By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
424,510 Members | 1,437 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 424,510 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

How often to automatically compact & repair a replicated database

P: n/a
For those of you that have replicated databases, how often to you
compact and repair them?

Also what mathod do you use if you do this on an automated way?

How do you make sure that the automated process is successful and if
not, what process of notification is used?

Bob
Aug 7 '08 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
4 Replies


P: n/a
Bob Alston <bo********@yahoo.comwrote in
news:X7*****************@newsfe03.iad:
For those of you that have replicated databases, how often to you
compact and repair them?
As often as you'd compact and repair and non-replicated MDB.
Also what mathod do you use if you do this on an automated way?
A scheduled VBScript on a server? FMS Agent?
How do you make sure that the automated process is successful and
if not, what process of notification is used?
Something like FMS Agent takes care of all that for you, but it's
expensive, of course.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Aug 8 '08 #2

P: n/a
What you really need to understand is that C & R is one of those paradoxes
that seem to permeate Access. A function that one would think is, at least
partially, meant to decrease the chance of corruption, actually is a frequent
cause of corruption! Because of this, C&R should never be done until a backup
copy of the db has been made.

--
There's ALWAYS more than one way to skin a cat!

Answers/posts based on Access 2000/2003

Message posted via AccessMonster.com
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200808/1

Aug 9 '08 #3

P: n/a
"Linq Adams via AccessMonster.com" <u28780@uwewrote:
>What you really need to understand is that C & R is one of those paradoxes
that seem to permeate Access. A function that one would think is, at least
partially, meant to decrease the chance of corruption, actually is a frequent
cause of corruption!
I disagree. I suspect compact and repair is bringing previous corruption to your
attention.
>Because of this, C&R should never be done until a backup
copy of the db has been made.
Absolutely agreed.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Tony's Microsoft Access Blog - http://msmvps.com/blogs/access/
Aug 10 '08 #4

P: n/a

"Linq Adams via AccessMonster.com" <u28780@uwewrote in message
news:88635c4d96834@uwe...
What you really need to understand is that C & R is one of those paradoxes
that seem to permeate Access. A function that one would think is, at least
partially, meant to decrease the chance of corruption, actually is a
frequent
cause of corruption! Because of this, C&R should never be done until a
backup
copy of the db has been made.
It's an interesting thing. I have used Access daily since I got my first
copy of V. 1.0 early in January of 1993, and I have never experienced
corruption due to Compact and/or Repair. Compact and Repair, unless you go
out of your way to force it to overwrite, reads the existing database and
creates a new one, AFAIK.

Given this and that I never had a corruption, I (almost) never make a backup
before compacting, but use the Compact-from database as my backup. On the
other hand, I backup usually every hour or so of development, so for the
databases I most work with, I have plenty of backup copies lying around.
Now, if the next time I do C&R, it corrupts the Compact-from database,
you'll hear my screams all the way to wherever you are!

Larry Linson
Microsoft Office Access MVP
Aug 12 '08 #5

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.