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i am student of MCA. i want to know what ....

i am student of MCA. i want to know what things are needed to be a
efficient programmer in c and c++.

Aug 28 '07 #1
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<ha**************@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@x40g2000prg.googlegr oups.com...
>i am student of MCA. i want to know what things are needed to be a
efficient programmer in c and c++.
The C language doesn't take long to learn. However it takes a long time to
be really effective. The only answer is to write lots of code.

--
Free games and programming goodies.
http://www.personal.leeds.ac.uk/~bgy1mm

Aug 28 '07 #2
>>>>"MMcL" == Malcolm McLean <re*******@btinternet.comwrites:

MMcL<ha**************@gmail.comwrote in message
MMcLnews:11**********************@x40g2000prg.goog legroups.com...
>i am student of MCA. i want to know what things are needed to
be a efficient programmer in c and c++.
MMcLThe C language doesn't take long to learn. However it takes
MMcLa long time to be really effective. The only answer is to
MMcLwrite lots of code.

There's more to the answer than that. If you write code uncritically,
you don't learn C very well, and you wind up with a great steaming
pile of bad code. Examples abound, and if you pay attention for a
week in this group you'll find several.

Read other people's code - but don't assume that just because it's in
production, or because it's published, or because it's part of a
high-profile open source project that it's good. Compile and run your
code in as many different environments as you can, so you can avoid
the "all the world's a Vax^W^Wan x86" misconception. Use the best
automated code-checking tools (such as lint and gcc -Wall) that you
can find. Read through the C standard that you're adhering to; you
probably won't understand it at first, but the more C you learn, the
more you'll understand it. Have more experienced programmers review
your code and comment on it, and pay attention to and learn from their
comments. Remember that if a dozen experts disagree with you, there's
a damn good chance that you're wrong and they're right; to be Galileo,
it is not sufficient that the establishment disagree with you, but for
the establishment to be wrong.

And programming is a separate skill from knowing the syntax and
semantics of a language. Far too many people think that they are
programmers when they have a loose grip on the syntax and no grip at
all on the semantics of a single programming language. The more you
equate "learning C" with "learning to program" the worse you will end
up doing at both.

Further good advice: http://norvig.com/21-days.html

Charlton

--
Charlton Wilbur
cw*****@chromatico.net
Aug 28 '07 #3

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