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C# "expert" in two weeks

P: n/a
Ok, first lets start with some definitions:

By "Expert", I mean someone who :

1). Is familiar with and understands the *MAJOR* concepts/philosopies
underlying C# (and possible .Net as a whole - over and above CLI, CTS etc)

2). Knows which libraries to use for common and maybe not so common tasks

3). Can convincingly pass a C# technical interview (without having
studied the answers by rote)
Now, my background

I have several years experience as a software architect:

1). I have 6 years C++ (including "policy based" meta-template
programming ala Alexandrou, design patterns etc)
2). I have 1.5 years Java experience (J2EE - but this was from about 4
years ago
3). I have about a years experience of C# (v1 IIRC) - this again was
about 4 years ago.
4). Other miscellaeous programming languages (not relevant here)
Finally, the Task
==============================
I am applying for a Job as a C# contractor. Naturally, I feel I may be a
little rusty, and I need to get myself up to speed as quickly as
possible - hence the title "C# 'expert' in two weeks".

My question, is what is the quickest route (i.e. online materials, best
practises, tips etc) to get myself to the "Expert" status (as per *MY*
definition of expert given above?)

I look forward especially, to fellow contractors out there who can tell
me what to expect etc, and how to make this transition. Thanks
Jul 2 '08 #1
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11 Replies


P: n/a
Neo Morpheous <bl*******@ursa-major.comwrote:
Finally, the Task
==============================
I am applying for a Job as a C# contractor. Naturally, I feel I may be a
little rusty, and I need to get myself up to speed as quickly as
possible - hence the title "C# 'expert' in two weeks".

My question, is what is the quickest route (i.e. online materials, best
practises, tips etc) to get myself to the "Expert" status (as per *MY*
definition of expert given above?)

I look forward especially, to fellow contractors out there who can tell
me what to expect etc, and how to make this transition. Thanks
Well, apart from anything else I'd hesitate to call anyone an "expert"
who has brushed up their skills rather than having experience. However,
with the definition you've given, here are a couple of recommendations:

My own book, "C# in Depth", goes through the changes from C# 1 to 2 and
3. It assumes you already know C# 1 (so its applicability depends on
just how rusty you are on C# 1). It may be in more depth than you're
after... not sure. However, it pretty much only covers the language.
Obviously I'm biased in recommending this :)

For the core .NET libraries, C# 3.0 in a Nutshell is excellent. It
avoids spending time on ASP.NET, WinForms, WPF etc and focuses on the
core of the framework. Unless you already know which "periphery"
technologies you'll be using, I wouldn't worry about studying them at
the moment - you haven't got time to become comfortable in everything
in the space of two weeks.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
Web site: http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon_skeet
C# in Depth: http://csharpindepth.com
Jul 2 '08 #2

P: n/a
On 2 Jul, 12:17, Jon Skeet [C# MVP] <sk...@pobox.comwrote:
Neo Morpheous <bluebp...@ursa-major.comwrote:
Finally, the Task
==============================
I am applying for a Job as a C# contractor. Naturally, I feel I may be a
little rusty, and I need to get myself up to speed as quickly as
possible - hence the title "C# 'expert' in two weeks".
My question, is what is the quickest route (i.e. online materials, best
practises, tips etc) to get myself to the "Expert" status (as per *MY*
definition of expert given above?)
I look forward especially, to fellow contractors out there who can tell
me what to expect etc, and how to make this transition. Thanks

Well, apart from anything else I'd hesitate to call anyone an "expert"
who has brushed up their skills rather than having experience. However,
with the definition you've given, here are a couple of recommendations:

My own book, "C# in Depth", goes through the changes from C# 1 to 2 and
3. It assumes you already know C# 1 (so its applicability depends on
just how rusty you are on C# 1). It may be in more depth than you're
after... not sure. However, it pretty much only covers the language.
Obviously I'm biased in recommending this :)

For the core .NET libraries, C# 3.0 in a Nutshell is excellent. It
avoids spending time on ASP.NET, WinForms, WPF etc and focuses on the
core of the framework. Unless you already know which "periphery"
technologies you'll be using, I wouldn't worry about studying them at
the moment - you haven't got time to become comfortable in everything
in the space of two weeks.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk...@pobox.com>
Web site:http://www.pobox.com/~skeet*
Blog:http://www.msmvps.com/jon_skeet
C# in Depth:http://csharpindepth.com
Hey Jon, aren't a Java programmer now ? :)
Jul 2 '08 #3

P: n/a
<pu****@googlemail.comwrote:
Hey Jon, aren't a Java programmer now ? :)
Yup - C# has become a "spare time" thing instead of a direct
professional interest (authoring aside). For the moment, at least... I
would be surprised if I never wrote any more professional C# though :)

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
Web site: http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon_skeet
C# in Depth: http://csharpindepth.com
Jul 2 '08 #4

P: n/a
Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
Yup - C# has become a "spare time" thing instead of a direct
professional interest (authoring aside).
Sorry Jon, would it be rude of me to ask you why?

--
Thank you,

Christopher Ireland

"When I was 10, my pa told me never to talk to strangers. We haven't spoken
since."
Steven Wright
Jul 2 '08 #5

P: n/a
Christopher Ireland <ci******@gmail.comwrote:
Yup - C# has become a "spare time" thing instead of a direct
professional interest (authoring aside).

Sorry Jon, would it be rude of me to ask you why?
Because you don't say "no" to an offer to work at Google :)

I still prefer C# to Java as a language, but Google is a truly fabulous
place to work.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
Web site: http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon_skeet
C# in Depth: http://csharpindepth.com
Jul 2 '08 #6

P: n/a
Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
Because you don't say "no" to an offer to work at Google :)
Ah, I didn't know. Many congratulations! From the work you've put into this
forum I should say that you fully deserve the opportunity!
I still prefer C# to Java as a language, but Google is a truly
fabulous place to work.
I'm sure it is. GooglePlexes look kinda ... funky ;-)

--
Thank you,

Christopher Ireland

"Western science is a major response to minor needs."
Mattheiu Ricard
Jul 2 '08 #7

P: n/a
Christopher Ireland <ci******@gmail.comwrote:
Because you don't say "no" to an offer to work at Google :)

Ah, I didn't know. Many congratulations! From the work you've put into this
forum I should say that you fully deserve the opportunity!
Thanks. It's quite daunting to be in an office where everyone is
smarter than me and most are younger than me, but boy is it fun :)
I still prefer C# to Java as a language, but Google is a truly
fabulous place to work.

I'm sure it is. GooglePlexes look kinda ... funky ;-)
Oh yes. My waistline is beginning to feel the strain though...

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
Web site: http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon_skeet
C# in Depth: http://csharpindepth.com
Jul 2 '08 #8

P: n/a
Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
Thanks. It's quite daunting to be in an office where everyone is
smarter than me and most are younger than me, but boy is it fun :)
I'm glad to hear it! Getting to be with people younger and smarter than you
has no merit though ... as Groucho Marx once said, "Anyone can get old. All
you have to do is live long enough." ;-)
Oh yes. My waistline is beginning to feel the strain though...
I sympathise. I'm sure mine would as well. Oh well, a small price to pay :-)

--
Thank you,

Christopher Ireland

"Work out your own salvation. Do not depend on others."
Siddhartha Gautama
Jul 2 '08 #9

P: n/a
Neo Morpheous wrote:
Ok, first lets start with some definitions:

By "Expert", I mean someone who :

1). Is familiar with and understands the *MAJOR* concepts/philosopies
underlying C# (and possible .Net as a whole - over and above CLI, CTS etc)

2). Knows which libraries to use for common and maybe not so common tasks

3). Can convincingly pass a C# technical interview (without having
studied the answers by rote)

Now, my background

I have several years experience as a software architect:

1). I have 6 years C++ (including "policy based" meta-template
programming ala Alexandrou, design patterns etc)
2). I have 1.5 years Java experience (J2EE - but this was from about 4
years ago
3). I have about a years experience of C# (v1 IIRC) - this again was
about 4 years ago.
4). Other miscellaeous programming languages (not relevant here)

Finally, the Task
==============================
I am applying for a Job as a C# contractor. Naturally, I feel I may be a
little rusty, and I need to get myself up to speed as quickly as
possible - hence the title "C# 'expert' in two weeks".

My question, is what is the quickest route (i.e. online materials, best
practises, tips etc) to get myself to the "Expert" status (as per *MY*
definition of expert given above?)

I look forward especially, to fellow contractors out there who can tell
me what to expect etc, and how to make this transition. Thanks
If it is a short term contract then I think you should pass on it. It
will not be satisfactory for neither you or the project.

If it is a long term contract then I will recommend:
- go for it
- read some stuff about C# and .NET
- be completely honest at the interview
- if you get the job then learn as you go

The approach is not as bad as it sounds. Figuring out what the
code should do exactly is the hard part. You can do that with
your experience. The C# syntax and the .NET libraries are complex,
but still much easier.

I would suggest a plan like:
* find a book or detailed web resource about .NET architecture to get
the context
* find a book that covers the important topics for an experienced
developer with no (or limited) C#/.NET experience - I will suggest
Professional C# by Wrox and read through that before the interview
* create a few interesting apps using that knowledge before the
interview
* if you get the job then get some more detailed books to use as
reference, Jon Skeets book, specialized books in ASP.NET or WCF
depending on what you will be working with

Arne
Jul 3 '08 #10

P: n/a
I would suggest a plan like:
* find a book or detailed web resource about .NET architecture to get
the context
* find a book that covers the important topics for an experienced
developer with no (or limited) C#/.NET experience - I will suggest
Professional C# by Wrox and read through that before the interview
* create a few interesting apps using that knowledge before the
interview
* if you get the job then get some more detailed books to use as
reference, Jon Skeets book, specialized books in ASP.NET or WCF
depending on what you will be working with
Hi,

I am also start learning C# (I have only 9 months of C# development
experience from scratch when I started a new project developed myself in my
previous company).
I have the book Professional C# 2005, this book seems assume you have
experience in C# before, will it be more appropriate if start by reading a
Beginning C#... by Wrox?
Please advise.
Jul 10 '08 #11

P: n/a
Man T wrote:
>I would suggest a plan like:
* find a book or detailed web resource about .NET architecture to get
the context
* find a book that covers the important topics for an experienced
developer with no (or limited) C#/.NET experience - I will suggest
Professional C# by Wrox and read through that before the interview
* create a few interesting apps using that knowledge before the
interview
* if you get the job then get some more detailed books to use as
reference, Jon Skeets book, specialized books in ASP.NET or WCF
depending on what you will be working with

I am also start learning C# (I have only 9 months of C# development
experience from scratch when I started a new project developed myself in my
previous company).
I have the book Professional C# 2005, this book seems assume you have
experience in C# before, will it be more appropriate if start by reading a
Beginning C#... by Wrox?
If you have been working with C# for 9 months and have an IT education,
then I believe that you will benefit more by studying "Professional ..."
than "Beginning ...".

Read it slowly and make some example code while reading.

Arne
Jul 10 '08 #12

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