By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
443,768 Members | 2,004 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 443,768 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Employablity of python programmers

P: n/a
Hi,

Here I am once again to give a bit trouble.

I am at the verge of completing my graduation in computer sciences. I
will be graduating within 6-8 months. Now I am faced with the problems
of my career. I am in a fix what skill set I must choose to be safe as
far as job openings are concerned. I understand that skill set should
be that one like most but job is also important. I will try to achieve
a balance in both with the help of you advice.

I am currently developing in PHP as a freelance web developer. But I
want to move to python(for all it all cool reasons discussed a zillion
times on c.l.py) and wanted to know the job oportunites available to a
python programmer(I know these have been also discussed a zillion time
here but still..). I am living in India and would like to know about
employability of python programmers in India (I know that a few Indians
frequent c.l.py. Hello Sridhar, where are you).

I would also like to know that if the knowledge of any other language
will boost employability of a python programmer. As far as I see it,
the following combination are desirable.

1) C/C++ and Python.
2) Java and Python.
3) Pure Python.

Out of the three Java along with python seems to be straight forward
choice as far as employability is concerned. But I would like to know
the benifits which one is a better career choice to take out of these
three choices(other suggestions are welcome). For me choice three would
be better, not because I have only one language to learn. If I choose
choice three I could spend more time in learning different approaches
to develop the application and better master the library and frameworks
avaialble for python.

So what are the recomendations from your side. Please help.
Thanks
---
Mir Nazim.

Jul 18 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
2 Replies


P: n/a
Hi,

I program in Python -- but not at work. There are very few
opportunities for Python work in India. As of now, at least. (If
somebody else has better information, please correct me.)

A lot of people _do_ use Python, but not many organizations use it.

Okay, as an aside, as a computer _science_ graduate, a programming
language alone should not decide what career you choose. Nor should
you choose a career based on the liking of a particular language
alone.

And I kinda don't understand this idea of "choosing what's best". How
do you define "what is best"? I guess you should do what you like --
and not something that is "in demand".

My 2 paisas. :)

On 17 Jan 2005 07:09:09 -0800, Mir Nazim <mi******@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,

Here I am once again to give a bit trouble.

I am at the verge of completing my graduation in computer sciences. I
will be graduating within 6-8 months. Now I am faced with the problems
of my career. I am in a fix what skill set I must choose to be safe as
far as job openings are concerned. I understand that skill set should
be that one like most but job is also important. I will try to achieve
a balance in both with the help of you advice.

I am currently developing in PHP as a freelance web developer. But I
want to move to python(for all it all cool reasons discussed a zillion
times on c.l.py) and wanted to know the job oportunites available to a
python programmer(I know these have been also discussed a zillion time
here but still..). I am living in India and would like to know about
employability of python programmers in India (I know that a few Indians
frequent c.l.py. Hello Sridhar, where are you).

I would also like to know that if the knowledge of any other language
will boost employability of a python programmer. As far as I see it,
the following combination are desirable.

1) C/C++ and Python.
2) Java and Python.
3) Pure Python.

Out of the three Java along with python seems to be straight forward
choice as far as employability is concerned. But I would like to know
the benifits which one is a better career choice to take out of these
three choices(other suggestions are welcome). For me choice three would
be better, not because I have only one language to learn. If I choose
choice three I could spend more time in learning different approaches
to develop the application and better master the library and frameworks
avaialble for python.

So what are the recomendations from your side. Please help.
Thanks
---
Mir Nazim.

--
http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list

--
Premshree Pillai
http://www.livejournal.com/~premshree
Jul 18 '05 #2

P: n/a
Mir Nazim <mi******@gmail.com> wrote:
I am in a fix what skill set I must choose to be safe as
far as job openings are concerned. 1) C/C++ and Python.
2) Java and Python.
3) Pure Python.


As for pure employability, I'd choose option 2, but as a person that
wants something more than employment from my work life, I'd like to
share something with you:

A while ago I decided that to be happy I had to decide what I wanted,
*really* go after those things, and believe that the rewards would
follow. For me Python had a big part to play in that, so I recently
started looking for a new job, even though I already had one that was
promising and secure. It also meant being willing to move myself and my
family far from or home, friends, and other family members to take that
new job.

If we were willing to make big changes (and the accompanying
sacrifices), we were going to make the most of it: I wouldn't accept
anything but the right job, at the right company, with the right
environment where they really needed *me*. I spent hours researching
openings and companies and sent out many resumes with the hopes of
finding that *one* job. Two weeks later, I was fortunate enough to
begin talks with *two* very interested (and more importantly,
interesting) companies.

I've been at my new job (in a new house, in a new city) for about six
weeks now. It's not perfect (nothing is), but I'm enjoying the job,
like the people I work with, and the area we live in. We made the right
choice. Go after what you really want, and you will too.
--
Benji York
Sr. Software Engineer
Zope Corporation
Jul 18 '05 #3

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.