By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
424,680 Members | 1,500 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 424,680 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Totally confused about Access 2003 Runtime availability!

P: n/a
Ok I have searched the MS website for info on this. I am totally
confused.

If I want to deploy an Access 2003 app and allow my users to run it
using Access 2003 Runtime, where do I get the Runtime?

I just purchased Office 2003 Professional. Is Access 2003 Runtime
included with that or not?

It APPEARS that the only way I can get Access 2003 Runtime is to
purchase Microsoft Visual Studio. Is that correct? If so, I am
screwed big time.

So, this leaves me with another question: If I leave our Access 2000
app in 2000 format, avoid use Access 2003 to continue development and
upgrades but avoid incorporating any Access 2003 specific features,
will my users be able to continue using Access 2000 Runtime to run the
app?

All help much appreciated.

-LW
Nov 13 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
10 Replies


P: n/a
I'm not surprised you're confused - it's confusing.

Currently the only way to get your hands on the Access 2003 run-time
executable is on the Office Professional 2003 CD. There's an install file and
a cab file hidden in a folder somewhere like English\ACCRT. That's the file,
but not the permission to deploy it. For permission to deploy, you need to
purchase the "Microsoft Visual Studio Tools for the Microsoft Office System".

So, in a nutshell - to deploy an Access 2003 Runtime application, you must own
both Office Professional 2003 (or just Access 2003) and the "Microsoft Visual
Studio Tools for the Microsoft Office System".

Yes, they probably could have thought of a shorter name - I guess we could
always call it MSVSTFTMOS for short. Hey - TANSTAAFL.

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 00:58:50 -0500, Lauren Wilson <pr*****@private.com> wrote:
Ok I have searched the MS website for info on this. I am totally
confused.

If I want to deploy an Access 2003 app and allow my users to run it
using Access 2003 Runtime, where do I get the Runtime?

I just purchased Office 2003 Professional. Is Access 2003 Runtime
included with that or not?

It APPEARS that the only way I can get Access 2003 Runtime is to
purchase Microsoft Visual Studio. Is that correct? If so, I am
screwed big time.

So, this leaves me with another question: If I leave our Access 2000
app in 2000 format, avoid use Access 2003 to continue development and
upgrades but avoid incorporating any Access 2003 specific features,
will my users be able to continue using Access 2000 Runtime to run the
app?

All help much appreciated.

-LW


Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
ng
Well that bites. That runtime thing is the basis of *ALL* the applications
in our organization. What do you do? Just go with the flow and quit
developing in access, and start developing in VB straight-up? Access has
some real advantages as far as ease of use for my users, they don't have to
know SQL or anything. It's good for me, I develop in it, I know they can't
get in there and screw with it. I know they couldn't with a compiled VB app
either, but that isn't the point. I'm just used to doing it this way, and I
don't see why Microsoft has to go tacking more costly stuff on top of what
we already need. To Microsoft, the megolith, More is More, to me, the
humble programmer with limited resources, Less is More!

Anything I wanted to do I could have done with Access 97. maybe we should
have stayed there!

-B

"Steve Jorgensen" <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:2h********************************@4ax.com...
I'm not surprised you're confused - it's confusing.

Currently the only way to get your hands on the Access 2003 run-time
executable is on the Office Professional 2003 CD. There's an install file
and
a cab file hidden in a folder somewhere like English\ACCRT. That's the
file,
but not the permission to deploy it. For permission to deploy, you need
to
purchase the "Microsoft Visual Studio Tools for the Microsoft Office
System".

So, in a nutshell - to deploy an Access 2003 Runtime application, you must
own
both Office Professional 2003 (or just Access 2003) and the "Microsoft
Visual
Studio Tools for the Microsoft Office System".

Yes, they probably could have thought of a shorter name - I guess we could
always call it MSVSTFTMOS for short. Hey - TANSTAAFL.

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 00:58:50 -0500, Lauren Wilson <pr*****@private.com>
wrote:
Ok I have searched the MS website for info on this. I am totally
confused.

If I want to deploy an Access 2003 app and allow my users to run it
using Access 2003 Runtime, where do I get the Runtime?

I just purchased Office 2003 Professional. Is Access 2003 Runtime
included with that or not?

It APPEARS that the only way I can get Access 2003 Runtime is to
purchase Microsoft Visual Studio. Is that correct? If so, I am
screwed big time.

So, this leaves me with another question: If I leave our Access 2000
app in 2000 format, avoid use Access 2003 to continue development and
upgrades but avoid incorporating any Access 2003 specific features,
will my users be able to continue using Access 2000 Runtime to run the
app?

All help much appreciated.

-LW

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
I don't understand your concern.

Access 2003 HAS a runtime. As Steve pointed out, you need to purchase the
following in order to create an Access 2003 runtime application:

- Microsoft Access 2003
- Visual Studio Tools for Office 2003 (which includes the Access 2003
Developer Extensions)

The ADE is the product that gives you the license to deploy the 2003 runtime
components and you have to have Access 2003 installed in order to install
the ADE.

If you're using MSDN, note that while VSTO is available in all subscription
levels of MSDN, the Access Developer Extensions are not included with all
versions. ADE is only available at Universal level.

The stand-alone VSTO box includes both VSTO and the ADE.

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/of...ficetools.aspx for more
details
--
Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
http://I.Am/DougSteele
(no e-mails, please!)

"ng" <ng@ng.com> wrote in message news:Row6e.9719$H_5.9459@trnddc01...
Well that bites. That runtime thing is the basis of *ALL* the
applications in our organization. What do you do? Just go with the flow
and quit developing in access, and start developing in VB straight-up?
Access has some real advantages as far as ease of use for my users, they
don't have to know SQL or anything. It's good for me, I develop in it, I
know they can't get in there and screw with it. I know they couldn't with
a compiled VB app either, but that isn't the point. I'm just used to
doing it this way, and I don't see why Microsoft has to go tacking more
costly stuff on top of what we already need. To Microsoft, the megolith,
More is More, to me, the humble programmer with limited resources, Less is
More!

Anything I wanted to do I could have done with Access 97. maybe we should
have stayed there!

-B

"Steve Jorgensen" <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:2h********************************@4ax.com...
I'm not surprised you're confused - it's confusing.

Currently the only way to get your hands on the Access 2003 run-time
executable is on the Office Professional 2003 CD. There's an install
file and
a cab file hidden in a folder somewhere like English\ACCRT. That's the
file,
but not the permission to deploy it. For permission to deploy, you need
to
purchase the "Microsoft Visual Studio Tools for the Microsoft Office
System".

So, in a nutshell - to deploy an Access 2003 Runtime application, you
must own
both Office Professional 2003 (or just Access 2003) and the "Microsoft
Visual
Studio Tools for the Microsoft Office System".

Yes, they probably could have thought of a shorter name - I guess we
could
always call it MSVSTFTMOS for short. Hey - TANSTAAFL.

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 00:58:50 -0500, Lauren Wilson <pr*****@private.com>
wrote:
Ok I have searched the MS website for info on this. I am totally
confused.

If I want to deploy an Access 2003 app and allow my users to run it
using Access 2003 Runtime, where do I get the Runtime?

I just purchased Office 2003 Professional. Is Access 2003 Runtime
included with that or not?

It APPEARS that the only way I can get Access 2003 Runtime is to
purchase Microsoft Visual Studio. Is that correct? If so, I am
screwed big time.

So, this leaves me with another question: If I leave our Access 2000
app in 2000 format, avoid use Access 2003 to continue development and
upgrades but avoid incorporating any Access 2003 specific features,
will my users be able to continue using Access 2000 Runtime to run the
app?

All help much appreciated.

-LW


Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a

So, this STILL leaves me with another question: If I leave our Access
2000 app in 2000 format, use Access 2003 to continue development and
upgrades but avoid incorporating any Access 2003 specific features,
will my users be able to continue using Access 2000 Runtime to run the
app?


On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 19:24:56 -0400, "Douglas J. Steele"
<NOSPAM_djsteele@NOSPAM_canada.com> wrote:
I don't understand your concern.

Access 2003 HAS a runtime. As Steve pointed out, you need to purchase the
following in order to create an Access 2003 runtime application:

- Microsoft Access 2003
- Visual Studio Tools for Office 2003 (which includes the Access 2003
Developer Extensions)

The ADE is the product that gives you the license to deploy the 2003 runtime
components and you have to have Access 2003 installed in order to install
the ADE.

If you're using MSDN, note that while VSTO is available in all subscription
levels of MSDN, the Access Developer Extensions are not included with all
versions. ADE is only available at Universal level.

The stand-alone VSTO box includes both VSTO and the ADE.

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/of...ficetools.aspx for more
details


Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
Yes.

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 22:14:36 -0500, Lauren Wilson <pr*****@private.com> wrote:

So, this STILL leaves me with another question: If I leave our Access
2000 app in 2000 format, use Access 2003 to continue development and
upgrades but avoid incorporating any Access 2003 specific features,
will my users be able to continue using Access 2000 Runtime to run the
app?


On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 19:24:56 -0400, "Douglas J. Steele"
<NOSPAM_djsteele@NOSPAM_canada.com> wrote:
I don't understand your concern.

Access 2003 HAS a runtime. As Steve pointed out, you need to purchase the
following in order to create an Access 2003 runtime application:

- Microsoft Access 2003
- Visual Studio Tools for Office 2003 (which includes the Access 2003
Developer Extensions)

The ADE is the product that gives you the license to deploy the 2003 runtime
components and you have to have Access 2003 installed in order to install
the ADE.

If you're using MSDN, note that while VSTO is available in all subscription
levels of MSDN, the Access Developer Extensions are not included with all
versions. ADE is only available at Universal level.

The stand-alone VSTO box includes both VSTO and the ADE.

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/of...ficetools.aspx for more
details


Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
Br
Lauren Wilson wrote:
So, this STILL leaves me with another question: If I leave our Access
2000 app in 2000 format, use Access 2003 to continue development and
upgrades but avoid incorporating any Access 2003 specific features,
will my users be able to continue using Access 2000 Runtime to run the
app?


Yes, that should be fine.

Personally I've had problems with using A2003 to modify an A2000 ADP
application..... it keeps corrupting it on me :(

Br@dley
Nov 13 '05 #7

P: n/a
On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 03:52:58 GMT, "Br@dley" <no*****@4u.com> wrote:
Lauren Wilson wrote:
So, this STILL leaves me with another question: If I leave our Access
2000 app in 2000 format, use Access 2003 to continue development and
upgrades but avoid incorporating any Access 2003 specific features,
will my users be able to continue using Access 2000 Runtime to run the
app?


Yes, that should be fine.

Personally I've had problems with using A2003 to modify an A2000 ADP
application..... it keeps corrupting it on me :(

Br@dley


Make sure you're using the latest A2K3 service pack. It helps that problem
very noticeably.
Nov 13 '05 #8

P: n/a
Br
Steve Jorgensen wrote:
On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 03:52:58 GMT, "Br@dley" <no*****@4u.com> wrote:
Lauren Wilson wrote:
So, this STILL leaves me with another question: If I leave our
Access 2000 app in 2000 format, use Access 2003 to continue
development and upgrades but avoid incorporating any Access 2003
specific features, will my users be able to continue using Access
2000 Runtime to run the app?


Yes, that should be fine.

Personally I've had problems with using A2003 to modify an A2000 ADP
application..... it keeps corrupting it on me :(

Br@dley


Make sure you're using the latest A2K3 service pack. It helps that
problem very noticeably.


I'm pretty sure I have the latest updates of everything....incl.
A2003sp1

Br@dley
Nov 13 '05 #9

P: n/a
Lauren Wilson wrote:
So, this STILL leaves me with another question: If I leave our Access
2000 app in 2000 format, use Access 2003 to continue development and
upgrades but avoid incorporating any Access 2003 specific features,
will my users be able to continue using Access 2000 Runtime to run the
app?


If you normally distribute an MDE you will still need a copy of Access 2000 to
create that. Access 2003 can only create an MDE in the newer 2002/2003 format
which would not work for your users with the 2000 runtime.

--
I don't check the Email account attached
to this message. Send instead to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
Nov 13 '05 #10

P: n/a
On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 11:42:57 GMT, "Rick Brandt"
<ri*********@hotmail.com> wrote:
Lauren Wilson wrote:
So, this STILL leaves me with another question: If I leave our Access
2000 app in 2000 format, use Access 2003 to continue development and
upgrades but avoid incorporating any Access 2003 specific features,
will my users be able to continue using Access 2000 Runtime to run the
app?


If you normally distribute an MDE you will still need a copy of Access 2000 to
create that. Access 2003 can only create an MDE in the newer 2002/2003 format
which would not work for your users with the 2000 runtime.


This is straight from the Great Big Book of DAMN! What on earth is
Microsoft trying to do by placing a new obstacle to MDE distribution?

I think it's time to accelerate our plans to move this entire 5 year
old, 10,000 user base app to a non-Microsoft platform.
Nov 13 '05 #11

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.