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How to search for a question-mark in an open table with CTRL-F?

P: n/a
MLH
I'm sure its a bozo question, but it's got me stumped.

How do I search for a question mark in an open table
using CTRL-F to launch the search in the current field.
The field is a text field. Not all records have a "?" in
the field, but some do.

The search process treats the question-mark as a
wildcard character and finds the occurrence in EVERY
record. Hmmm??? Is there no way to specify a Chr$(63)
to the CTRL-F search process?
Mar 28 '07 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
On Wed, 28 Mar 2007 11:26:57 -0400, MLH wrote:
I'm sure its a bozo question, but it's got me stumped.

How do I search for a question mark in an open table
using CTRL-F to launch the search in the current field.
The field is a text field. Not all records have a "?" in
the field, but some do.

The search process treats the question-mark as a
wildcard character and finds the occurrence in EVERY
record. Hmmm??? Is there no way to specify a Chr$(63)
to the CTRL-F search process?
Place it within brackets.
[?]
--
Fred
Please respond only to this newsgroup.
I do not reply to personal e-mail
Mar 28 '07 #2

P: n/a
MLH
Obviously, that was a guess.
Try it out & you'll see what happens -
or, rather, what does not happen.
Mar 30 '07 #3

P: n/a
On Fri, 30 Mar 2007 00:20:27 -0400, MLH wrote:
Obviously, that was a guess.
Try it out & you'll see what happens -
or, rather, what does not happen.
No it wasn't a guess! And quite the contrary, I did try it then (to
make sure my memory was correct), and I just now tried it again.

To search a field for a question mark, such as "Smith?" enter [?] and
set the Look In to either the table or a specific field, then set
Match to Any Part of the Field and it will find just those records
that include a question mark within any part of the field.

The same applies to searching for # and *.

--
Fred
Please respond only to this newsgroup.
I do not reply to personal e-mail
Mar 30 '07 #4

P: n/a
MLH
Oh man. Well that's a bummer.
I'm using A97 and my results are
negative. That is, the only way
it finds the 3-chars quoted here
"[?]"
is if there is a left-square question
right-square in one of the fields.
Apr 1 '07 #5

P: n/a
Try 'search as formatted'

Arno R

"MLH" <CR**@NorthState.netschreef in bericht news:kj********************************@4ax.com...
Oh man. Well that's a bummer.
I'm using A97 and my results are
negative. That is, the only way
it finds the 3-chars quoted here
"[?]"
is if there is a left-square question
right-square in one of the fields.
Apr 1 '07 #6

P: n/a
DDB
MLH <CR**@NorthState.netwrote in
news:2u********************************@4ax.com:
Obviously, that was a guess.
Try it out & you'll see what happens -
or, rather, what does not happen.
Obviously?

From Access 97 Help

When using wildcard characters to search for an asterisk (*), question
mark (?), number sign (#), opening bracket ([), or hyphen (-), you must
enclose the item you're searching for in brackets. For example, to search
for a question mark, type [?] in the Find dialog box. If you're searching
for a hyphen and other characters simultaneously, place the hyphen before
or after all the other characters inside the brackets. (However, if you
have an exclamation point (!) after the opening bracket, place the hyphen
after the exclamation point.) If you're searching for an exclamation point
(!) or closing bracket (]), you don't need to enclose it in brackets.

Obviously (note gentle irony rather than harsh sarcasm) you didn't read the
Help, didn't put any care into your test, and ignored fredg.

For what it's worth, on my test [?] found any question mark with or without
"Search Fields as Formatted" selected. However, my test table had no blanks
or Nulls.

I and perhaps others would be interested to know why your results differed.

DDB
(I'm much nicer than I sound.)
May 13 '07 #7

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