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why installing jdk sometimes ask for reboot and sometimes not?

P: n/a
Hi all,
I just want to know why when I'm installing jdk sometimes ask me to
reboot and sometimes he don't. As part of our installation, we launch
the jdk installation if it's not already installed, so it's important
to know when the user will be asked to reboot.

Thanks
Jul 17 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
Stephane Dalpe wrote:
Hi all,
I just want to know why when I'm installing jdk sometimes ask me to
reboot and sometimes he don't. As part of our installation, we launch
the jdk installation if it's not already installed, so it's important
to know when the user will be asked to reboot.


I've installed dozens of JDKs on OS/2 and Linux, and have never had to
reboot the system.

Of course, you may be running some different platform -- I don't know,
you didn't specify.

Brad BARCLAY

--
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
From the OS/2 WARP v4.5 Desktop of Brad BARCLAY.
The jSyncManager Project: http://www.jsyncmanager.org


Jul 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
Maybe because it install also jre, which change some things in the
windows registry, and I think some windows versions can reload the
registry "dynamically" (winnt-2000-xp...), and other can not (win95-98...)

Stephane Dalpe wrote:
Hi all,
I just want to know why when I'm installing jdk sometimes ask me to
reboot and sometimes he don't. As part of our installation, we launch
the jdk installation if it's not already installed, so it's important
to know when the user will be asked to reboot.

Thanks


Jul 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
Brad BARCLAY <bb******@jsyncmanager.org> wrote in message news:<U7******************@news04.bloor.is.net.cab le.rogers.com>...
Stephane Dalpe wrote:
Hi all,
I just want to know why when I'm installing jdk sometimes ask me to
reboot and sometimes he don't. As part of our installation, we launch
the jdk installation if it's not already installed, so it's important
to know when the user will be asked to reboot.


I've installed dozens of JDKs on OS/2 and Linux, and have never had to
reboot the system.

Of course, you may be running some different platform -- I don't know,
you didn't specify.

Brad BARCLAY

Personnally, I was never ask for rebooting, but someone here in the QA
team was asked on Win2000. I've tried on win2000 and winXP, with older
version of JDK, without older version, uninstall - reboot - reinstall,
uninstall and reinstall without rebooting... and I was never asked.
I've look in the documentation, it say that "you may be ask"... thanks
for the details.
Jul 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
"Christophe M." <mc******@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<3f**********@news.vo.lu>...
Maybe because it install also jre, which change some things in the
windows registry, and I think some windows versions can reload the
registry "dynamically" (winnt-2000-xp...), and other can not (win95-98...)

Stephane Dalpe wrote:
Hi all,
I just want to know why when I'm installing jdk sometimes ask me to
reboot and sometimes he don't. As part of our installation, we launch
the jdk installation if it's not already installed, so it's important
to know when the user will be asked to reboot.

Thanks


I've tried with JRE already install and without the JRE. We only use
win2000 or winXP here. Me, I was never ask for rebooting, but someone
here on win2000 was asked.
Jul 17 '05 #5

P: n/a
"Stephane Dalpe" <da***@interfacing.com> wrote in message
news:21**************************@posting.google.c om...
Hi all,
I just want to know why when I'm installing jdk sometimes ask me to
reboot and sometimes he don't. As part of our installation, we launch
the jdk installation if it's not already installed, so it's important
to know when the user will be asked to reboot.


In most cases, when an install sometimes asks for a reboot and sometimes
it doesn't, it's because a file or directory (or other resource) was in use
and
locked. This can be a text editor, browser, etc. with a target file open in
it
(the file doesn't even have to be currently open if the tool failed to
unlock
the file when it was done).

If you've closed all applications (which you should), and it still happens,
it's likely that a service is accessing something in the target area. Check
the processes tab in the task manager and see if something looks likely.
(Obviously if you see 'java' running it's a likely candidate.)

Incidentally, email programs can sometimes have a serious impact on windows
installs - Outlook, especially, can make an install look like it has
stopped.
(Usually it hasn't, but it can take a LONG time to complete.) This doesn't
usually require a reboot, though.

Then next time it happens, you could try searching the registry for the key
"Runonce" (I think that's it) and see if you can discover what operation is
being blocked during the install. -Wm
Jul 17 '05 #6

P: n/a
On Thu, 04 Sep 2003 08:06:12 +0100, "Christophe M." <mc******@yahoo.com>
two-finger typed:
Stephane Dalpe wrote:
Hi all,
I just want to know why when I'm installing jdk sometimes ask me to
reboot and sometimes he don't. As part of our installation, we launch
the jdk installation if it's not already installed, so it's important
to know when the user will be asked to reboot.

Thanks
Maybe because it install also jre, which change some things in the
windows registry, and I think some windows versions can reload the
registry "dynamically" (winnt-2000-xp...), and other can not (win95-98...)


The DOS heritage 32-bit Windows versions (Win 95/98, and perhaps
Millennium) get their PATH variable from the AUTOEXEC.BAT.

That means that that variable only changes (as seen by the system) after a
reboot.
Windows NT, 2000 and XP have the variables set in the 32-bit environment
and can change them on-the-fly.

For the JRE Plugins to work in Netscape, Opera or Mozilla (from what I have
experienced in Win2000), and the java.exe and appletviewer.exe command to
be available to the console/DOS Prompt (although a batchfile in a directory
that IS in the path can provide relief), the PATH environment variable
needs to have the JRE's bin directory in it.

So a reboot is needed in Win95/98(/Me?).

It should be entirely unnessessary in Win NT and its ilk, though.

Cheers.
--
From a guy who was involved in computer and DOS/Windows from the good old
days (PC computing since 1989 when Commodore released the AMIGA PC XT
Bridgeboard with a 8088 @4.77 Mhz... Argh! I'm Oooooold... and unemployed
:-(
Jul 17 '05 #7

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