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what is postback?

P: n/a
I always see the term "postback" from ASP book, but I am not sure if I fully
understand the meaning. Here's my understanding so far, please correct me if
any mistakes.

Here's a typical html form:
<form action="process.asp" method="post">
'GUI code
</form>

"postback" action happens when the user click the submit button, that means
it will invoke "process.asp" is the above code.

In ASP.NET, if the web control has set AutoPostBack property to True, that
means when there is any events on the web control, it will invoke
"process.asp", just like the user click the submit button.

Please advise. Thanks!

Jul 19 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
it just means what you're essentially doing when submitting the form is
coming back to the same script that displays the form, which then
carries out actions based on what's been submitted, whether that's
adding to a database, processing something or just displaying a
validation error.

it's got a more specific meaning in ASP.NET but you seem to have that
handled...


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Jul 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Wed, 29 Oct 2003 22:22:00 -0800, "Matt" <ma*******@hotmail.com>
wrote:
I always see the term "postback" from ASP book, but I am not sure if I fully
understand the meaning. Here's my understanding so far, please correct me if
any mistakes.

Here's a typical html form:
<form action="process.asp" method="post">
'GUI code
</form>

"postback" action happens when the user click the submit button, that means
it will invoke "process.asp" is the above code.

In ASP.NET, if the web control has set AutoPostBack property to True, that
means when there is any events on the web control, it will invoke
"process.asp", just like the user click the submit button.


Basically the same. Postback just means that when the form is
submitted, the same script that created the form does the processing.
So in your case, the file would be process.asp, and when submitted,
the form would pass the values to process.asp, invoking itself again.

Jeff
Jul 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
In addition to the other posts, be aware that a postback is not the same
thing as a refresh. In other words, a postback does not just represent the
second (or subsequent) time the page is being loaded. A postback represents
just what its name says: a post-back of data to the server.

Usually, a submit button causes a postback, but as you've pointed out, many
controls have an "AutoPostBack" property which, when set to true, make using
that particular control act as if it was a submit button.
"Matt" <ma*******@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
I always see the term "postback" from ASP book, but I am not sure if I fully understand the meaning. Here's my understanding so far, please correct me if any mistakes.

Here's a typical html form:
<form action="process.asp" method="post">
'GUI code
</form>

"postback" action happens when the user click the submit button, that means it will invoke "process.asp" is the above code.

In ASP.NET, if the web control has set AutoPostBack property to True, that
means when there is any events on the web control, it will invoke
"process.asp", just like the user click the submit button.

Please advise. Thanks!


Jul 19 '05 #4

P: n/a
Let's use the example and assume this is in process.asp
Here's a typical html form:
<form action="process.asp" method="post">
'GUI code
</form>
When we click the submit button, the form will send the data in web control
to the server, and then call "process.asp." Since the form is in
process.asp, and "process.asp" is the form to call, so it makes us think the
page is being loaded again, or have the same effect as refresh the page. The
smart navigation property is to prevent the page from blinking?

Please advise! Thanks!

"Scott M." <s-***@badspamsnet.net> wrote in message
news:eI**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
In addition to the other posts, be aware that a postback is not the same
thing as a refresh. In other words, a postback does not just represent the second (or subsequent) time the page is being loaded. A postback represents just what its name says: a post-back of data to the server.

Usually, a submit button causes a postback, but as you've pointed out, many controls have an "AutoPostBack" property which, when set to true, make using that particular control act as if it was a submit button.
"Matt" <ma*******@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
I always see the term "postback" from ASP book, but I am not sure if I fully
understand the meaning. Here's my understanding so far, please correct

me if
any mistakes.

Here's a typical html form:
<form action="process.asp" method="post">
'GUI code
</form>

"postback" action happens when the user click the submit button, that

means
it will invoke "process.asp" is the above code.

In ASP.NET, if the web control has set AutoPostBack property to True,

that means when there is any events on the web control, it will invoke
"process.asp", just like the user click the submit button.

Please advise. Thanks!



Jul 19 '05 #5

P: n/a
"Matthew Louden" <jr********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:O1**************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Let's use the example and assume this is in process.asp
Here's a typical html form:
<form action="process.asp" method="post">
Actually, the line would look like this:

<form method="post" runat="server">

Since, ASP.NET forms are server-side forms and server-side forms MUST submit
to themselves (even if you put Action="someOtherPage.aspx", it will
disregard that and submit to itself).
'GUI code
</form>
When we click the submit button, the form will send the data in web control to the server, and then call "process.asp." Since the form is in
process.asp, and "process.asp" is the form to call, so it makes us think the page is being loaded again, or have the same effect as refresh the page.
The page is being loaded again, but this time it has form data to extract
and process with. Under this circumstance, this page load is called a
"PostBack". A page refresh does not always cause the page to be rebuilt as
a "PostBack".
The smart navigation property is to prevent the page from blinking?
SmartNavigation causes the page to reload to the scrolled position it was in
during the last page render.

Please advise! Thanks!

"Scott M." <s-***@badspamsnet.net> wrote in message
news:eI**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
In addition to the other posts, be aware that a postback is not the same
thing as a refresh. In other words, a postback does not just represent

the
second (or subsequent) time the page is being loaded. A postback

represents
just what its name says: a post-back of data to the server.

Usually, a submit button causes a postback, but as you've pointed out,

many
controls have an "AutoPostBack" property which, when set to true, make

using
that particular control act as if it was a submit button.
"Matt" <ma*******@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
I always see the term "postback" from ASP book, but I am not sure if I

fully
understand the meaning. Here's my understanding so far, please correct

me
if
any mistakes.

Here's a typical html form:
<form action="process.asp" method="post">
'GUI code
</form>

"postback" action happens when the user click the submit button, that

means
it will invoke "process.asp" is the above code.

In ASP.NET, if the web control has set AutoPostBack property to True,

that means when there is any events on the web control, it will invoke
"process.asp", just like the user click the submit button.

Please advise. Thanks!




Jul 19 '05 #6

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