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spelling errors in query terms

P: n/a
Hi,

I seem to recall once coming across & using functionality in PostgreSQL
that allowed for some flexibility in the spelling of a query term. For
example, if one meant to look for 'Honda', but typed in 'Zonda'. There
was even a 'looseness' factor of sorts available. I've spent a lot of
time trying to find it in the docs and various articles & tutorials on
my hard drive, even an hour on Google in vain. It was not
contrib/fuzzystrmatch.

Anyone know what I'm talking about ?

Cheers,
Joel


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Nov 12 '05 #1
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P: n/a
Hi Joel,

If your using java, and full text, fuzzy searching is an important part of
your app, you might want to check out Lucene. I evaluated it for a
project, and it was very good (the project was a fuzzy search of huge
pages of text).

http://jakarta.apache.org/lucene/docs/index.html
On Mon, 8 Dec 2003, Joel Rodrigues wrote:
Hi,

I seem to recall once coming across & using functionality in PostgreSQL
that allowed for some flexibility in the spelling of a query term. For
example, if one meant to look for 'Honda', but typed in 'Zonda'. There
was even a 'looseness' factor of sorts available. I've spent a lot of
time trying to find it in the docs and various articles & tutorials on
my hard drive, even an hour on Google in vain. It was not
contrib/fuzzystrmatch.

Anyone know what I'm talking about ?

Cheers,
Joel


__________________________________________________ ___________________
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Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Mon, 8 Dec 2003, Joel Rodrigues wrote:
Hi,

I seem to recall once coming across & using functionality in PostgreSQL
that allowed for some flexibility in the spelling of a query term. For
example, if one meant to look for 'Honda', but typed in 'Zonda'. There
was even a 'looseness' factor of sorts available. I've spent a lot of
time trying to find it in the docs and various articles & tutorials on
my hard drive, even an hour on Google in vain. It was not
contrib/fuzzystrmatch.
You might try http://www.sai.msu.su/~megera/postgres/gist/trgm/
which uses trigram.


Anyone know what I'm talking about ?

Cheers,
Joel


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Regards,
Oleg
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Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
Thanks Oleg, I'll take a look at it. Too bad there is no documentation.

Also, there's something wrong with 'trgm.tgz'. This is what happens if I
try to extract it's contents :

gzip: stdin is encrypted -- get newer version of gzip
tar: End of archive volume 1 reached
tar: Sorry, unable to determine archive format.
Cheers ! - Joel
On Monday, December 8, 2003, at 05:39 , Oleg Bartunov wrote:
On Mon, 8 Dec 2003, Joel Rodrigues wrote:
Hi,

I seem to recall once coming across & using functionality in PostgreSQL
that allowed for some flexibility in the spelling of a query term. For
example, if one meant to look for 'Honda', but typed in 'Zonda'. There
was even a 'looseness' factor of sorts available. I've spent a lot of
time trying to find it in the docs and various articles & tutorials on
my hard drive, even an hour on Google in vain. It was not
contrib/fuzzystrmatch.


You might try http://www.sai.msu.su/~megera/postgres/gist/trgm/
which uses trigram.


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Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
Thanks Oleg, I'll take a look at it. Too bad there is no documentation.

Also, there's something wrong with 'trgm.tgz'. This is what happens if I
try to extract it's contents :

gzip: stdin is encrypted -- get newer version of gzip
tar: End of archive volume 1 reached
tar: Sorry, unable to determine archive format.
Cheers ! - Joel
On Monday, December 8, 2003, at 05:39 , Oleg Bartunov wrote:
On Mon, 8 Dec 2003, Joel Rodrigues wrote:
Hi,

I seem to recall once coming across & using functionality in PostgreSQL
that allowed for some flexibility in the spelling of a query term. For
example, if one meant to look for 'Honda', but typed in 'Zonda'. There
was even a 'looseness' factor of sorts available. I've spent a lot of
time trying to find it in the docs and various articles & tutorials on
my hard drive, even an hour on Google in vain. It was not
contrib/fuzzystrmatch.


You might try http://www.sai.msu.su/~megera/postgres/gist/trgm/
which uses trigram.


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Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a
Thanks for the tip. However I use Python with psycopg to interface with
PostgreSQL, so unfortunately it's not an option.

It's really strange, I could swear I used a function within PostgreSQL
that could handle small spelling errors in the query term.

Cheers,
Joel

On Monday, December 8, 2003, at 11:34 , Craig O'Shannessy wrote:
Hi Joel,

If your using java, and full text, fuzzy searching is an important part
of
your app, you might want to check out Lucene. I evaluated it for a
project, and it was very good (the project was a fuzzy search of huge
pages of text).

http://jakarta.apache.org/lucene/docs/index.html


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Nov 12 '05 #6

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