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Need help choosing a C++ development tool set - TIA for responses :)

P: n/a
Jed
Hello to all!
I have a couple of projects I intend starting on, and was wondering if
someone here could make a suggestion for a good compiler and development
environment.

My goals are as follows:

1. Develop the project code on XP.
2. Develop the project to run on Linux, XP, and 98SE/WinME.
(Later for porting to MacOS)
3. Develop the project to have a "common look and feel" between
platforms.

My requirements are as follows:
1. I need a compiler and development environment that is free and
unrestrictive with respect to liscensing and royalties.

2. I need graphics tool kit that is cross platform, and also free.

3. I also want to be able to target multiple OSes for the same processor
type.

Any advice is welcome. Primarily, I don't have the income to purchase
tools. And I want a development tool set that isn't tied to Microsoft's
OS, or their frameworks. I don't understand their liscensing and am
pretty sure their software comes with a bunch of restrictions I don't
want to have to deal with.

I've been doing some research, and currently have downloaded Mars,
Watcom, and am trying to figure out what I need to download MinGW.

I would like to use the Gnome toolkit, but haven't been able to figure
out if it works with windows. My primary development platform is
Windows, but I am going to set up a Linux Box specifically for
simultaneous development and testing.

The projects I want to develop I will be placing (another thing I will
need advice on) in the open source community. At least I hope to. The
projects will be "beg-ware" in the hopes of turning a buck. They will
also serve to provide me with tools that I can use.

I don't plan on doing DOTNET. I know it's the hot thing, but I have
recently developed mis-givings about it.

Thanks for any help.

Peace,

Jed
Oct 1 '05 #1
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28 Replies


P: n/a
Jed wrote:
I have a couple of projects I intend starting on, and was wondering if
someone here could make a suggestion for a good compiler and
development environment.

My goals are as follows:

1. Develop the project code on XP.
Visual C++ Professional.
2. Develop the project to run on Linux, XP, and 98SE/WinME.
(Later for porting to MacOS)
Well, on Linux, with some porting, you can use g++ to compile. At
this point in time both compilers are quite decent (and on par as
to standard compliance, I'd say).
3. Develop the project to have a "common look and feel" between
platforms.
I would recommend against it. It is better to have the look and
feel common between applications on the same platform than between
platforms. Or do you foresee users working in your application on
more than one platform within a couple of days? Even then, it is
easier to look at something on Windows that looks like Windows, and
not like Aqua or Motif (and vice versa).
My requirements are as follows:
1. I need a compiler and development environment that is free and
unrestrictive with respect to liscensing and royalties.
Microsoft isn't free, but it's not very expensive. You can also use
MinGW, and use Dev-C++, but it pales in comparison (or maybe I am
just too used to VC++).
2. I need graphics tool kit that is cross platform, and also free.
Qt is free for non-commercial use. If you intend to sell your stuff,
though, you need to get a commercial license from them. But it is
worth every penny.
3. I also want to be able to target multiple OSes for the same
processor type.
How would that matter? Are you going to program in Assembly?
Any advice is welcome. Primarily, I don't have the income to purchase
tools. And I want a development tool set that isn't tied to
Microsoft's OS, or their frameworks. I don't understand their
liscensing and am pretty sure their software comes with a bunch of
restrictions I don't want to have to deal with.
There is nothing overly restrictive there. And if you don't have
any money now, borrow. A good set of tools is important.
I've been doing some research, and currently have downloaded Mars,
Watcom, and am trying to figure out what I need to download MinGW.

I would like to use the Gnome toolkit, but haven't been able to figure
out if it works with windows. My primary development platform is
Windows, but I am going to set up a Linux Box specifically for
simultaneous development and testing.
Get Qt. You're not going to regret it.
The projects I want to develop I will be placing (another thing I will
need advice on) in the open source community. At least I hope to.
Well, take a look at SourceForge (is that what it's called?), talk to
them, see how (and with what) they program.
The projects will be "beg-ware" in the hopes of turning a buck. They
will also serve to provide me with tools that I can use.
Well, think of it. You cannot start delivering pizzas on a bicycle,
hoping to earn some day enough money to buy a car. Your pizzas will
get so cold you'll have to pay your customers to eat them. You just
need to buy a car to get around and deliver on time.
I don't plan on doing DOTNET. I know it's the hot thing, but I have
recently developed mis-givings about it.


You don't have to do anything DOTNET, but you can still use MS tools,
they are among the best in the biz when it comes to development in C++
on Windows.

V
Oct 1 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Sat, 1 Oct 2005 00:21:06 -0400, "Victor Bazarov" <v.********@comAcast.net>
wrote:
Microsoft isn't free, but it's not very expensive. You can also use
MinGW, and use Dev-C++, but it pales in comparison (or maybe I am
just too used to VC++).


Lookie here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/visualc/vctoolkit2003/

You don't get a debugger though.

-dr
Oct 1 '05 #3

P: n/a
On Sat, 01 Oct 2005 05:35:35 GMT, Dave Rahardja <as*@me.com> wrote:
On Sat, 1 Oct 2005 00:21:06 -0400, "Victor Bazarov" <v.********@comAcast.net>
wrote:
Microsoft isn't free, but it's not very expensive. You can also use
MinGW, and use Dev-C++, but it pales in comparison (or maybe I am
just too used to VC++).


Lookie here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/visualc/vctoolkit2003/

You don't get a debugger though.


And the only CRT libs (C runtime library) are static. You have to buy
Visual Studio for the DLL import libraries for the CRT. It's not
important for small projects, academic work, etc., but for large
projects, it's a real show-stopper.

--
Bob Hairgrove
No**********@Home.com
Oct 1 '05 #4

P: n/a
One option would be to use VC++ for development.

A good cross platform GUI solution is wxWindows:

http://www.wxwindows.org/

--
EventStudio System Designer 2.5 - http://www.EventHelix.com/EventStudio
Sequence Diagram Based System Design and Object Modeling Tool

Oct 1 '05 #5

P: n/a
Jed
"Victor Bazarov" <v.********@comAcast.net> wrote in
news:qb********************@comcast.com:
Jed wrote: ....
Visual C++ Professional.

Well, on Linux, with some porting, you can use g++ to compile. At
this point in time both compilers are quite decent (and on par as
to standard compliance, I'd say).
I was wondering if g++ was a C++ compiler. Hummm... I won't rule VC++
out. But, it has some quirks (at least when I was attempting to learn to
use it a few years ago [VC++ 6 educational version].
....
I would recommend against it. It is better to have the look and
feel common between applications on the same platform than between
platforms. Or do you foresee users working in your application on
more than one platform within a couple of days? Even then, it is
easier to look at something on Windows that looks like Windows, and
not like Aqua or Motif (and vice versa).
Good point. Thank you! :)

Ultimately, I want to develop using a common graphics tool kit so I can
minimize the issues when porting from Win to Linux, and ultimately beyond.
....
Microsoft isn't free, but it's not very expensive. You can also use
MinGW, and use Dev-C++, but it pales in comparison (or maybe I am
just too used to VC++).
2. I need graphics tool kit that is cross platform, and also free.
Qt is free for non-commercial use. If you intend to sell your stuff,
though, you need to get a commercial license from them. But it is
worth every penny.


Thanks I'll look into it. Its been a while since I've looked at these
things, and I forgot about Trolltech.
3. I also want to be able to target multiple OSes for the same
processor type.


How would that matter? Are you going to program in Assembly?

I may do some "optimization" as I can figure it out, but that's not the
primary reason. I figure the multiple target approach is better to selling
an app than writing for one os. So I want to develop a useful app that
someone who runs Windows, Linux and Mac in the same shop will want. If the
app is useful (performs some commonly needed function) and works the same
way over several systems, then I have wider potential revenue streams.
....
There is nothing overly restrictive there. And if you don't have
any money now, borrow. A good set of tools is important.
I agree with you that good set of tools is important, ergo the question.
Thank you for the advice, and I am considering it. But let me ask you a
couple of questions: You recommend VC++. Are you talking the the version
6 edition, or the .NET addition? And why not Borland C++ Builder? And
what about g++? Have you used it? You prefer Qt. Have you used Gnome
Tool Kit? (and is that available for windows?)

Sorry to ask so many questions but I am trying to make the most economical
and informed choices I can. And I figure you guys in here have the
experience.

....
Well, take a look at SourceForge (is that what it's called?), talk to
them, see how (and with what) they program.

Good Idea!
The projects will be "beg-ware" in the hopes of turning a buck. They
will also serve to provide me with tools that I can use.


Well, think of it. You cannot start delivering pizzas on a bicycle,
hoping to earn some day enough money to buy a car. Your pizzas will
get so cold you'll have to pay your customers to eat them. You just
need to buy a car to get around and deliver on time.

hehe... I used to deliver pizza. Of course I did it in a $50.00 car. So I
made my money back. hehehe... :)
I don't plan on doing DOTNET. I know it's the hot thing, but I have
recently developed mis-givings about it.


You don't have to do anything DOTNET, but you can still use MS tools,
they are among the best in the biz when it comes to development in C++
on Windows.

V

And can I develop on them cross-platform?

Thanks for taking the time to respond Victor. I will definitely consider
the options you've mentioned.

Peace,

Jed
Oct 1 '05 #6

P: n/a
Jed
Dave Rahardja <as*@me.com> wrote in
news:9v********************************@4ax.com:
On Sat, 1 Oct 2005 00:21:06 -0400, "Victor Bazarov"
<v.********@comAcast.net> wrote:
Microsoft isn't free, but it's not very expensive. You can also use
MinGW, and use Dev-C++, but it pales in comparison (or maybe I am
just too used to VC++).


Lookie here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/visualc/vctoolkit2003/

You don't get a debugger though.

-dr


Wow!

Thanks dude!

Peace,

Jed
Oct 1 '05 #7

P: n/a
Jed
Bob Hairgrove <in*****@bigfoot.com> wrote in
news:fa********************************@4ax.com:
On Sat, 01 Oct 2005 05:35:35 GMT, Dave Rahardja <as*@me.com> wrote:

....
You don't get a debugger though.


And the only CRT libs (C runtime library) are static. You have to buy
Visual Studio for the DLL import libraries for the CRT. It's not
important for small projects, academic work, etc., but for large
projects, it's a real show-stopper.

--
Bob Hairgrove
No**********@Home.com


To clarify: I intend to develop the bulk of my application processing
code in standard C++. I want a cross-platform graphics toolkit that I
can develop the application's output in. Some of the apps will not need
printing capability.

Can I do this with VC++ (the version mentioned above)?

Peace,

Jed
Oct 1 '05 #8

P: n/a
Jed
"EventHelix.com" <ev********@gmail.com> wrote in
news:11**********************@z14g2000cwz.googlegr oups.com:
One option would be to use VC++ for development.

A good cross platform GUI solution is wxWindows:

http://www.wxwindows.org/

--
EventStudio System Designer 2.5 - http://www.EventHelix.com/EventStudio
Sequence Diagram Based System Design and Object Modeling Tool


Wow... thanks man!

Just went to the link and looked at it. Very cool...

I take it that it is not free? Not seeing anything about that anywhere on
their site..

Thanks!

Peace,

Jed
Oct 1 '05 #9

P: n/a

"Jed" <je*@theforge.com> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@207.217. 125.201...
I take it that it is not free? Not seeing anything about that anywhere on
their site..


With Qt4 Trolltech has released an open source version for
Windows, as well as Linux. I think the windows version only
runs with Cygwin though. It's a good product, although a bit
expensive for the commercial version if you're a single
developer.
Oct 1 '05 #10

P: n/a
Jed wrote:
"Victor Bazarov" <v.********@comAcast.net> wrote in
news:qb********************@comcast.com:
[...] Hummm... I won't rule
VC++ out. But, it has some quirks (at least when I was attempting to
learn to use it a few years ago [VC++ 6 educational version].
Oh, forget VC++ 6. It's older than my car (and that one has 100K miles
on it already), and definitely not worth using for any serious project
unless you have to (like you have libraries that don't work with later
versions of VC++). Get 7.1 or 8.0 (when it comes out later this year).
...
I agree with you that good set of tools is important, ergo the
question. Thank you for the advice, and I am considering it. But let
me ask you a couple of questions: You recommend VC++. Are you
talking the the version 6 edition, or the .NET addition?
I cannot recommend you version 6 simply because to get it from MS you'd
need to get v7.1 first, and that's what you really should be using. If
you extend your contemplation for a month or two, v8.0 will be out and
you should get that instead.
And why not
Borland C++ Builder?
I can't recommend it because it's been a while since I used it and even
then it fell short of my expectations of it.
And what about g++?
Having to do everything manually is a chore, although it would help you
keeping the projects in synch across platforms. VC++ is a system that
helps you organise your projects easier.
Have you used it?
Not on Windows, I haven't.
You
prefer Qt.
It's one of the most widely used toolkit in the industry.
Have you used Gnome Tool Kit? (and is that available for
windows?)
I don't know whether it's available on Windows, and it might not be.
And, no, I haven't used it.
Sorry to ask so many questions but I am trying to make the most
economical and informed choices I can. And I figure you guys in here
have the experience.
Don't dismiss newsgroups where they talk about operating systems as
another good source of information. This after all is a _language_
newsgroup, and not really a software development newsgroup. Try also
comp.software-eng.
...
I don't plan on doing DOTNET. I know it's the hot thing, but I have
recently developed mis-givings about it.


You don't have to do anything DOTNET, but you can still use MS tools,
they are among the best in the biz when it comes to development in
C++ on Windows.

V

And can I develop on them cross-platform?


Sure. That's what I do. And that's what my colleagues do. I do it
on Windows, they do it on Linux or HP-UX or...

V
Oct 1 '05 #11

P: n/a
Jed wrote:
Dave Rahardja <as*@me.com> wrote in
news:9v********************************@4ax.com:
On Sat, 1 Oct 2005 00:21:06 -0400, "Victor Bazarov"
<v.********@comAcast.net> wrote:
Microsoft isn't free, but it's not very expensive. You can also use
MinGW, and use Dev-C++, but it pales in comparison (or maybe I am
just too used to VC++).


Lookie here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/visualc/vctoolkit2003/

You don't get a debugger though.

-dr


Wow!


Well, it's free, but absence of a debugger (and the IDE) is a bummer.
Perhaps I am biased (or spoiled) because I've been using QuickC and
Visual C++ for more than a decade, and they come with all you need, but
you gotta buy those amenities. To have a debugger really takes the
prize. Inserting printf's all over code just to see what's going on
is not only tedious, it changes the behaviour of the code, and therefore
you don't get the right picture... Of course you could try using some
other debugger... If you can find something decent, that is.

Of course if you can switch from developing on XP to developing under
Linux, you will have access to tons of free tools.

V
Oct 1 '05 #12

P: n/a
"Duane Hebert" <sp**@flarn2.com> writes:
"Jed" <je*@theforge.com> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@207.217. 125.201...
I take it that it is not free? Not seeing anything about that anywhere on
their site..
With Qt4 Trolltech has released an open source version for
Windows, as well as Linux.


He was asking about wxWindows, not Qt.
I think the windows version only runs with Cygwin though.
The commercial version of Qt works with VC++.
It's a good product, although a bit
expensive for the commercial version if you're a single
developer.


A bit? According to Trolltech's pricing page, a single-user license for
developing a cross-platform (Windows/Linux/Mac) app begins at $3560USD -
and that's *without* the GUI library. If you want a GUI, it's $3980. If
you want OpenGL, database access, or XML, the price becomes $6600.

Qt is definitely a good product - I'd use it for a cross-platform open
source project in a heartbeat. But the pricing for the commercial version
is way out of range for a single developer, or even a small company.

sherm--

--
Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
Hire me! My resume: http://www.dot-app.org
Oct 1 '05 #13

P: n/a
Jed <je*@theforge.com> writes:
"EventHelix.com" <ev********@gmail.com> wrote in
news:11**********************@z14g2000cwz.googlegr oups.com:
A good cross platform GUI solution is wxWindows:

http://www.wxwindows.org/

Just went to the link and looked at it. Very cool...

I take it that it is not free? Not seeing anything about that anywhere on
their site..


There's a licensing page in the "Documentation" section. It's basically a
slightly modified LGPL license.

sherm--

--
Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
Hire me! My resume: http://www.dot-app.org
Oct 1 '05 #14

P: n/a

"Jed" <je*@theforge.com> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@207.217. 125.201...
"EventHelix.com" <ev********@gmail.com> wrote in
news:11**********************@z14g2000cwz.googlegr oups.com:
A good cross platform GUI solution is wxWindows:

http://www.wxwindows.org/


Wow... thanks man!


wxWindows also specifically supports the Digital Mars C++ compiler.

-Walter Bright
www.digitalmars.com C, C++, D programming language compilers
Oct 1 '05 #15

P: n/a

Jed wrote in message ...
Bob Hairgrove <in*****@bigfoot.com> wrote in
On Sat, 01 Oct 2005 05:35:35 GMT, Dave Rahardja <as*@me.com> wrote:...
You don't get a debugger though.


And the only CRT libs (C runtime library) are static. You have to buy
Visual Studio for the DLL import libraries for the CRT. It's not
important for small projects, academic work, etc., but for large
projects, it's a real show-stopper.
--
Bob Hairgrove
No**********@Home.com


To clarify: I intend to develop the bulk of my application processing
code in standard C++. I want a cross-platform graphics toolkit that I
can develop the application's output in. Some of the apps will not need
printing capability.


You want GCC (MinGW on window$) and wxWidgets.

Dev-C++ IDE: http://www.bloodshed.net/ (default==MinGW GCC)
[ ...and it comes with a debugger, gdb, and library. ]

wxWidgets URL: http://www.wxwidgets.org
[ both cost == $(download) ]

Can I do this with VC++ (the version mentioned above)?
Peace,
Jed


Will VC++ run on a GNU/Linux OS? Or a Mac OS?

[see my post in *.moderated, when it shows up tomorrow.<G>]
--
Bob R
POVrookie
--
MinGW (GNU compiler): http://www.mingw.org/
MinGWStudio http://www.parinyasoft.com/
V IDE & V GUI: http://www.objectcentral.com/
Quincy IDE 2005 URL: http://pipou.net/down/Quincy2005Project.zip
POVray: http://www.povray.org/
alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++ faq:
http://www.comeaucomputing.com/learn/faq/
Oct 1 '05 #16

P: n/a
"BobR" <Re***********@worldnet.att.net> writes:
Will VC++ run on a GNU/Linux OS? Or a Mac OS?


Obviously not, but who cares? Use VC++ on Windows, Xcode on Mac OS X, and
whatever on Linux.

sherm--

--
Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
Hire me! My resume: http://www.dot-app.org
Oct 2 '05 #17

P: n/a

Sherm Pendley wrote in message ...
"BobR" <Re***********@worldnet.att.net> writes:
Will VC++ run on a GNU/Linux OS? Or a Mac OS?
Obviously not, but who cares?


Someone who is developing on all three systems!
Use VC++ on Windows, Xcode on Mac OS X, and
whatever on Linux.
--
sherm--


Or, GCC for all. No $. Why learn a new compiler for each system?

(...and that's 'GNU/Linux' or 'GNU'. 'Linux' is a kernel for the 'GNU'
OS.<G>)
www.gnu.org

The choice is yours. Please make it an *informed* choice. :-}
[ Note: It's not 'either/or', you can put *all* the compilers on your
machine. ]
--
Bob R
POVrookie
Oct 2 '05 #18

P: n/a
Jed wrote:
Hello to all!
I have a couple of projects I intend starting on, and was wondering if
someone here could make a suggestion for a good compiler and development
environment.

My goals are as follows:

1. Develop the project code on XP.
2. Develop the project to run on Linux, XP, and 98SE/WinME.
(Later for porting to MacOS)
3. Develop the project to have a "common look and feel" between
platforms.

My requirements are as follows:
1. I need a compiler and development environment that is free and
unrestrictive with respect to liscensing and royalties.

2. I need graphics tool kit that is cross platform, and also free.

3. I also want to be able to target multiple OSes for the same processor
type.


See http://upp.sf.net

Mirek
Oct 2 '05 #19

P: n/a
"BobR" <Re***********@worldnet.att.net> writes:
Sherm Pendley wrote in message ...
Use VC++ on Windows, Xcode on Mac OS X, and
whatever on Linux.

Or, GCC for all. No $.
VC++'s "Express" editions are $cheap - the final release will be priced at
$49US. And the current beta releases are $free. Xcode is a free download,
and uses GCC under the hood anyway.
Why learn a new compiler for each system?
Why not? It's hardly rocket science, and by any objective measure I'm aware
of, VC++ produces better code than GCC - albeit only for the one platform for
which it produces any code at all. ;-\.
The choice is yours. Please make it an *informed* choice. :-}


Exactly. Instead of choosing out of a misguided religious attachment to a
single platform, take some time to inform yourself as to the relative merits
of each. Then for each platform choose the compiler that produces the best
results for it.

sherm--

--
Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
Hire me! My resume: http://www.dot-app.org
Oct 2 '05 #20

P: n/a
> Well, it's free, but absence of a debugger (and the IDE) is a bummer.
Perhaps I am biased (or spoiled) because I've been using QuickC and
Visual C++ for more than a decade, and they come with all you need, but
you gotta buy those amenities. To have a debugger really takes the
prize. Inserting printf's all over code just to see what's going on
is not only tedious, it changes the behaviour of the code, and therefore
you don't get the right picture... Of course you could try using some
other debugger... If you can find something decent, that is.


I believe that TheIDE of Ultimate++ contains pretty good and fast .pdb
debugger:

http://upp.sourceforge.net/www$screenshots$en-us.html_3.png

Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 is one of supported compilers, although you need
some effort to fix the problem with missing runtime libraries
(description of process is included).

Mirek
Oct 3 '05 #21

P: n/a
BobR wrote:
Sherm Pendley wrote in message ...
"BobR" <Re***********@worldnet.att.net> writes:

Will VC++ run on a GNU/Linux OS? Or a Mac OS?


Obviously not, but who cares?

Someone who is developing on all three systems!

Use VC++ on Windows, Xcode on Mac OS X, and
whatever on Linux.
--
sherm--

Or, GCC for all. No $. Why learn a new compiler for each system?


Because VC++ compiles 3 times faster and produces shorter and faster
executables? And is free as well?

Mirek
Oct 3 '05 #22

P: n/a
Sherm Pendley wrote:
"BobR" <Re***********@worldnet.att.net> writes:

Sherm Pendley wrote in message ...


Use VC++ on Windows, Xcode on Mac OS X, and
whatever on Linux.


Or, GCC for all. No $.

VC++'s "Express" editions are $cheap - the final release will be priced at
$49US.


AFAIK I believe it is even better - recently they have decided that it
will be free download.

In any case, you can download BETA now and commandline compiler does not
require registration.

Mirek
Oct 3 '05 #23

P: n/a
On Mon, 03 Oct 2005 13:24:31 +0200, Mirek Fidler <cx*@volny.cz> wrote:
Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 is one of supported compilers, although you need
some effort to fix the problem with missing runtime libraries
(description of process is included).

^^^^^^^^^^^

I looked all over the web site for this information, but couldn't find
it. Could you post a direct link, please?

--
Bob Hairgrove
No**********@Home.com
Oct 3 '05 #24

P: n/a
Bob Hairgrove wrote:
On Mon, 03 Oct 2005 13:24:31 +0200, Mirek Fidler <cx*@volny.cz> wrote:

Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 is one of supported compilers, although you need
some effort to fix the problem with missing runtime libraries
(description of process is included).


^^^^^^^^^^^

I looked all over the web site for this information, but couldn't find
it. Could you post a direct link, please?


Actually, you get the installation guide with download (that is quirk,
it should have been on website). Anyway, the content is this:

Microsoft® Visual C++™ Toolkit 2003

Visual C++ Toolkit is a little bit more tricky, because you have to
download and install three different parts:

Visual C++ Toolkit itself:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/visualc/vctoolkit2003/

Microsoft Win32 SDK (installing minimum 32bit core is all you need):

http://www.microsoft.com/msdownload/...ate/update.htm

And finally, there is missing cvtres.exe utility in Visual C++ Toolkit,
you can download it here:

http://support.microsoft.com/default...;en-us;q187280

and then please unpack and install to the bin directory of toolkit.
TheIDE should then detect all required directories and setup build methods.

Mirek
Oct 3 '05 #25

P: n/a
On Mon, 03 Oct 2005 14:10:11 +0200, Mirek Fidler <cx*@volny.cz> wrote:
missing runtime libraries


I see ... you mean the Platform SDK libraries, not the CRT dll's with
import libraries. That is the BIG drawback about the MSVC++ toolkit,
that all the CRT *.LIB files are static libraries. Makes for big
problems (memory management, STL) when your application uses DLLs.

Thanks.

--
Bob Hairgrove
No**********@Home.com
Oct 3 '05 #26

P: n/a
Bob Hairgrove wrote:
On Mon, 03 Oct 2005 14:10:11 +0200, Mirek Fidler <cx*@volny.cz> wrote:

missing runtime libraries

I see ... you mean the Platform SDK libraries, not the CRT dll's with
import libraries. That is the BIG drawback about the MSVC++ toolkit,
that all the CRT *.LIB files are static libraries. Makes for big
problems (memory management, STL) when your application uses DLLs.


Right... Well I have tried to search for solution there, some those libs
can be separately downloaded, but in general you are right.

Anyway, current Visual C++ Express Beta 2 is "working equivalent" of
VC++ Toolkit 2003 - you can install command-line compiler only and all
of those missing items are there. For free....

Mirek
Oct 3 '05 #27

P: n/a
Jed

I want to thank all of you for taking the time to reply with your
experience and wisdom in this matter!

It looks like I'm going to choose GCC for now, and work with wxWidgets.

I liked the look of their graphics, but this doesn't mean I am going to
lock down on these tools permanently. They will definitely do (from
initial appearances) for the current projects I want to work on.

I won't rule out VC++, but I won't be using it for now.

My past C++ compiler experiences are MS Quick C, Turbo C++, Borland C++
4, and 5, Builder, and Visual C++ 6 educational edition.

IDEs can spoil you. I realize they can also make you more productive.
But, I don't have a problem using a text editor and writing batch files
for doing compilation and builds. Most of the Open Source tools I've
looked at lean in that direction. No problem.

My intention is develop my applications using standard C++. This will
also give me experience using templates and a few other features that
I've not had the opportunity to work with. Lots of goals, lots of ideas
and now I just need to get to work.

Again, Thank you all! :)

Best of coding to you all!

I will be posting this in both the moderated and non-moderated C++
newsgroups!

Sincerly,

Jed
[Do or do not, there is not try.]

Obviously Yoda didn't program in C++ or Java...
Oct 5 '05 #28

P: n/a
Duane Hebert wrote:
"Jed" <je*@theforge.com> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@207.217. 125.201...
I take it that it is not free? Not seeing anything about that anywhere on
their site..


With Qt4 Trolltech has released an open source version for
Windows, as well as Linux. I think the windows version only
runs with Cygwin though. It's a good product, although a bit
expensive for the commercial version if you're a single
developer.


There is a version of Qt based off the GPLed 3.x version available,
which does not require Cygwin. Rather cool to say the least.

http://kde-cygwin.sourceforge.net/qt...mpile-msvc.php

Yes, Qt is expensive. But that is manager-speak. What management does
not realize, is that having a proper tool more than makes up the cost,
especially the more coding/development you are doing. There is a
saying, "If I had to cut down a tree in 9 hours, I would spend 6 hours
sharpening my ax." I like add: "Or by a proper chain saw and cut it
down in 1 hour."

I use both open source and commercial tools. Many open source tools
are excellent, however sometimes commercial tools are better. In the
Java world, many folks swear by IntelliJ
(http://www.jetbrains.com/idea/), which is rougly $500 more than
Eclipse (http://www.eclipse.org), and yet people think it's worth it.

-Mike

Oct 16 '05 #29

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