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Best java development tool

P: n/a
Hi,

I'm new in java and my customer want an application which works under
LINUX and WINDOWS plat forms.

So, i though logically in JAVA.

As i need to select my development tool, i would like to choose the
right one and not to throw money by windows...

- My application needs to works under WIndows XP (and developped un
it), Windows 2003 std, and LINUX (distribution is unknown for now)

- application must collect/write data to Microsoft SQL server
database.

- Must use a lot of stream video, images, TCP/IP and text file.

As i use to work with Borland, I though about JBuilderX entreprise but
some other tools exist like : Eclipse project or sun java studio 5.
I would like to have your programmer's feedback about development
tools that you use for Java and their default and qualities.

This will help me a lot.
thanks in advance,

Maileen
Jul 17 '05 #1
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10 Replies


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"jAnO!" <j.*****@donotspam.kpn.com> wrote in message
news:c1**********@hdxl22.telecom.ptt.nl...

"pmdanger" <pm******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:a0**************************@posting.google.c om...
I would like to have your programmer's feedback about development
tools that you use for Java and their default and qualities.

This will help me a lot.
thanks in advance,

Maileen
I like Intellij: www.idea.com


correction:
www.intellij.com

Jul 17 '05 #2

P: n/a

"pmdanger" <pm******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:a0**************************@posting.google.c om...
I would like to have your programmer's feedback about development
tools that you use for Java and their default and qualities.

This will help me a lot.
thanks in advance,

Maileen


I like Intellij: www.idea.com

Jul 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 12:03:44 +0100, jAnO! wrote:

"jAnO!" <j.*****@donotspam.kpn.com> wrote in message
news:c1**********@hdxl22.telecom.ptt.nl...

"pmdanger" <pm******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:a0**************************@posting.google.c om...
> I would like to have your programmer's feedback about development
> tools that you use for Java and their default and qualities.
>
> This will help me a lot.
> thanks in advance,
>
> Maileen


I like Intellij: www.idea.com


correction:
www.intellij.com

Most of the time I use JEdit. A good basic IDE with lots of plug-ins for
extra features. Because it runs in Java, then it is OS independent.

I've tried Sun's NetBeans, which seems fine, but the project centric
approach can be a pain. Like JEdit, use any version of Java and add extra
APIs without problems.

I've used JBuilder foundation under Windows. Never again! You get stuck
with the provided version of Java, adding extra APIs is a pain and, in my
case at least, it trashed working Java systems and would not compile/run
code known to be correct as a result. I could no longer even do it from
the command line as it had changed defaults in the registry.

I've not tried Eclipse, though it's supposed to be good.

Tony

Jul 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
pm******@yahoo.com (pmdanger) wrote in message news:<a0**************************@posting.google. com>...
As i use to work with Borland, I though about JBuilderX entreprise but
some other tools exist like : Eclipse project or sun java studio 5.
I would like to have your programmer's feedback about development
tools that you use for Java and their default and qualities.


I've never used Eclipse, but I've heard good things about it, and it
seems to be popular. I probably would be using it if I had known about
it a year ago, when my boss asked me to evaluate Java IDEs and pick
one to purchase and use. But since I didn't, I went with Borland
JBuilder.

JBuilder is excellent, and if cost is an issue, I believe that they
have a "personal edition" which is free. Of course it doesn't have all
the bells and whistles of the other editions, so you should check out
the feature matrix to see which edition has what you need.
(http://www.borland.com/jbuilder/pdf/jbx_feamatrix.pdf)

I would recommend that you stay away from Sun ONE Studio/NetBeans.
I've wrestled with it once or twice, and I find it to be quite klunky
and unintuitive, even for experienced Java developers. It's just not a
very well designed product from a UI/usability standpoint, IMHO.
Jul 17 '05 #5

P: n/a
In my opinion, go with Eclipse:
http://www.eclipse.org

It's well supported, many plugins are available, nice framework for
extending it. It's free, fast, written entirely in Java (read:
cross-platform), and quite nice for large or small projects.

It also has nice refactoring, formatting, and other nice-to-have's
that will make your life easier.

Michael Scovetta

pm******@yahoo.com (pmdanger) wrote in message news:<a0**************************@posting.google. com>...
Hi,

I'm new in java and my customer want an application which works under
LINUX and WINDOWS plat forms.

So, i though logically in JAVA.

As i need to select my development tool, i would like to choose the
right one and not to throw money by windows...

- My application needs to works under WIndows XP (and developped un
it), Windows 2003 std, and LINUX (distribution is unknown for now)

- application must collect/write data to Microsoft SQL server
database.

- Must use a lot of stream video, images, TCP/IP and text file.

As i use to work with Borland, I though about JBuilderX entreprise but
some other tools exist like : Eclipse project or sun java studio 5.
I would like to have your programmer's feedback about development
tools that you use for Java and their default and qualities.

This will help me a lot.
thanks in advance,

Maileen

Jul 17 '05 #6

P: n/a
I have worked in previous project NetBeans on both LINUX and Windows 2000.

NetBeans works fine on both Env.

Remember NetBeans is built purely on JAVA
It is free...

www.netbeans.org
Jul 17 '05 #7

P: n/a
Tony Burrows <to**@tonyburrows.com> wrote in message news:<pa****************************@tonyburrows.c om>...
On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 12:03:44 +0100, jAnO! wrote:

"jAnO!" <j.*****@donotspam.kpn.com> wrote in message
news:c1**********@hdxl22.telecom.ptt.nl...

"pmdanger" <pm******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:a0**************************@posting.google.c om...

> I would like to have your programmer's feedback about development
> tools that you use for Java and their default and qualities.
>
> This will help me a lot.
> thanks in advance,
>
> Maileen

I like Intellij: www.idea.com

correction:
www.intellij.com

Most of the time I use JEdit. A good basic IDE with lots of plug-ins for
extra features. Because it runs in Java, then it is OS independent.

I've tried Sun's NetBeans, which seems fine, but the project centric
approach can be a pain. Like JEdit, use any version of Java and add extra
APIs without problems.

I've used JBuilder foundation under Windows. Never again! You get stuck
with the provided version of Java


Not true. You can set up the system to recognize any number of JDKs
and painlessly switch between them. I never use the JDK that JBuilder
is shipped with and runs on top of.
adding extra APIs is a pain
I find it quite painless myself.
and, in my case at least, it trashed working Java systems and would not
compile/run code known to be correct as a result. I could no longer even do
it from the command line as it had changed defaults in the registry.


Never heard of a problem like this. I've used JBuilder from version 2
to X (10) on Windows without incident, and versions 8 - X on Linux,
also without incident.

Powerful and free is a hard combination to beat!

Greg
Jul 17 '05 #8

P: n/a
"Gregory A. Swarthout" wrote:
Tony Burrows wrote:
I've used JBuilder foundation under Windows. Never again! You get stuck with the provided version of Java


Not true. You can set up the system to recognize any number of JDKs
and painlessly switch between them. I never use the JDK that JBuilder
is shipped with and runs on top of.


JBuilder Foundation (the free version) only supports one version of the JDK
(at least last time I tried it - about JBuilder 6 Foundation I think).

There was some simple method to make it use a different JDK but it would
only support one JDK at a time (which is not really much of a problem).
Jul 17 '05 #9

P: n/a
bangalore buddha wrote:
I have worked in previous project NetBeans on both LINUX and Windows 2000.

NetBeans works fine on both Env.

Remember NetBeans is built purely on JAVA
It is free...

www.netbeans.org


It's amazing. I've used the same ZIP file to install net beans on
Windows and on two different distros of linux. Sometimes I forget under
what OS I work!

Jul 17 '05 #10

P: n/a
"Tom N" <to*@nospam.au> wrote in message news:<Gb******************@news-server.bigpond.net.au>...
"Gregory A. Swarthout" wrote:
Tony Burrows wrote:
I've used JBuilder foundation under Windows. Never again! You get stuck with the provided version of Java


Not true. You can set up the system to recognize any number of JDKs
and painlessly switch between them. I never use the JDK that JBuilder
is shipped with and runs on top of.


JBuilder Foundation (the free version) only supports one version of the JDK
(at least last time I tried it - about JBuilder 6 Foundation I think).

There was some simple method to make it use a different JDK but it would
only support one JDK at a time (which is not really much of a problem).


Not that way any more. Supports unlimited JDKs now.

Greg
Jul 17 '05 #11

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