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Historical Turbo C 1.5 (1987)

I am looking for a copy of Turbo C 1.5 from 1987 for some historical
research I'm doing into computing from that time period.

Oct 18 '06 #1
16 3216

sc***@skwc.com wrote:
I am looking for a copy of Turbo C 1.5 from 1987 for some historical
research I'm doing into computing from that time period.
Might be at:

http://community.borland.com/museum/

Oct 18 '06 #2
Ancient_Hacker wrote:
sc***@skwc.com wrote:
I am looking for a copy of Turbo C 1.5 from 1987 for some historical
research I'm doing into computing from that time period.

Might be at:

http://community.borland.com/museum/
No :(

The earliest version they have is 2.x. The museum seems to have been
abandoned - a posting said 1.0 and 1.5 were "soon" to be added, but
then the museum was closed.

Oct 18 '06 #3
Turbo C 1.0 and 1.5 were different from 2.0 -- by the time 2.0 came
out, Borland was switching to its "classic" blue window that was seen
from that point onward. Version 1 had the black background in Turbo
Basic 1.1 and Turbo Prolog 2, which were contemporaries. By the time
Turbo C 2 came out, the black background products were gone - the main
Turbo C and Turbo Pascal got the "classic" look in their next releases.
For historical accuracy in screen grabs and something I'm writing, I
would like to be able to do screen captures of 1.5. I have been unable
to find it at the Borland museum, Vetusware.com, eMule, etc although
almost all other versions are available; I haven't even seen it for
sale. (Note: The museum has Turbo *C++* 1.0, which is OFTEN mislabeled
as "Turbo C 1.0". The Turbo C labelled as 1.0 at Vetusware.com is
actually 2.0.) The only hope I have is if someone has a copy...

I am also not sure if 1.5 implements the then-draft ANSI standard. I am
eager to look into the header files and see if it does. 2.0, which was
released in 1988, seems to adhere to what was still (I think) a draft
standard at the time it came out. The 1.5 release may still have been a
K&R compiler. (The 1.0 release is said to be extremely buggy - 1.5 was
a release that apparently was more a bug fix than anything else.)

Oct 18 '06 #4
On 18 Oct 2006 04:02:18 -0700, sc***@skwc.com wrote:
>I am looking for a copy of Turbo C 1.5 from 1987 for some historical
research I'm doing into computing from that time period.
Ask in alt.folklore.computers. They can probably help with the
research, too.

--
Al Balmer
Sun City, AZ
Oct 18 '06 #5

sc***@skwc.com wrote:
I am looking for a copy of Turbo C 1.5 from 1987 for some historical
research I'm doing into computing from that time period.
If the state of things in 1987 counts as "historical research" I don't
know what that makes many of us ...

Oct 18 '06 #6
"J. J. Farrell" <jj*@bcs.org.ukwrites:
sc***@skwc.com wrote:
>I am looking for a copy of Turbo C 1.5 from 1987 for some historical
research I'm doing into computing from that time period.

If the state of things in 1987 counts as "historical research" I don't
know what that makes many of us ...
Old.

(Sorry.)

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
Oct 18 '06 #7
Keith Thompson wrote:
"J. J. Farrell" <jj*@bcs.org.ukwrites:
>>sc***@skwc.com wrote:
>>>I am looking for a copy of Turbo C 1.5 from 1987 for some historical
research I'm doing into computing from that time period.

If the state of things in 1987 counts as "historical research" I don't
know what that makes many of us ...


Old.

(Sorry.)
almost fossilized (why be sorry?, be gratefull)
Oct 19 '06 #8
"J. J. Farrell" wrote:
sc***@skwc.com wrote:
>I am looking for a copy of Turbo C 1.5 from 1987 for some
historical research I'm doing into computing from that time period.

If the state of things in 1987 counts as "historical research" I
don't know what that makes many of us ...
I've found out every time I looked for a job in the past 20 years.

--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>
Oct 19 '06 #9

J. J. Farrell wrote:
If the state of things in 1987 counts as "historical research" I don't
know what that makes many of us ...
Anything in the past is historical research :) I'm waiting until I
finish this to start on future research :)

Oct 19 '06 #10
J. J. Farrell <jj*@bcs.org.ukwrote:
If the state of things in 1987 counts as "historical research" I don't
know what that makes many of us ...
I was watching "Gumby" in 1987, so I wouldn't know :-)

--
C. Benson Manica | I *should* know what I'm talking about - if I
cbmanica(at)gmail.com | don't, I need to know. Flames welcome.
Oct 19 '06 #11
Sjouke Burry wrote:
>
Keith Thompson wrote:
"J. J. Farrell" <jj*@bcs.org.ukwrites:
>sc***@skwc.com wrote:

I am looking for a copy of Turbo C 1.5 from 1987 for some historical
research I'm doing into computing from that time period.

If the state of things in 1987 counts as "historical research" I don't
know what that makes many of us ...

Old.

(Sorry.)
almost fossilized (why be sorry?, be gratefull)
ITYM "FOSSILized".

--
+-------------------------+--------------------+-----------------------+
| Kenneth J. Brody | www.hvcomputer.com | #include |
| kenbrody/at\spamcop.net | www.fptech.com | <std_disclaimer.h|
+-------------------------+--------------------+-----------------------+
Don't e-mail me at: <mailto:Th*************@gmail.com>
Oct 19 '06 #12
Christopher Benson-Manica wrote:
>
J. J. Farrell <jj*@bcs.org.ukwrote:
If the state of things in 1987 counts as "historical research" I don't
know what that makes many of us ...

I was watching "Gumby" in 1987, so I wouldn't know :-)
I wrote my first computer program when the Apollo 16 astronauts
were still in training.

--
+-------------------------+--------------------+-----------------------+
| Kenneth J. Brody | www.hvcomputer.com | #include |
| kenbrody/at\spamcop.net | www.fptech.com | <std_disclaimer.h|
+-------------------------+--------------------+-----------------------+
Don't e-mail me at: <mailto:Th*************@gmail.com>
Oct 19 '06 #13

sc***@skwc.com 写道:
Turbo C 1.0 and 1.5 were different from 2.0 -- by the time 2.0 came
out, Borland was switching to its "classic" blue window that was seen
from that point onward. Version 1 had the black background in Turbo
Basic 1.1 and Turbo Prolog 2, which were contemporaries. By the time
Turbo C 2 came out, the black background products were gone - the main
Turbo C and Turbo Pascal got the "classic" look in their next releases.
For historical accuracy in screen grabs and something I'm writing, I
would like to be able to do screen captures of 1.5. I have been unable
to find it at the Borland museum, Vetusware.com, eMule, etc although
almost all other versions are available; I haven't even seen it for
sale. (Note: The museum has Turbo *C++* 1.0, which is OFTEN mislabeled
as "Turbo C 1.0". The Turbo C labelled as 1.0 at Vetusware.com is
actually 2.0.) The only hope I have is if someone has a copy...

I am also not sure if 1.5 implements the then-draft ANSI standard. I am
eager to look into the header files and see if it does. 2.0, which was
released in 1988, seems to adhere to what was still (I think) a draft
standard at the time it came out. The 1.5 release may still have been a
K&R compiler. (The 1.0 release is said to be extremely buggy - 1.5 was
a release that apparently was more a bug fix than anything else.)

Could you tell me what is a K&R compiler?(I know them, but what is the
compiler?)

Oct 19 '06 #14
ne**********@gmail.com wrote:
Could you tell me what is a K&R compiler?(I know them, but what is the
compiler?)
A compiler which implements the pre-ANSI C language as described in the
original K&R 1978 book. The most noticeable difference is the lack of
function prototypes. By 1987, the ANSI C standard was well into draft
format, and the function prototypes had been borrowed from C++. Turbo C
1.0 and 1.5 seem to both implement the standard as much as possible.

I have found several compilers which predate ANSI C for the IBM PC. One
is the original MIX C (not Power C, which they still sell, it
implements the ANSI standard). I contacted MIX, who are still in
business, and they no longer have copies (!) of their original C
compiler. If anyone has it, I'd be very interested in trying it, too.
There is something called C88 which is a K&R C compiler which was NOT
released in 88, but much earlier - don't know where the 88 comes from.
There is a Digital Research C (and PL/I! wild!) compiler for DOS which
is also K&R. Many "small c" dialects and interpreters are also K&R. I
don't know about Microsoft, since I've never found any of their early C
compilers. The only one I have ever had was C/C++ 7 which was very late
(mid-90s). There are many other C compilers, of course. I've just found
a few.

I'm also looking for Zortech C++ 1.0 from 1988. It was the first native
DOS C++ compiler and is historically extremely important, but the
earliest version on the net is 3.1 from the mid 90s. An epoch-marking
release like this needs to be someplace accessible before it is totally
forgotten.

Scott

PS: I never used an IBM PC until I got out of college - I had a high
school programming class in 1987 that used BASICA on IBM PCs for
programming - it was a Pascal class, but they got rid of the Apple II e
computers with Apple Instant Pascal during the Christmas break, and had
new IBM PCs with no software! So I missed a lot of the era I am
researching. I learned C on DEC Ultrix and SPARC machines in college.

Oct 19 '06 #15
Op 19 Oct 2006 09:49:44 -0700 schreef sc***@skwc.com:

<snip>
There is something called C88 which is a K&R C compiler which was NOT
released in 88, but much earlier - don't know where the 88 comes from.
I think it refers to the 8088, the first CPU used in the PC.
Possibly a development of a hypothetical(?) C80 for the 8080, if that would
have existed.
--
Coos
Oct 19 '06 #16
To conclude the thread, I have found copies of the software in question
(early Turbo C) and a longer thread about it is in
alt.folklore.computers if anyone is interested in the details.

Oct 23 '06 #17

This discussion thread is closed

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