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Sequential one request at a time processing

ASP.NET processes one request at a time, sequentially. If one process
blocks or sleeps then it brings down the entire application for all
users.

This fact is hidden under the rug by Microsoft. It would clearly be a
problem for any website that has tons of traffic.

On this I seek specifics.

Is it sequential per DLL or per page? If one page blocks, on say a big
database query, will other pages process and respond?

On a multi-processor server, say with four processors, is this still a
problem? Or will each processor be independent of eachother?

How does this sequential processing scale to a web farm or garden?

Thanks for your help.
Nov 18 '05 #1
2 1518
asp.net does not process pages sequential, it can currenlty process as many
requests as the thread pool size. if your pages are processing sequentialy,
then you have put code on your pages that blocks.

-- bruce (sqlwork.com)


"Bruce W.1" <no@direct.email> wrote in message
news:40***************@direct.email...
ASP.NET processes one request at a time, sequentially. If one process
blocks or sleeps then it brings down the entire application for all
users.

This fact is hidden under the rug by Microsoft. It would clearly be a
problem for any website that has tons of traffic.

On this I seek specifics.

Is it sequential per DLL or per page? If one page blocks, on say a big
database query, will other pages process and respond?

On a multi-processor server, say with four processors, is this still a
problem? Or will each processor be independent of eachother?

How does this sequential processing scale to a web farm or garden?

Thanks for your help.

Nov 18 '05 #2
bruce barker wrote:

asp.net does not process pages sequential, it can currenlty process as many
requests as the thread pool size. if your pages are processing sequentialy,
then you have put code on your pages that blocks.

-- bruce (sqlwork.com)

================================================== ======

Wrong. Test it yourself.

When a page blocks, for whatever reason, other requests to the page are
not processed.
Nov 18 '05 #3

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