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What's a Good Book for Beginners?

P: n/a
Hello Everyone,
I just purchased Visual Studio .Net Architect 2003 and want to know what's a
good book for begginers to start with. I know nothing about programming
whatsoever, but I do have a desire to learn- as obvious with this purchase.

So please let me know where I can start and thanks. Also, what newsgroup
should I post my queries to?
Jul 21 '05 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
I would suggest you learn C# instead of VB.NET if you are going to be a web
developer. Web development requires a mastery of JavaScript for the
client-side processes that occur in the browser once the page has been
generated on the server and returned to the server. Both C# and JavaScript
are nearly identical syntax and grammar. Learn one and you learn the other.

Start with a textbook to learn the language. There are many good books
around you will eventually hear about but the best books to learn a language
are textbooks. You get textbooks from Deitel & Deitel [1] which can be
ordered or found on the shelves at a Barnes & Noble where you can evaluate
before buying. You should also get into a local college or university
bookstore to see what texts they are using for language instruction. Stay
away from technical schools that only provide two year degree programs as
their 'textbooks' are selected by moron homos that sit on committees (voice
of experience) and their selections are always garbage consumer sh!t that
has always amazed me how the stuff even gets published when it would be much
more valuable as toilet paper.

Amongst many other books, I have "C# A Programmer's Introduction" which
Deitel apparently does not sell anymore. Look for it on Amazon or select one
of the other textbooks from Deitel. They all use 'some' of the framework
during the language lessons but the focus is instructional material focused
on teaching the language not the framework which should be your first
objective.

Once you get through the Deitel book buy QUE Training Guides 70-315 and
70-320 that prepare candidates for the MCAD certification. Even if you are
not intending to become certified the QUE books expose you to excercises and
lessons covering each and every aspect of using the .NET Framework to
develop and deploy ASP.NET applications.

You'll also dop well by purchsing the "C# Class Design Handbook" published
by WROX and you will have as good a foundation as any.

On the other hand, Microsoft is dumbing down VB.NET claiming 70% less code
will have to be written when using ASP.NET 2.0. I've seen proof of this
claim and it is for the most part correct. If you want to learn to be a
dummy then by all means start by learning VB.NET as it will dumb you down if
you do not get a solid foundation of what is going on behind the scenes,
under the covers, up down and around the sides of the syntax and grammar of
VB which is so verbose you will always struggle with JavaScript which like
C# is derived from C and is compact and elegant using only classic software
engineering syntax and grammar. You will also be able to read and understand
Java and when Microsoft achieves its goals to burned the last person on the
face of the earth you could then reuse your C# skills once again by learning
the J2EE framework.

AFIK there really aren't any good books about Visual Studio.NET and I've
looked high and low so you'll have to pick stuff up here and there. Just be
advised Visual Studio.NET is FUBAR when it comes to webpage design and
layout so most people who are not sadistic masochists learn to use FrontPage
or Dreamweaver with Visual Studio.NET noting that approach still has a bunch
of problems unique to the hell Microsoft puts customers through when they
sell dog sh!t and call it a dozen roses.

I've taught in classrooms and I am a perpetual student myself. I don't think
you'll go wrong with my advice noting there is still much to hear and learn
from others. Choose any of the newsgroups to ask questions but try to stay
on topic and try to think clearly crafting a well stated question before
posting which is the best way to get results. Good luck to you and welcome
to the misery loves company club ;-)

--
<%= Clinton Gallagher
METROmilwaukee "Regional Information Services"
NET csgallagher AT metromilwaukee.com
URL http://clintongallagher.metromilwaukee.com/

[1] http://www.deitel.com/

"tada991" <ta*****@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:CB**********************************@microsof t.com...
Hello Everyone,
I just purchased Visual Studio .Net Architect 2003 and want to know what's a good book for begginers to start with. I know nothing about programming
whatsoever, but I do have a desire to learn- as obvious with this purchase.
So please let me know where I can start and thanks. Also, what newsgroup
should I post my queries to?

Jul 21 '05 #2

P: n/a
Tada,

http://samples.gotdotnet.com/quickstart/

And for all that Clinton write, the only thing for me is that I find the IDE
from VBNet better for the rest it is all the same. The classes used in
dotNet programs are all the same and those are the most important, only the
glue to connect those are a little bit different when using VBNet or C#.

I hope this helps?

Cor
Jul 21 '05 #3

P: n/a
"tada991" <ta*****@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
Hello Everyone,
I just purchased Visual Studio .Net Architect 2003 and want to know what's a
good book for begginers to start with. I know nothing about programming
whatsoever, but I do have a desire to learn- as obvious with this purchase.

Desire and commitment is good could but have coasted on the
SDK (download or CD) plus some open source components such
as SharpDevelop and WebMatrix or even the VS2005 Express
beta before committing to that kind of level.

As you have no programming background whatsoever you should
be probably looking at something like:

Programming in the Key of C#
by Charles Petzold
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0735618003
http://www.microsoft.com/MSPress/books/6261.asp

Learn to Program with C#
by John Smiley
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0072222611
http://authors.aspalliance.com/aspxt...sin=0072222611


So please let me know where I can start and thanks. Also, what newsgroup
should I post my queries to?


'Any fool can write code that a computer can understand.
Good programmers write code that humans can understand.'
Martin Fowler,
'Refactoring: improving the design of existing code', p.15
Jul 21 '05 #4

P: n/a
"clintonG" <cs*********@REMOVETHISTEXTmetromilwaukee.com>
wrote:

<snip>

Once you get through the Deitel book buy QUE Training Guides 70-315 and
70-320 that prepare candidates for the MCAD certification. Even if you are
not intending to become certified the QUE books expose you to excercises and
lessons covering each and every aspect of using the .NET Framework to
develop and deploy ASP.NET applications.

While this is certainly a viable approach it will tend to
bore beginners to tears as these guides cover a very wide
breadth of topics while not really covering anything in that
much depth - only very few people would put up with this
without the goal of certification.

IMO

Programming C#
By Jesse Liberty
3rd Edition May 2003
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...575552-7205660
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/progcsharp3/index.html
4th Edition February 2005 (est.)
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/progcsharp4/index.html
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596006993

would make a better second book as it whets your appetite
for all the different aspects of .NET (ADO.NET, ASP.NET,
Windows Forms, Web services, InterOp).

Then as the next book I would recommend

Microsoft ADO.NET (Core Reference)
by David Sceppa
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0735614237

however here we are a bit in a quandary. Somebody who has no
programming experience will likely not have any experience
with databases. How to you understand ADO.NET without a
background in databases? Something like

Databases Demystified
by Andrew Oppel
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...l/-/0072253649

may help - but the rate at which the proper database terms
appear may still be a bit daunting for a beginner. Then of
course that still doesn't take care of the fiddling you'll
have to do with the MSDE or SQL Server when experimenting
with ADO.NET.

Then you simply pursue the areas in order of interest
(Windows Forms, ASP.NET, Web services)

IMO Windows Forms is easiest to get into as you don't need
to fiddle with the configuration of IIS.
And that's just the .NET technology side of things. Somebody
who wants to program also needs to learn about unit testing
....

Pragmatic Unit Testing in C# with NUnit
by Andy Hunt, Dave Thomas
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0974514020
http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/s...utc/index.html
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/0974514020/

Test-Driven Development in Microsoft .NET (Microsoft
Professional)
by James W. Newkirk, Alexei A. Vorontsov
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0735619484
http://www.microsoft.com/MSPress/books/6778.asp
.... and version control ...

Pragmatic Version Control Using Subversion
by Mike Mason
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0974514063
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/0974514063/index.html

Version Control with Subversion
By Ben Collins-Sussman, Brian W. Fitzpatrick, C. Michael
Pilato
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/0596004486/index.html
http://svnbook.red-bean.com/

....(I was never fond of Visual Source Safe and people keep
reporting corruption problems). If you are concerned about
"good programming" (which you should be) you'd better get
....

Code Complete, Second Edition
by Steve McConnell
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0735619670
http://www.microsoft.com/MSPress/books/6822.asp

.... under your belt and adopt some good habits:

The Pragmatic Programmer: From Journeyman to Master
By Andrew Hunt, David Thomas.
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/020161622X
http://www.awprofessional.com/title/020161622X
http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/ppbook/index.shtml


You'll also do well by purchsing the "C# Class Design Handbook" published
by WROX and you will have as good a foundation as any.

<snip>

As Wrox no longer exists that book is now published by
Apress.
http://www.apress.com/book/bookDisplay.html?bID=270

Other Wrox titles have found a home with Wiley
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/index.html
retaining their original cover.

However

Programming .NET Components
By Juval Lwy
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596003471
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/pnetcomp/index.html

2nd Edition for .NET 2.0 April 2005 (est.)
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596007620
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/pnetcomp2/index.html

is IMO a superior value to the "C# Class Design Handbook" in
terms of both your time and money.
'Any fool can write code that a computer can understand.
Good programmers write code that humans can understand.'
Martin Fowler,
'Refactoring: improving the design of existing code', p.15
Jul 21 '05 #5

P: n/a
It looks like I have my work cut out for me.
Thanks to everyone for your suggestions.
Damonj

"UAError" wrote:
"tada991" <ta*****@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
Hello Everyone,
I just purchased Visual Studio .Net Architect 2003 and want to know what's a
good book for begginers to start with. I know nothing about programming
whatsoever, but I do have a desire to learn- as obvious with this purchase.


Desire and commitment is good could but have coasted on the
SDK (download or CD) plus some open source components such
as SharpDevelop and WebMatrix or even the VS2005 Express
beta before committing to that kind of level.

As you have no programming background whatsoever you should
be probably looking at something like:

Programming in the Key of C#
by Charles Petzold
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0735618003
http://www.microsoft.com/MSPress/books/6261.asp

Learn to Program with C#
by John Smiley
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0072222611
http://authors.aspalliance.com/aspxt...sin=0072222611


So please let me know where I can start and thanks. Also, what newsgroup
should I post my queries to?


'Any fool can write code that a computer can understand.
Good programmers write code that humans can understand.'
Martin Fowler,
'Refactoring: improving the design of existing code', p.15

Jul 21 '05 #6

P: n/a
I found that I quite enjoyed a book called:

C# programming for the absolute beginner
by andy harris

premier press

It states that no experience programing is needed. It also gets the reader
to program small games so they stay interested in the process. All in all I
found it a good start and very approachable.

Pete

heres a link
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...1108356500/sr=
8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/102-4945385-5614554?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

Jul 21 '05 #7

P: n/a
microsoft press book......but wait until visual basic 2005 release then
buy book for 2005

tada991 wrote:
Hello Everyone,
I just purchased Visual Studio .Net Architect 2003 and want to know what's a
good book for begginers to start with. I know nothing about programming
whatsoever, but I do have a desire to learn- as obvious with this purchase.

So please let me know where I can start and thanks. Also, what newsgroup
should I post my queries to?


Jul 21 '05 #8

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