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Container Class

P: n/a
I'm going through the Koeing book Accelerated C++ in an attempt to
understand Container classes. Of course I'm going through a paradigm
shift from C to C++.
So now I've got

struct Header
{
int source : 3;
int length : 4;
int count : 9
}

struct My_Struct
{
Header header;
// data
}

struct My_Other_Struct
{
Header header;
// data
}
// then later ... Rx_1553_Data
void Rx_1553_Data ( void )
{
unsigned char buffer [ 512 ];

// later
Read_1553_Data ( CHANNEL_FIVE, &buffer );
Parse_Rx_Message (&buffer);
// more stuff.
}

Now Parse_Rx_Message will look at the appropriate header then memcopy
to the appropriate struct (either My_Stuct or My_Other_Struct) .
Trouble is I'd like to keep 'this' generic. In essense, use a
container class to handle all the memcopy etc. This 'generic'
container class will setup structs, compare structs etc. Does anyone
have an example that does this.

Wading through Koeing and would like to overhaul some 'test' code
which will hopefully help me understand the template/container aspect
of ++.

Thanks in advance
Jul 19 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
"MPowell" <mp********@hotmail.com> wrote...
I'm going through the Koeing book Accelerated C++ in an attempt to
understand Container classes. Of course I'm going through a paradigm
shift from C to C++.
So now I've got

struct Header
{
int source : 3;
int length : 4;
int count : 9
} ;
struct My_Struct
{
Header header;
// data
} ;
struct My_Other_Struct
{
Header header;
// data
} ;

// then later ... Rx_1553_Data
void Rx_1553_Data ( void )
{
unsigned char buffer [ 512 ];

// later
Read_1553_Data ( CHANNEL_FIVE, &buffer );
Parse_Rx_Message (&buffer);
// more stuff.
}

Now Parse_Rx_Message will look at the appropriate header then memcopy
to the appropriate struct (either My_Stuct or My_Other_Struct) .
Trouble is I'd like to keep 'this' generic. In essense, use a
container class to handle all the memcopy etc.
Why not let each class handle its own copying/creation from bytes?
This 'generic'
container class will setup structs, compare structs etc. Does anyone
have an example that does this.
Find and read about serialisation. It's not as simple an issue
to be described in a reply to a newsgroup posting.

In general, there should be some kind of distinctive marking in
the memory that would make it one object and not any other. If
you find that mark, then a serialiser object should be used to
create a certain structure from the stream/bunch of bytes. The
serialisers usually are registered with the stream reader and
associated with those marks (or you could query all registered
serialisers to know which one will be responsible)...
Wading through Koeing and would like to overhaul some 'test' code
which will hopefully help me understand the template/container aspect
of ++.


I don't think you're in that area "of ++". I may be mistaken,
of course.

Victor
Jul 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
MPowell wrote:
I'm going through the Koeing book Accelerated C++ in an attempt to
understand Container classes. Of course I'm going through a paradigm
shift from C to C++.
So now I've got

struct Header
{
int source : 3;
int length : 4;
int count : 9
}

struct My_Struct
{
Header header;
// data
}

struct My_Other_Struct
{
Header header;
// data
}
// then later ... Rx_1553_Data
void Rx_1553_Data ( void )
{
unsigned char buffer [ 512 ];

// later
Read_1553_Data ( CHANNEL_FIVE, &buffer );
Parse_Rx_Message (&buffer);
// more stuff.
}
One way is this:

==============
interfaces - in your header file
==============

//
// declare all the different "types" of messages
class AlphaMessageType;
class BetaMessageType;
....
class GammaMessageType;

//
// define the base message interface
class BaseMessageType
{
public:
virtual ~BaseMessageType() {};

virtual bool ProcessMe( MessageProcessor * processor ) = 0;

virtual bool Deserialize( void * data ) = 0;
};

//
// All classes that need to "process" a message derive from
// this class and implement the Process() methods they care about.
//
class MessageProcessor
{
public:
bool Process( AlphaMessageType * message ) { return false };
bool Process( BetaMessageType * message ) { return false };
...
bool Process( GammaMessageType * message ) { return false };
};

//
// define the specific INTERFACES for each type of message
//
class AlphaMessageType : public BaseMessageType
{
... stuff particular to AlpaMessageType ...

};
==========================

Message Implementations

//
// Each message has an implementation
//
class AlphaMessageTypeImpl : public AlphaMessageType
{

virtual bool ProcessMe( MessageProcessor * processor )
{
return processor->Process( this );
}

AlphaSerializedDataStuff * stuff;
... must implement message specific deserialiser
... and serializer
... and copier
... and whatever else that is message specific

};

//
// register the message in a factory registry ...
//
REGISTER_IN_FACTORY( AlphaMessageTypeImpl, AlphaMessageKey );

etc for all the message types.
BaseMessageType * Parse_Rx_Message( void * buffer )
{

Header * hdr = reinterpet_cast<Header *>( buffer );

if ( ! CheckHeader( hdr ) )
{
return false;
}

BaseMessageType * msg =
MessageFactoryCreate( GetMessageType( hdr ) );

if ( msg == 0 )
{
return 0;
}

if ( msg->Deserialize( buffer ) == false )
{
delete msg;
return 0;
}

return msg;
}

=========================

If you get clever, you can use a template to create message
implementations. There's a few more steps than what I show here but
this should be enough. Still a number of issues need to be solved here,
- partial deserialization issues
- endian issues
- forward compatability
- error recovery
Now, to process the message you can derive from MessageProcessor and
implement the methods that work for you or you can simply "cast" using
somthing like this:

template <typename T> class MessageCast
: public virtual MessageProcessor
{
T m_message;
public:

MessageCast( BaseMessageType * message )
: m_message( 0 )
{
if ( message != 0 ) {
message->ProcessMe( this );
}
}

bool Process( T w_message )
{
m_message = w_message;
return true;
}

operator T ()
{
return m_message;
}

};
This may be used just like dynamic_cast

e.g.

AlphaMessageType * amsg =
MessageCast<AlphaMessageType *>( base_msg );

if ( amsg != 0 )
{
// base_msg is an Alpha message - do somthing
.....

Now Parse_Rx_Message will look at the appropriate header then memcopy
to the appropriate struct (either My_Stuct or My_Other_Struct) .
Trouble is I'd like to keep 'this' generic. In essense, use a
container class to handle all the memcopy etc. This 'generic'
container class will setup structs, compare structs etc. Does anyone
have an example that does this.

Wading through Koeing and would like to overhaul some 'test' code
which will hopefully help me understand the template/container aspect
of ++.


In the above design, templates enter the picture once you have
solidified the requirements. At this point, I would write some test
code that would exercise all the failure scenarios so that you can
create a more generic interface and hence do s better job designing a
class hierarchy for message implementations.

Jul 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
<MPowell>
I'm going through the Koeing book Accelerated C++ in an attempt to
understand Container classes.
</MPowell>

What part of Accelerated C++ are you in?
Jul 19 '05 #4

P: n/a
MPowell wrote:
[redacted]


Totally OT, but what the hey. You have my sympathy. Actually, anybody who writes MIL-STD-1553 drivers
has my sympathy (since I've been there, done that, and got the T-Shirt).

red floyd
Jul 19 '05 #5

P: n/a
Gianni Mariani <gi*******@mariani.ws> wrote in message news:<bj********@dispatch.concentric.net>...
MPowell wrote:
I'm going through the Koeing book Accelerated C++ in an attempt to
understand Container classes. Of course I'm going through a paradigm
shift from C to C++.
So now I've got

struct Header
{
int source : 3;
int length : 4;
int count : 9
}

struct My_Struct
{
Header header;
// data
}

struct My_Other_Struct
{
Header header;
// data
}
// then later ... Rx_1553_Data
void Rx_1553_Data ( void )
{
unsigned char buffer [ 512 ];

// later
Read_1553_Data ( CHANNEL_FIVE, &buffer );
Parse_Rx_Message (&buffer);
// more stuff.
}
One way is this:

==============
interfaces - in your header file
==============

//
// declare all the different "types" of messages
class AlphaMessageType;
class BetaMessageType;
...
class GammaMessageType;

//
// define the base message interface
class BaseMessageType
{
public:
virtual ~BaseMessageType() {};

virtual bool ProcessMe( MessageProcessor * processor ) = 0;

virtual bool Deserialize( void * data ) = 0;
};

//
// All classes that need to "process" a message derive from
// this class and implement the Process() methods they care about.
//
class MessageProcessor
{
public:
bool Process( AlphaMessageType * message ) { return false };
bool Process( BetaMessageType * message ) { return false };
...
bool Process( GammaMessageType * message ) { return false };
};

//
// define the specific INTERFACES for each type of message
//
class AlphaMessageType : public BaseMessageType
{
... stuff particular to AlpaMessageType ...

};
==========================

Message Implementations

//
// Each message has an implementation
//
class AlphaMessageTypeImpl : public AlphaMessageType
{

virtual bool ProcessMe( MessageProcessor * processor )
{
return processor->Process( this );
}

AlphaSerializedDataStuff * stuff;
... must implement message specific deserialiser
... and serializer
... and copier
... and whatever else that is message specific

};


What exactly is a 'copier'? Book didnt seem to highlight that.
Truly appreaciate the help. I suspect "Serialization" is the way to
go. Would it be too much to ask for some assistance on say ONE
complete class that highlights serialization from top to bottom, more
specifically i'm trying to garner a feel for what the above means?

//
// register the message in a factory registry ...
//
REGISTER_IN_FACTORY( AlphaMessageTypeImpl, AlphaMessageKey );

etc for all the message types.
BaseMessageType * Parse_Rx_Message( void * buffer )
{

Header * hdr = reinterpet_cast<Header *>( buffer );

if ( ! CheckHeader( hdr ) )
{
return false;
}

BaseMessageType * msg =
MessageFactoryCreate( GetMessageType( hdr ) );

if ( msg == 0 )
{
return 0;
}

if ( msg->Deserialize( buffer ) == false )
{
delete msg;
return 0;
}

return msg;
}

=========================

If you get clever, you can use a template to create message
implementations. There's a few more steps than what I show here but
this should be enough. Still a number of issues need to be solved here,
- partial deserialization issues
- endian issues
- forward compatability
- error recovery
Here again I'd really like to garner a feel for full understanding on
some of this.

Now, to process the message you can derive from MessageProcessor and
implement the methods that work for you or you can simply "cast" using
somthing like this:

template <typename T> class MessageCast
: public virtual MessageProcessor
{
T m_message;
public:

MessageCast( BaseMessageType * message )
: m_message( 0 )
{
if ( message != 0 ) {
message->ProcessMe( this );
}
}

bool Process( T w_message )
{
m_message = w_message;
return true;
}

operator T ()
{
return m_message;
}

};
Does teh Process (below) function above do a memcopy of sorts, or is
that resident in the implementation of the specific class, derived off
the base (MessageProcessor) class

I'm off to read up on Serializing.

This may be used just like dynamic_cast

e.g.

AlphaMessageType * amsg =
MessageCast<AlphaMessageType *>( base_msg );

if ( amsg != 0 )
{
// base_msg is an Alpha message - do somthing
....

Now Parse_Rx_Message will look at the appropriate header then memcopy
to the appropriate struct (either My_Stuct or My_Other_Struct) .
Trouble is I'd like to keep 'this' generic. In essense, use a
container class to handle all the memcopy etc. This 'generic'
container class will setup structs, compare structs etc. Does anyone
have an example that does this.

Wading through Koeing and would like to overhaul some 'test' code
which will hopefully help me understand the template/container aspect
of ++.


In the above design, templates enter the picture once you have
solidified the requirements. At this point, I would write some test
code that would exercise all the failure scenarios so that you can
create a more generic interface and hence do s better job designing a
class hierarchy for message implementations.


Thanks a lot.... Good start.
Jul 19 '05 #6

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