By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
437,949 Members | 1,869 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 437,949 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Setting up my first database

P: n/a
Hello.

If I want to set up my first database and start using it in
Dreamweaver what do I need to do?

The book I'm working on has a CD with the database on. It is telling
me to put it in the MySql folder on drive C.

However, when I'm in Dreamweaver I click on Applications at the side,
and the plus button to add a MySql database. It tells me to enter the
following info:

Connection Name: conn_newland
MySQL Server: localhost
Usename: root
Password: leave password blank
Database: newland_tours

If I enter all this info and click to test it comes up with error 1049
unknown database. This makes me wonder whether I have put the
database in the correct folder? When I click on the select button
next to Database within these settings it only lists two databases:
test and mysql. The newland_tours.sql database that I put into the
MySql folder on drive C is not listed.

Am I doing something wrong do you know and should this be in another
folder?

Gracias

John

Win XP Pro / DW 7.0.1
Running locally: Apache 2.0.49 / PHP 4.3.7 / MySQL 4.0.20a
Jul 17 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
16 Replies


P: n/a
In message-id <b3********************************@4ax.com>,
John wrote:
If I want to set up my first database and start using it in
Dreamweaver what do I need to do?
first thing you need to do is to understand that dreamweaver has
nothing whatsoever to do with databases.
The book I'm working on has a CD with the database on. It is telling
me to put it in the MySql folder on drive C.
do you understand why it is telling you to do this?

if i wrote a book, supposedly about PHP programming, and told you that
the first thing you need to do is to open the Start menu, then click
on Run, then type 'cmd' , then type 'format c:' and answer 'yes' to
the prompt, would you do it because it said so in the book?

i'm not saying your book is wrong, it's just that from your line of
questioning i think that maybe you need to undestand a little bit more
about what you are trying to do before you actually do it.
However, when I'm in Dreamweaver I click on Applications at the side,
and the plus button to add a MySql database. It tells me to enter the
following info:

Connection Name: conn_newland
MySQL Server: localhost
Usename: root
Password: leave password blank
Database: newland_tours

If I enter all this info and click to test it comes up with error 1049
unknown database.

This makes me wonder whether I have put the
database in the correct folder?


i'm presuming that you're using Window$:

the default location for mysql databases on Window$ is
X:\[path-to-mysql]\data

so, if installed mysql to, for example, c:\program files\mysql, then
your data files will be in c:\program files\mysql\data

1. find out where your mysql installation lives (eg. :\program
files\mysql)

2. look in the 'data' sub-directory (eg. :\program files\mysql\data) -
you should see sub-directories called 'mysql' and 'test' - these are
the databases you can see via. dreamweaver.

3. copy your cd's data files here

re-start mysql (may not be necessary, not sure, won't hut to do it
anyway)

Jul 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 03:36:49 +0100, Herbie Cumberland
<sp******@skipraider.com> wrote:
In message-id <b3********************************@4ax.com>,
John wrote:
If I want to set up my first database and start using it in
Dreamweaver what do I need to do?
first thing you need to do is to understand that dreamweaver has
nothing whatsoever to do with databases.


I know, sorry. I am just using DW to work on the site and connect to
the database etc with php.
The book I'm working on has a CD with the database on. It is telling
me to put it in the MySql folder on drive C.


do you understand why it is telling you to do this?


Yes.
if i wrote a book, supposedly about PHP programming, and told you that
the first thing you need to do is to open the Start menu, then click
on Run, then type 'cmd' , then type 'format c:' and answer 'yes' to
the prompt, would you do it because it said so in the book?

i'm not saying your book is wrong, it's just that from your line of
questioning i think that maybe you need to undestand a little bit more
about what you are trying to do before you actually do it.
However, when I'm in Dreamweaver I click on Applications at the side,
and the plus button to add a MySql database. It tells me to enter the
following info:

Connection Name: conn_newland
MySQL Server: localhost
Usename: root
Password: leave password blank
Database: newland_tours

If I enter all this info and click to test it comes up with error 1049
unknown database.

This makes me wonder whether I have put the
database in the correct folder?
i'm presuming that you're using Window$:


Yes.
the default location for mysql databases on Window$ is
X:\[path-to-mysql]\data

so, if installed mysql to, for example, c:\program files\mysql, then
your data files will be in c:\program files\mysql\data

1. find out where your mysql installation lives (eg. :\program
files\mysql)

2. look in the 'data' sub-directory (eg. :\program files\mysql\data) -
you should see sub-directories called 'mysql' and 'test' - these are
the databases you can see via. dreamweaver.

3. copy your cd's data files here


I notice that there are two folders within the mysql\data folder names
test and mysql. I have put the newland_tours.sql file in this
mysql\data folder as well.

When I go back into Dreamweaver and click on the Applications,
Databases and the Plus sign to add a MySql connection, if I click the
button that says Select, to choose the database, only test and mysql
are listed.

John

Win XP Pro / DW 7.0.1
Running locally: Apache 2.0.49 / PHP 4.3.7 / MySQL 4.0.20a

Jul 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
Okay I have a couple of points to add to this this thread that might
actually be useful.

John wrote:
When I'm in Dreamweaver I click on Applications at the side,
and the plus button to add a MySql database. It tells me to enter the
following info:

Connection Name: conn_newland
MySQL Server: localhost
Usename: root
Password: leave password blank
Database: newland_tours

If I enter all this info and click to test it comes up with error 1049
unknown database.

The 'Database' argument in the above is telling Dreamweaver to select,
for this Dreamweaver 'Site', a particular database called newland_tours.
This would be the equivalent of the mysql_select_db('newland_tours')
statement in php.

The reason you are getting the 1049 unknown db error is that the
database has not been *created* yet. BTW you obviously haven't set a
password for the mysql root user account, or you would have received an
'unable to connect' error.
I notice that there are two folders within the mysql\data folder names
test and mysql. I have put the newland_tours.sql file in this
mysql\data folder as well.
'test' is a database. 'mysql' is the the database that contains all the
user accounts and permissions for mysql. Don't fuck with this unless you
really know what you are doing.

A .sql file is not a database. You cannot create and populate a database
by simply putting this file in that directory. In fact, you should *not*
be putting this file in that directory because that directory really
should contain *only* actual databases. Instead, you should put this
file in some other document directory, log on to the mysql client on
your local machine (the one running mysql), and *execute* the file.

A .sql file typically contains a set of SQL statements to do such things
as create a database, create the tables and relationships within the
database, and load the tables with data. Open this 'newland_tours.sql'
file in a text editor such as EditPlus or TextPad (both free, BTW, and
EditPlus is highly preferable because it also lets you ftp), and you
should see statements like these:

CREATE IF NOT EXISTS DATABASE newland_tours;
CREATE IF NOT EXISTS TABLE myTableName1;
CREATE IF NOT EXISTS TABLE myTableName2;
etc. etc. etc.

To actually *do* all of these things, you need to *execute* the .sql file.

I do not know exactly how to do this in M$, but on the UNIX side, it
would look like this:

1. Log on to a terminal session (command prompt).
2. Invoke the mysql client (in this case, asking for a password prompt):%mysql -p 3. On getting the password prompt, enter the password:%Password: 'mypasswordhere' 4. When successfully logged on, you get the mysql prompt:mysql 5. The >mysql prompt on the above line shows that I have logged on to
the mysql client successfully. On your machine, you would probably just
bring up a command prompt and invoke the mysql client as the root user,
and since you haven't set a password for the root user, you don't need a
password prompt, thus:

C:\Documents and Settings\bonehead>mysql -u root
C:>mysql

To execute the .sql file, I use the 'source' command. For example, if
the .sql file is located on my UNIX desktop, the command would be
mysql source /home/bonehead/Desktop/newland_tours.sql;


When I hit Enter, the file executes in the mysql default directory.

Again it would be slightly (but only slightly) different in Windoze.
Head out to your local Borders today and flip through all the PHP and
MySQL books and you'll probably find examples of what the prompts and
commands look like in M$.

First, look up these books on Amazon and then look for them when you go
to Borders (or Bookstar or whatever):

ISBN 0764543644 (flawed but the most accessible for very beginners)
ISBN 0764557440 (much better but not really for beginners)
ISBN 1861007213 (very good but not what you really need right now)
ISBN 067232525X (excellent as a reference)
--
'bonehead
--------------------------------------------------------
"I love Thanksgiving turkey. It's the only time
in L.A. that you get to see natural breasts"
Kaleefoahnia Ubergruppenfuhrer Ahhhhnold Schwarzenegger

Jul 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
>>>However, when I'm in Dreamweaver

whatever that is.
I click on Applications at the side,
and the plus button to add a MySql database. It tells me to enter the
following info:

Connection Name: conn_newland
MySQL Server: localhost
Usename: root
Password: leave password blank
Database: newland_tours
....I notice that there are two folders within the mysql\data folder names
test and mysql. I have put the newland_tours.sql file in this
mysql\data folder as well.
MySQL, at least on UNIX systems, uses one subdirectory for
each database with the same name as the database. If you had a
newland_tours database, it would show up as a subdirectory, and
if it had tables in it, they might (depending on table types in
use) show up as *.frm, *.MYI, and *.MYD files named after the
tables. Look in the 'mysql' subdirectory for some examples of this.

If you are given a *.sql file, it is likely a file of commands
which you are supposed to *RUN* using the mysql command-line
interface to create the database, set up the tables, and populate
them with test data.

In UNIX, this is typically done with

% mysql [additional arguments] < newland_tours.sql

OR

% mysql [additional arguments]
...... bunch of startup output ...
mysql> \. newland_tours.sql
..... bunch of results of commands or error messages ...
mysql> quit
%

(The \. command means "run this (text) file as a sequence of SQL commands").

Your invocation of the mysql command-line utility will almost
certainly require additional arguments to specify the host, user,
and password. For example:
% mysql -h localhost -u root -p'leave password blank'
I don't know whether it uses / or - for switches on Windows. I
don't know whether this can be done at all without using the keyboard.
If you really leave the password blank (not a good idea in general,
probably OK as long as you only have a demo database, but you might
later find you have a huge database of porn being heavily used by
outside users), leave off the -p flag.

DON'T specify newland_tours as the database; it doesn't exist yet.
If the "create database newland_tours" command doesn't appear near
the start of newland_tours.sql, you may have to create it yourself
(Type "create database newland_tours;" at the mysql> prompt, then
run the newland_tours.sql file.

How much of this works in Windows, I don't know. I don't know
how to enter SQL in mouse only. Examining newland_tours.sql
as a text file might give you some idea of what it's doing.
You do know a little about SQL, don't you? You should at least
recognize CREATE TABLE and INSERT commands.
When I go back into Dreamweaver and click on the Applications,
Databases and the Plus sign to add a MySql connection, if I click the
button that says Select, to choose the database, only test and mysql
are listed.


Gordon L. Burditt
Jul 17 '05 #5

P: n/a
>In message-id <b3********************************@4ax.com>,
John wrote:

If I want to set up my first database and start using it in
Dreamweaver what do I need to do?


I realise this isn't the thrust of your question, but can I suggest
that you take Dreamweaver completely out of the equation? I.e., use a
straight text editor instead?

The reason I suggest that is because Dreamweaver, being a poorly
designed editor, will complicate your life more than simplify it.

It's the scientific principle: reduce sources of error as completely
as possible. Unless you know--at least on a solid conceptual
level--what each tool is doing 'under the table', you're necessarily
operating by magic: you do A, and B happens. But if B doesn't
happen, you're stuck--you don't really know why B didn't happen, or
how to approach solving the problem.

So use the most basic tools possible til you get a grip on what's
going on. Add another tool only after you learn how to make the
earlier tools do what you want them to whenever you want them to do
it. Believe me, even well-designed tools have enough craziness in
them to keep you busy. Errare humanum est.

Good luck.

Margaret

--
(To mail me, please change .not.invalid to .net, first.
Apologies for the inconvenience.)
Jul 17 '05 #6

P: n/a
John <ph*************@needshelp.com> wrote in message news:<ka********************************@4ax.com>. ..
I notice that there are two folders within the mysql\data folder names
test and mysql. I have put the newland_tours.sql file in this
mysql\data folder as well.
Hi John,
This is probably not the best way to create your files - .sql files
are usually an SQL script, not a database file and I'm assuming this
is true. Like Herbie says, you should understand what you are doing,
rather than following instructions blindly. I would urge you to have
a look at the manual.

The .sql script may well create the database for you, but as I don't
have it in front of me, I can only guess that it doesn't.

Ideally start at the beginning, or you could jump to the relevant
pages here:
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/mysql/en/Cr..._database.html will tell
you how to create your database

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/mysql/en/Batch_mode.html will tell you how to
run the script

When I go back into Dreamweaver


I have no experience of Dreamweaver, so I can't answer this part for
you.

Regards,

Andy
Jul 17 '05 #7

P: n/a
On Sun, 20 Jun 2004 11:29:45 -0700, bonehead <se**********@here.net>
wrote:
Okay I have a couple of points to add to this this thread that might
actually be useful.

John wrote:
When I'm in Dreamweaver I click on Applications at the side,
and the plus button to add a MySql database. It tells me to enter the
following info:

Connection Name: conn_newland
MySQL Server: localhost
Usename: root
Password: leave password blank
Database: newland_tours

If I enter all this info and click to test it comes up with error 1049
unknown database.

The 'Database' argument in the above is telling Dreamweaver to select,
for this Dreamweaver 'Site', a particular database called newland_tours.
This would be the equivalent of the mysql_select_db('newland_tours')
statement in php.

The reason you are getting the 1049 unknown db error is that the
database has not been *created* yet. BTW you obviously haven't set a
password for the mysql root user account, or you would have received an
'unable to connect' error.
I notice that there are two folders within the mysql\data folder names
test and mysql. I have put the newland_tours.sql file in this
mysql\data folder as well.


'test' is a database. 'mysql' is the the database that contains all the
user accounts and permissions for mysql. Don't fuck with this unless you
really know what you are doing.

A .sql file is not a database. You cannot create and populate a database
by simply putting this file in that directory. In fact, you should *not*
be putting this file in that directory because that directory really
should contain *only* actual databases. Instead, you should put this
file in some other document directory, log on to the mysql client on
your local machine (the one running mysql), and *execute* the file.

A .sql file typically contains a set of SQL statements to do such things
as create a database, create the tables and relationships within the
database, and load the tables with data. Open this 'newland_tours.sql'
file in a text editor such as EditPlus or TextPad (both free, BTW, and
EditPlus is highly preferable because it also lets you ftp), and you
should see statements like these:

CREATE IF NOT EXISTS DATABASE newland_tours;
CREATE IF NOT EXISTS TABLE myTableName1;
CREATE IF NOT EXISTS TABLE myTableName2;
etc. etc. etc.


Yes there's stuff like that in the file.
To actually *do* all of these things, you need to *execute* the .sql file.

I do not know exactly how to do this in M$, but on the UNIX side, it
would look like this:

1. Log on to a terminal session (command prompt).
2. Invoke the mysql client (in this case, asking for a password prompt):
>%mysql -p3. On getting the password prompt, enter the password:
>%Password: 'mypasswordhere'

4. When successfully logged on, you get the mysql prompt:
>mysql

5. The >mysql prompt on the above line shows that I have logged on to
the mysql client successfully. On your machine, you would probably just
bring up a command prompt and invoke the mysql client as the root user,
and since you haven't set a password for the root user, you don't need a
password prompt, thus:


I can get to the mysql client as root user without a password. A
username and password is listed in the my.ini file however.
C:\Documents and Settings\bonehead>mysql -u root
C:>mysql

To execute the .sql file, I use the 'source' command. For example, if
the .sql file is located on my UNIX desktop, the command would be
>mysql source /home/bonehead/Desktop/newland_tours.sql;


When I hit Enter, the file executes in the mysql default directory.


I'm with you so far but when I hit enter I get a lot of error
messages.

At the mysql prompt I am typing:

source c:\mysql\newland_tours.sql

The first two error messages I get say:

Error 1044: Access denied for user: '@localhost' to database
'newland_tours'

followed by about 30 or so saying:

Error 1046 No database selected.

John

Jul 17 '05 #8

P: n/a
On 20 Jun 2004 11:58:09 -0700, ab**********@yahoo.com (Andy Barfield)
wrote:
John <ph*************@needshelp.com> wrote in message news:<ka********************************@4ax.com>. ..
I notice that there are two folders within the mysql\data folder names
test and mysql. I have put the newland_tours.sql file in this
mysql\data folder as well.


Hi John,
This is probably not the best way to create your files - .sql files
are usually an SQL script, not a database file and I'm assuming this
is true. Like Herbie says, you should understand what you are doing,
rather than following instructions blindly. I would urge you to have
a look at the manual.

The .sql script may well create the database for you, but as I don't
have it in front of me, I can only guess that it doesn't.

Ideally start at the beginning, or you could jump to the relevant
pages here:
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/mysql/en/Cr..._database.html will tell
you how to create your database

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/mysql/en/Batch_mode.html will tell you how to
run the script

When I go back into Dreamweaver


I have no experience of Dreamweaver, so I can't answer this part for
you.

Regards,

Andy


I think the problem is that I get access denied so it must be some
sort of user problem? I have been to the dev.mysql.com site before
and it didn't really help me. I think it is geared more towards
advanced users and it's not easy to find what you need. I will take a
look again though.

John
Jul 17 '05 #9

P: n/a
I noticed that Message-ID: <f2********************************@4ax.com>
from John contained the following:
I think the problem is that I get access denied so it must be some
sort of user problem? I have been to the dev.mysql.com site before
and it didn't really help me. I think it is geared more towards
advanced users and it's not easy to find what you need. I will take a
look again though.

I've found that the easiest way round this is to use the firepages
www.firepages.com.au install of php, apache, mysql etc etc You get
phpmyadmin which allows you to paste the contents of an .sql file into a
text box. Hit the go button and the tables are created. It really is
dead easy.

But I'd also go along with what Margaret says. Dreamweaver is a great
tool but I only got databases to work by going back to basics.

Do some basic PHP and then as many tutorials as you can. If you have
some PHP enabled webspace, use that for testing until you get more
confident. It worked for me.
--
Geoff Berrow (put thecat out to email)
It's only Usenet, no one dies.
My opinions, not the committee's, mine.
Simple RFDs http://www.ckdog.co.uk/rfdmaker/
Jul 17 '05 #10

P: n/a
John wrote:
I'm with you so far but when I hit enter I get a lot of error
messages.

At the mysql prompt I am typing:

source c:\mysql\newland_tours.sql

The first two error messages I get say:

Error 1044: Access denied for user: '@localhost' to database
'newland_tours'

followed by about 30 or so saying:

Error 1046 No database selected.


Okay there's a couple of ways to troubleshoot this. On the face of it,
it sounds like you need to make modifications to the permissions for the
mysql root user.

In any event, another, actually easier approach, if you just want to get
the damn thing done so you can move on, (and you might just want to do
this anyway, so you can see each line execute) is to open the .sql file
in a text editor, then bring up a command prompt, log on to the mysql
client as before, go back to the .sql file and copy and paste ONE
*COMPLETE* command AT A TIME into the command window and hit Enter just
to see each individual command execute. Each complete command is
terminated with a semicolon. In fact, if you don't have much background
in MySQL you probably should just do it that way anyhow so you can see
how it works.

If the first statement (CREATE IF NOT EXISTS DATABASE...) doesn't
execute and throws an error, that's an indication that the permissions
for the root account in mysql need to be modified. That's beyond the
scope of what I can explain to you on the usenet, and you'll need to get
a book. See the first and last of the four ISBNs I recommended
previously for good examples of how to do this.

Jul 17 '05 #11

P: n/a
'bonehead wrote:
If the first statement (CREATE IF NOT EXISTS DATABASE...) doesn't
execute and throws an error, that's an indication that the permissions
for the root account in mysql need to be modified. That's beyond the
scope of what I can explain to you on the usenet, and you'll need to get
a book. See the first and last of the four ISBNs I recommended
previously for good examples of how to do this.


And BTW, the other posters in this thread are right: eventually you need
to stop relying on Dreamweaver because you'll come to use it as a
crutch, which you nearly are doing already.

Don't get me wrong, I really like DW, it's the quickest, easiest tool
for WYSIWYG web page design, hands down, and I've found it to be really
helpful when I need to slap stuff together real fast. But one of the
great things about php is that you can turn it on and off within the
same script, so you can go back and forth between html and php. Plus
it's much easier to write debug blocks so you can make sure your
database code is executing correctly. Plus a whole bunch of other
advantages that I really don't have time to go into here.

I recently finished the first version of a web database survey system.
Without going into a lot of detail, the system includes three generic
subforms, two of which contain 240 fields (!!!) don't ask me why, that's
what the users wanted so I just did it. Anyway, the fields on the
subforms had to be organized into specific groups, and the *only* thing
I used DW for was to design the layout of those subforms so the users
could see what they would look like.

When I knew that I finally finally finally had it the way the users
wanted it, I just pasted the php variables into the html, and then
copied and pasted the whole thing into the appropriate sections of my
php script and wrapped them in heredoc tags. Once you've done it that
way, you'll never go back. Good luck and keep bangin away, you'll get it...

Jul 17 '05 #12

P: n/a
>Okay there's a couple of ways to troubleshoot this. On the face of it,
it sounds like you need to make modifications to the permissions for the
mysql root user.

In any event, another, actually easier approach, if you just want to get
the damn thing done so you can move on, (and you might just want to do
this anyway, so you can see each line execute) is to open the .sql file
in a text editor, then bring up a command prompt, log on to the mysql
client as before, go back to the .sql file and copy and paste ONE
*COMPLETE* command AT A TIME into the command window and hit Enter just
to see each individual command execute. Each complete command is
terminated with a semicolon. In fact, if you don't have much background
in MySQL you probably should just do it that way anyhow so you can see
how it works.

If the first statement (CREATE IF NOT EXISTS DATABASE...) doesn't
execute and throws an error, that's an indication that the permissions
for the root account in mysql need to be modified. That's beyond the
scope of what I can explain to you on the usenet, and you'll need to get
a book. See the first and last of the four ISBNs I recommended
previously for good examples of how to do this.


It wont let me copy and paste each line from the file in Windows to
the command prompt in Dos. It just enter an upside down v and the
letter V when I try and Ctrl + V.

In any case, if I type each line individually it gives error messages
saying access denied, so it looks like it is the permissions?

John
Jul 17 '05 #13

P: n/a
On Sun, 20 Jun 2004 19:22:46 -0700, 'bonehead <se*********@here.org>
wrote:
'bonehead wrote:
If the first statement (CREATE IF NOT EXISTS DATABASE...) doesn't
execute and throws an error, that's an indication that the permissions
for the root account in mysql need to be modified. That's beyond the
scope of what I can explain to you on the usenet, and you'll need to get
a book. See the first and last of the four ISBNs I recommended
previously for good examples of how to do this.
And BTW, the other posters in this thread are right: eventually you need
to stop relying on Dreamweaver because you'll come to use it as a
crutch, which you nearly are doing already.


I've hardly used it at all yet, mainly because I haven't been able to
get MySQL up and running.

I like DW because you can work in split view and see your code and
design at the same time. Seeing the code on screen in DW is like
being in just a basic notepad except you can also see the design too,
and have a lot of powerful features at your disposal.

I am not relying on Dreamweaver, I can see code as well in DW, anyway
I haven't really used it yet. Previously I was relying on FrontPage
which produces garbage code, this is much better because you have full
visibility in both code and design.
Don't get me wrong, I really like DW, it's the quickest, easiest tool
for WYSIWYG web page design, hands down, and I've found it to be really
helpful when I need to slap stuff together real fast. But one of the
great things about php is that you can turn it on and off within the
same script, so you can go back and forth between html and php. Plus
it's much easier to write debug blocks so you can make sure your
database code is executing correctly. Plus a whole bunch of other
advantages that I really don't have time to go into here.


I don't have a problem with the PHP part which I have just recently
begun learning. It's just getting MySQL going which is the problem.

John
Jul 17 '05 #14

P: n/a
On Sun, 20 Jun 2004 18:49:08 GMT, Margaret MacDonald
<sc**********@att.not.invalid> wrote:
In message-id <b3********************************@4ax.com>,
John wrote:

If I want to set up my first database and start using it in
Dreamweaver what do I need to do?
I realise this isn't the thrust of your question, but can I suggest
that you take Dreamweaver completely out of the equation? I.e., use a
straight text editor instead?


I'm not using it yet because I haven't got MySQL up and running which
is the problem I have. Anyway, Dreamweaver is pretty much a text
editor when you can see all the code on screen.
The reason I suggest that is because Dreamweaver, being a poorly
designed editor, will complicate your life more than simplify it.
It's simplified it a heck of a lot since previously using FrontPage.
You can't do a sitewide code modification of all bad code using a text
editor but in Dreamweaver you can get rid of all the bad code at the
touch of a button using find and replace, and for the entire site,
possibly thousands of pages all in one go.
It's the scientific principle: reduce sources of error as completely
as possible. Unless you know--at least on a solid conceptual
level--what each tool is doing 'under the table', you're necessarily
operating by magic: you do A, and B happens. But if B doesn't
happen, you're stuck--you don't really know why B didn't happen, or
how to approach solving the problem.

So use the most basic tools possible til you get a grip on what's
going on. Add another tool only after you learn how to make the
earlier tools do what you want them to whenever you want them to do
it. Believe me, even well-designed tools have enough craziness in
them to keep you busy. Errare humanum est.
I don't have a problem with the html or php, it is just getting MySQL
working that I am having the trouble with :(
Good luck.


Thanks

John
Jul 17 '05 #15

P: n/a
I noticed that Message-ID: <np********************************@4ax.com>
from John contained the following:
I don't have a problem with the html or php, it is just getting MySQL
working that I am having the trouble with :(


I use Dreamweaver.

Trust me, the firepages install is really easy.

--
Geoff Berrow (put thecat out to email)
It's only Usenet, no one dies.
My opinions, not the committee's, mine.
Simple RFDs http://www.ckdog.co.uk/rfdmaker/
Jul 17 '05 #16

P: n/a
John wrote:
I don't have a problem with the html or php, it is just getting MySQL
working that I am having the trouble with :(


What state is it in, exactly? Is it installed? If not, what does it
complain about when you try to install it? If it seems to be
installed, can you see the daemon running in the process list? If the
daemon isn't there, can you start it by hand? Once started, can you
use the mysql console to do things? If you can't, what seems to be
the problem?

Margaret
--
(To mail me, please change .not.invalid to .net, first.
Apologies for the inconvenience.)
Jul 17 '05 #17

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.