempt for those replying to you.

And then you have the gall to blame your failure on others...

Next you'll be telling me the world is flat and held up by an infinite
array of tortoises.


Actually I suspect Ilias is trying to carry out his own sort of 'survey'
on how various communities respond to questions asked in the kind of way
he asked them ... See his web site.

David
Jul 18 '05 #122

P: n/a
In message <cv**********@ctb-nnrp2.saix.net>, David Fraser
<da****@sjsoft.com> writes
Actually I suspect Ilias is trying to carry out his own sort of
'survey' on how various communities respond to questions asked in the
kind of way he asked them ... See his web site.


Its as unreadable as his network news postings. One of the first things
I did was check out his website. I didn't gain a lot as it is written in
his typical automaton style. It actively discourages you from engaging.
Thats quite an achievement for a static piece of text.

Stephen
--
Stephen Kellett
Object Media Limited http://www.objmedia.demon.co.uk
RSI Information: http://www.objmedia.demon.co.uk/rsi.html
Jul 18 '05 #123

P: n/a
In message <cv**********@swifty.westend.com>, Peter Maas
<pe***@somewhere.com> writes
Perhaps we will soon see a triumphant publication with the title
"Ilias Lazaridis - the ELIZA of the 21st century. A milestone towards
the perfect Turing test" ;)


I've got to admit that for a large proportion of the time interacting
(if that is the word) with him I thought I was the butt of a clever AI
joke. I've finally come to the conclusion that there is a real, if
seriously dysfunctional, person behind the communications.

If I knew more about the AI subject arena AND had more time on my hands
I'd try to write an IlliasBot to see how far I got before I was found
out. But I'm way too busy, so someone else will have to do it. I just
hope they do it in Python or Ruby so that these languages get more
publicity.

Stephen
--
Stephen Kellett
Object Media Limited http://www.objmedia.demon.co.uk
RSI Information: http://www.objmedia.demon.co.uk/rsi.html
Jul 18 '05 #124

P: n/a
Peter Maas:
Perhaps we will soon see a triumphant publication with the title
"Ilias Lazaridis - the ELIZA of the 21st century. A milestone towards
the perfect Turing test" ;)


<ILI>as la<ZA>ridis

Neil
Jul 18 '05 #125

P: n/a
[this is a summary of a private conversation that I had with the
developer of the phMinGW. It contains just my comments. I've send
additionally a CC via email (private-to-public switch notification)]

-

A.B., Khalid wrote:
[...]

Khalid,

first of all I like to thank you for the efforts you have taken to
provide pyMinGW to the python community.

I would like to assist you with your efforts, see below.
If passing all the regression tests of the official Windows Python
distribution is an indication of the quality of patch-- and pyMinGW
patched and MinGW built Python does pass all of them-- then one is
inclined to say that pyMinGW is a good patch.

=> {pyMinGW is a good patch}
The reason why it is, on the other hand, not included in the official
distribution is threefold.

1. Contrary to what many might imagine, I don't think enough people
use MinGW to frankly justify any extra effort beyond pyMinGW.

The defined "extra effort" is the effort to provide the patches for the
main source-code base?

If you can send me an email of how to do this, I would take this effort.

of course I must first know, that the python-team would accept those
patches (technical applicability provided).

Thus this can wait, until an official response.
2. Given number 1 above, this patch, I believe, and I could be
mistaken, must not rush to be included in Python's core;

Of course you are right.
people like your esteemed person should test it (note that it is
designed not to interfere with your trusted and working official
Python, if any);

=> {trusted and working official python}

: it is
only when enough people do such testing that there will be a case for
it to be included in Python's core.

I agree with you.

If you are willing to extend your project, thus the intrested community
members can collaborate, I would like to assist you to do so.

I would try to take away all setup efforts from you.
3. Finally. there is nothing wrong with third-party patches if they
get the job done, which I believe is the case with pyMinGW.

You have stated above: "trusted and working official python"

The main goal would be, to get a "trusted and working official python"
based on MinGW, _within_ the official source-code-base.

The secondary goal would be, to get a "trusted and working official
python" based on MinGW, _with_ a very close to the official
source-code-base (possibly with just one #define).

-

Please contact me vial email if you are intrested.
Regards, Khalid

Best Regards,

ILIAS LAZARIDIS

-
-
-

After some comments, [which did not show to me an intrested of making
the above happen (which is fully in the developers rights)], I've
simplified my suggestions in the following message:
"
thank you for your comments.

I will express my suggestion more practically

* as a first step, I would setup a pyMinGW mailinglist
* intrested people can come together an communicate
* as a second step, I would setup an SVN
* intrested projects could get your patch via SVN
* as a third step, I would find intrested contributors
* which would help testing
* which would help you with coding

All this could happen without (or with very low) efforts for you.
"

-
-
-

I got no answer.

-
-
-

..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #126

P: n/a
It looks like here the only worth words are yours. Didn't
you close this thread?

I will refresh your mind with your own unpolite way:

"""
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
[...]

closing thread
http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...ae9cdbe16676d1
"""

Anyway, I will add some comments:
The defined "extra effort" is the effort to provide the patches for the
main source-code base?

If you can send me an email of how to do this, I would take this effort. Good for you.
of course I must first know, that the python-team would accept those
patches (technical applicability provided). There is no guaranty. Did you forget the reply from Tim Peters:
[...] A problem is that a
patch won't get reviewed unless a volunteer does a review, and we've
got an increasing backlog of unreviewed patches because of that. The
most effective way for a person P to get their patch reviewed now is
for P to volunteer to review 5 other patches first. There are a few
Python developers who have promised, in return, to review P's patch
then. So, you will have to review some patches first.

Ilias> Now, can you please tell me the process I have to follow to
Ilias> suggest the following (to the PSF or to the programmers or to
Ilias> the decision takers),possibly to get at least a vote on it: Tim> No such thing will happen -- forget that. For MinGW to be
Tim> supported forever, it's necessary and sufficient that a specific
Tim> person volunteer to support MinGW forever. If that person goes
Tim> away, so does the support they provided; it's the same story for
Tim> Cygwin, and even for Linux and native Windows.

So, it is not just making the patch. You will have to compromise to
support it and not just go away.
Regards,
Josef
Jul 18 '05 #127

P: n/a
Josef Meile wrote:
It looks like here the only worth words are yours. Didn't
you close this thread?
yes, but when reviewing again I found this lack [created by myself due
to private conversation].
I will refresh your mind with your own unpolite way:
I find this very polite [to notify conversation partners instead of
letting them wait for an answer].
"""
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
[...]

closing thread
http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...ae9cdbe16676d1
"""

Anyway, I will add some comments:

[...]

The first step is to make a pyMinGW project.

If one is intrested, he has possibly more luck [than I had] to convince
the author of pyMinGW.

Good luck.

..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #128

P: n/a
Robert Kern schreef:
And yet there is not one company that has someone devoted full-time to
developing Python.


Except for 'future Python' aka PyPy...
<http://codespeak.net/pipermail/pypy-dev/2004q4/001696.html>

:)

--
JanC

"Be strict when sending and tolerant when receiving."
RFC 1958 - Architectural Principles of the Internet - section 3.9
Jul 18 '05 #129

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
The first step is to make a pyMinGW project.

You are mistaken. The first steps are the following:

1) Realizing that a project _must_ start not because you want it to,
but because those who are willing to work on it think it is worth the
extra effort for it to.

2) Realizing that what best scratches your back is non other than your
own nails. No one is going to do any extra effort for you (or anyone
else for that matter) if they have some good reason not to. And both
the author of pyMinGW and Tim have already given enough reasons for
those who wondered why there is no official Python support for the
MinGW compiler earlier in this very thread.

3) Realizing that there _is_ already a project called pyMinGW! That it
does not fit your requirements-- whatever these maybe-- is an
altogether different issue. The fact of the matter remains that a
project _does_ exist, one which people (including myself) do in fact
use; and because it does exist there is no reason to "make" it.

If one is intrested, he has possibly more luck [than I had] to convince the author of pyMinGW.


Of what? To make pyMinGW? To do extra work to your liking that was
shown to be nnnecessary especially when pyMinGW can currently get the
job done? Let alone the free compiler available for all to use?

Whether you realize it or not, those who are interested will download
pyMinGW and will test it and they will use it if they find it useful.
It is their choice to do so. It is apparent that not only have you not
done that, but that you also seem not interested in doing so. That too
is your choice. I suspect that no one is going to lose sleep over
either choice. I hope I don't come across as condescending, which I
hope I never am, but I know I won't. Life goes on.
Khalid

--
pyMinGW:
http://jove.prohosting.com/iwave/ipython/pyMinGW.html

Jul 18 '05 #130

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis <il***@lazaridis.com> writes:
Duncan Booth wrote:

[...]
It is GPL licensed with an amendment which prevents the GPL
spreading to other open source software with which it is linked.
"In accordance with section 10 of the GPL, Red Hat, Inc. permits
programs whose sources are distributed under a license that complies
with the Open Source definition to be linked with libcygwin.a
without libcygwin.a itself causing the resulting program to be
covered by the GNU GPL."


If I understand this right, I cannot produce commercial software with
the cygwin toolset.


You cannot produce proprietary software with that toolset.

--
Please excuse my spelling as I suffer from agraphia. See
http://dformosa.zeta.org.au/~dformosa/Spelling.html to find out more.
Free the Memes.
Jul 18 '05 #131

P: n/a
A.B., Khalid wrote:
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
The first step is to make a pyMinGW project.
You are mistaken. The first steps are the following:

[...] - (nonrelevant comments)
3) Realizing that there _is_ already a project called pyMinGW! That it
does not fit your requirements-- whatever these maybe-- is an
altogether different issue. The fact of the matter remains that a
project _does_ exist, one which people (including myself) do in fact
use; and because it does exist there is no reason to "make" it. [...]

I've already understood your viewpoint.

I've realized, that there is a single-person-centric project
"pyMinGW" which does not encourage collaboration (due to missing public
resources like mailinglist).

My requirements about an open-source project (or sub-project) are very
simple:
a communication resource,
a code-repository,
an issue-tracking-system.

I've suggested you to transform your personal project to a collaborative
project, starting with an dedicated mailinglist etc.:

"
thank you for your comments.

I will express my suggestion more practically

* as a first step, I would setup a pyMinGW mailinglist
* intrested people can come together an communicate
* as a second step, I would setup an SVN
* intrested projects could get your patch via SVN
* as a third step, I would find intrested contributors
* which would help testing
* which would help you with coding

All this could happen without (or with very low) efforts for you.
"

-

You have the right to refuse this.

I (and any other reader) have the right to derive our conclusions about
you and the reasons that you refuse a _real_ collaborative work.

..
--
pyMinGW:
http://jove.prohosting.com/iwave/ipython/pyMinGW.html


..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #132

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
My questions:
It appears that nobody has answered the questions, yet.
a) Why does the Python Foundation not provide additionally a binary
version, compiled with MinGW or another open-source compiler?
We don't have the resources to do that.
b) Why does the Python Foundation not ensure, that the python
source-code is directly compilable with MinGW?
In the past, we did not do that because we did not know how to do it.
With Python 2.4.1, we now had a contribution that should allow direct
compilation of extensions using MingW.
c) Why are the following efforts not _directly_ included in the python
source code base?

http://jove.prohosting.com/iwave/ipython/pyMinGW.html
I believe this was because it was never contributed to Python.
d) Is it really neccessary that I dive into such adventures, to be able
to do the most natural thing like: "developing python extensions with
MinGW"?

http://starship.python.net/crew/kern...w32/Notes.html
No. These instructions are outdated.
e) Is there any official statement available regarding the msvcr71.dll
and other MS licensing issues?

[see several threads "[Python-Dev] Is msvcr71.dll re-redistributable?"]

http://mail.python.org/pipermail/pyt...ry/thread.html
No, there isn't.
f) Are there any official (Python Foundation) statements / rationales
available, which explain why the MinGW compiler is unsupported, although
parts of the community obviously like to use it?

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...3474e6c8053336


The official statement is that the MingW compiler is supported, indeed.

Regards,
Martin
Jul 18 '05 #133

P: n/a
Martin v. Lwis wrote:
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
My questions:
It appears that nobody has answered the questions, yet.
a) Why does the Python Foundation not provide additionally a binary
version, compiled with MinGW or another open-source compiler?


We don't have the resources to do that.


Should a professional developer take python serious?

I mean, if the team does not manage at least the foundation of a
multi-target automated-build-process?

[targets need not to be supported directly by the python team. They
could be added/managed/maintained by community members]
b) Why does the Python Foundation not ensure, that the python
source-code is directly compilable with MinGW?


In the past, we did not do that because we did not know how to do it.
With Python 2.4.1, we now had a contribution that should allow direct
compilation of extensions using MingW.


I'm refering to compile the main python source-code with MigGW.

[As a result, compilation of extensions under MinGW becomes trivial]
c) Why are the following efforts not _directly_ included in the python
source code base?

http://jove.prohosting.com/iwave/ipython/pyMinGW.html


I believe this was because it was never contributed to Python.


ok

You should possibly engourage the author to create an collaborative project.
d) Is it really neccessary that I dive into such adventures, to be
able to do the most natural thing like: "developing python extensions
with MinGW"?

http://starship.python.net/crew/kern...w32/Notes.html


No. These instructions are outdated.


ok

[the author has placed a remark now, avoiding this way further
missunderstandings.]
e) Is there any official statement available regarding the msvcr71.dll
and other MS licensing issues?

[see several threads "[Python-Dev] Is msvcr71.dll re-redistributable?"]

http://mail.python.org/pipermail/pyt...ry/thread.html


No, there isn't.


Seeing the discussions which raise around this topic, I think the
foundation should provide an official statement [e.g. contact MS to get
an official statement].
f) Are there any official (Python Foundation) statements / rationales
available, which explain why the MinGW compiler is unsupported,
although parts of the community obviously like to use it?

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...3474e6c8053336


The official statement is that the MingW compiler is supported, indeed.


Thus the official statement should be possibly corrected.

* Compiling Python source-code under MinGW is not directly supported.
* Compliling extensions under MinGW leads possibly to problems.
Regards,
Martin


..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #134

P: n/a
> Should a professional developer take python serious?

Unnecessary and deliberately provoking question - python is taken seriously,
e.g. by multi-billion dollar companies like google and zope. You OTH have
provided no evidence so far that you can be taken seriously as a developer
of whatever kind - neither professional nor hobbyist. So one has to
question the relevance of your demands.
I mean, if the team does not manage at least the foundation of a
multi-target automated-build-process?


Plain wrong. The team does very well manage that process - for a large
variety of platforms and compilers. Just not the compiler you perceive as
being a necessity. But that dead horse has been beaten enough already.
--
Regards,

Diez B. Roggisch
Jul 18 '05 #135

P: n/a
> Unnecessary and deliberately provoking question - python is taken
seriously, e.g. by multi-billion dollar companies like google and zope.


Of course zope corporation is not amongst the multi-billion dollar companies
- by now. But who knows :)

--
Regards,

Diez B. Roggisch
Jul 18 '05 #136

P: n/a
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
Should a professional developer take python serious?

[...] - (ungentle babbling after disrupting coherence of writings)

"
Should a professional developer take python serious?

I mean, if the team does not manage at least the foundation of a
multi-target automated-build-process?

[targets need not to be supported directly by the python team. They
could be added/managed/maintained by community members]
"

..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #137

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
Should a professional developer take python serious?
[...] - (ungentle babbling after disrupting coherence of writings)


And that from you.... *lol*
I mean, if the team does not manage at least the foundation of a
multi-target automated-build-process?
Repeating nonsense doesn't increase it's validity. Python makes use of
autoconf/automake to support a wide range of platforms and compilers. As
you obviously haven't heard of these and refuse to google, I was so kind to
research the respective links to the tools:

http://www.gnu.org/software/autoconf/
http://www.gnu.org/software/automake/

http://www.amath.washington.edu/~lf/tutorials/autoconf/

Enjoy the read.
[targets need not to be supported directly by the python team. They
could be added/managed/maintained by community members]


You already found the mingw-patch for building python. It is
added/managed/maintained by community members.

Just out of curiousity: How many python extensions are you planning to
write? And how many lines of pure python code have you written in your
life?

--
Regards,

Diez B. Roggisch
Jul 18 '05 #138

P: n/a
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
Should a professional developer take python serious?[...] - (ungentle babbling after disrupting coherence of writings)


And that from you.... *lol*


Of course.

I respect the "coherence of writings" of my conversation partners.

[If they are in-topic / in-context]
I mean, if the team does not manage at least the foundation of a
multi-target automated-build-process?


Repeating nonsense doesn't increase it's validity. Python makes use of

[...] - (babbling, gentle links)

Thank you for the links.

They are irrelevant for me.

But other readers for sure will enjoy.

-

The automated-build-process-system should allow community-members to add
their targets into an special "incubation section", which does not in
any way affect the "main section" (which contains the official
production targets).

If an "incubation section" target proves over time as stable and
supported, it is moved to the "official-auto-build".
[targets need not to be supported directly by the python team. They
could be added/managed/maintained by community members]


You already found the mingw-patch for building python. It is
added/managed/maintained by community members.


This is a one-man-show, which does not invite to open collaboration
(feedback is requested to closed email):

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...fa42dabff68db2

python [foundation, crew, dictator, ...] should engourage open
collaboration, should engourage _collaboration_.
Just out of curiousity: How many python extensions are you planning to
write?
I estimate 10 to 100, depending on abstractional capabilities of the
extension system.
And how many lines of pure python code have you written in your life?


0 (zero).

..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #139

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
Should a professional developer take python serious?


yes.

</F>

Jul 18 '05 #140

P: n/a
> Thank you for the links.

They are irrelevant for me.


As usual.
Just out of curiousity: How many python extensions are you planning to
write?


I estimate 10 to 100, depending on abstractional capabilities of the
extension system.
And how many lines of pure python code have you written in your life?


0 (zero).


Awesome. Without any lines of code written, you have already identified the
areas where python lacks features that have to be overcome with C-written
extensions. As usual, I stand with my mouth agape over your near-psychic
abilities to analyze even the complexest matters without any actual
fiddling with the nitty gritty details.

The day where you team up with Uri Geller - who will make even the worst
code running by just putting a printout of it on top of an image of the
master himself - is to be feared by all of us humble developers who
actually _deal_ with problems.

--
Regards,

Diez B. Roggisch
Jul 18 '05 #141

P: n/a
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
Thank you for the links.

They are irrelevant for me.
As usual.


sorry.
Just out of curiousity: How many python extensions are you planning to
write?


I estimate 10 to 100, depending on abstractional capabilities of the
extension system.
And how many lines of pure python code have you written in your life?


0 (zero).


Awesome. Without any lines of code written, you have already identified the
areas where python lacks features that have to be overcome with C-written
extensions.


writing code is not the only way.
As usual, I stand with my mouth agape over your near-psychic
abilities to analyze even the complexest matters without any actual
fiddling with the nitty gritty details.
Nothing special.

Abstraction, Generalization, Inhibition.
The day where you team up with Uri Geller - who will make even the worst
code running by just putting a printout of it on top of an image of the
master himself - is to be feared by all of us humble developers who
actually _deal_ with problems.


Don't worry.

Mr. Geller will be shortly hired by Sun Microsystems.

..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #142

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
A.B., Khalid wrote:
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
The first step is to make a pyMinGW project.
You are mistaken. The first steps are the following:

[...] - (nonrelevant comments)
3) Realizing that there _is_ already a project called pyMinGW! That it does not fit your requirements-- whatever these maybe-- is an
altogether different issue. The fact of the matter remains that a
project _does_ exist, one which people (including myself) do in fact use; and because it does exist there is no reason to "make" it.

[...]

I've already understood your viewpoint.

You just say that you do. Your repeating the same arguments using the
same logic testifies that you don't.


My requirements about an open-source project (or sub-project) are very simple:

Your "requirements" are just what they are, _your_ requirements. And
since they are so, maybe you'd like to address them yourself instead of
continuing to complain how "your requirements" (simple or otherwise)
are not being met and that hence the author of this project is this,
and/or the entire language is that. Enough said here.

You have the right to refuse this.

I (and any other reader) have the right to derive our conclusions about you and the reasons that you refuse a _real_ collaborative work.

Of course I have the right to do what I like (and as regards pyMinGW
this was explained earlier in this thread); your mere pronunciation
that I have that right neither subtracts nor adds to it one iota. And
it seems to me that the community has indeed reached some conclusions
which any reasonable person with a fair grasp of English can quickly
identify from the nature of their responses to you, here and elsewhere.

You already found the mingw-patch for building python. It is
added/managed/maintained by community members.


This is a one-man-show, which does not invite to open collaboration
(feedback is requested to closed email):

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...fa42dabff68db2
python [foundation, crew, dictator, ...] should engourage open
collaboration, should engourage _collaboration_.

Oh well, I hope it would not come as a shock to you that pyMinGW does
allow collaboration. Here is a quote from the pyMinGW-24 changes
document:

---------------------
pyMinGW-24-0064: Dec 11th, 2004
---------------------
[1] Included \PC\pyconfig.h in the Python24.iss. Thanks to Matthias
Gondan for the report and the fix.
Quoted from http://jove.prohosting.com/iwave/ipy...yMinGW-24.html
So you see, the collaborative effort is there. It is just not
responding to "your requirements" to your liking that is bothering you!
Now if you want to continue complaining about how "your requirements"
are not being met, by volunteers who make their work available for free
in their spare time, to your liking, go ahead. Knock yourself out.
Khalid

--
pyMinGW:
http://jove.prohosting.com/iwave/ipython/pyMinGW.html

Jul 18 '05 #143

P: n/a
Pat
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
Just out of curiousity: How many python extensions are you planning to write?
I estimate 10 to 100, depending on abstractional capabilities of the extension system.
And how many lines of pure python code have you written in your
life?
0 (zero).


Awesome. Without any lines of code written, you have already

identified the areas where python lacks features that have to be overcome with C-written extensions. As usual, I stand with my mouth agape over your near-psychic abilities to analyze even the complexest matters without any actual
fiddling with the nitty gritty details.


If you put yourself into the shoes of someone who decides to use a
Python product that requires compiling, and that product contains C
extensions that also need compiling, you'll see that it doesn't matter
whether or not that individual has actually written a single line of
Python themselves. If the compiling process is not easy, then that
user will be forced to fiddle with nitty gritty details about which
they'd rather remain ignorant.

On Linux, I've installed and used/compiled products in a variety of
languages in which I've never written a single line of source code
myself. In most cases the process works fairly well. When it doesn't,
I'm forced to fiddle with nitty gritty details about which I'd rather
remain ignorant. The result is usually a good deal of frustration and
anger on my part.

On Windows, most users are used to installing precompiled binary
packages, rather than compiling from source. When you do have to
compile from source, it often requires you to fiddle with nitty gritty
details about which you'd rather remain ignorant. The less fiddling
required, the happier the user will be, and the easier it will be for
that product to get adopted on that platform. No psychic abilities are
required. No Python abilities are required, either, for that matter.
;-)

--
Patrick K. O'Brien
Orbtech http://www.orbtech.com
Schevo http://www.schevo.org
Pypersyst http://www.pypersyst.org

Jul 18 '05 #144

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
Should a professional developer take python serious?


Yes.

Regards,
Martin
Jul 18 '05 #145

P: n/a
A.B., Khalid wrote:
[...] - (comments)

I've just overflown your comments for a few seconds.

And I got my confirmations.

Thank you for your time.
--
pyMinGW:
http://jove.prohosting.com/iwave/ipython/pyMinGW.html


..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #146

P: n/a
Fredrik Lundh wrote:
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
Should a professional developer take python serious?


yes.


Should I take answers serious?

Answer from people which do not respect coherence of writings?

"
Should a professional developer take python serious?

I mean, if the team does not manage at least the foundation of a
multi-target automated-build-process?

[targets need not to be supported directly by the python team. They
could be added/managed/maintained by community members]
"

..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #147

P: n/a
Martin v. Lwis wrote:
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
Should a professional developer take python serious?


Yes.


Should I take answers serious?

Answer from people which do not respect coherence of writings?

"
Should a professional developer take python serious?

I mean, if the team does not manage at least the foundation of a
multi-target automated-build-process?

[targets need not to be supported directly by the python team. They
could be added/managed/maintained by community members]
"

..

--
http://lazaridis.com
Jul 18 '05 #148

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
Should a professional developer take python serious?


yes.

</F>

Jul 18 '05 #149

P: n/a
Ilias Lazaridis wrote:
Should a professional developer take python serious?
yes.


Should I take answers serious?


yes.
Answer from people which do not respect coherence of writings?


coherence of writings?

</F>

Jul 18 '05 #150

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