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genealogy database

P: n/a
Are there any good primers or Access examples out there re. creating a
genealogy-type database?
Nov 13 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 23:45:46 -0800, "Mike Turco"
<mi*******@yahoo-no-spam-4-me.com> wrote:
Are there any good primers or Access examples out there re. creating a
genealogy-type database?


No good ones. Genealogy is hard to describe in plain language, let
alone a programming language. If it's not homework, consider buying
application softtware. I understand the Mormon Church has a good one.

--
Mike Sherrill
Information Management Systems
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
The Mormon Church has a FREE program to use, you can download it at:
http://www.familysearch.org/
On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 23:45:46 -0800, "Mike Turco"
<mi*******@yahoo-no-spam-4-me.com> wrote:
Are there any good primers or Access examples out there re. creating a
genealogy-type database?


Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a

"Davidml" <da*****@netwiz.net> wrote in message
news:pe********************************@4ax.com...
The Mormon Church has a FREE program to use, you can download it at:
http://www.familysearch.org/


I was checking that out. Mike Sherrill also pointed out their database. I've
been asked to look into this by a large organization. I guess that's
something for which the mornoms qualify!

There are elements to this kind of thing, I'm sure, that aren't readily
apparent when you run an existing program. I was hoping to get an idea of
how a G database is structured. For example, what is a common
table/relationship structure for documenting a large family tree? How does
that structure change when you're doing, say a hundred or a thouscand
families?

Mike
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
The link below I found has a tom of data models. If you want to do it
in MS Access, this should help. It also provides an email address for
help creating it.

http://www.databaseanswers.org/data_...logy/index.htm

Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 08:50:18 -0800, "Mike Turco"
<mi*******@yahoo-no-spam-4-me.com> wrote:

"Davidml" <da*****@netwiz.net> wrote in message
news:pe********************************@4ax.com.. .
The Mormon Church has a FREE program to use, you can download it at:
http://www.familysearch.org/


I was checking that out. Mike Sherrill also pointed out their database. I've
been asked to look into this by a large organization. I guess that's
something for which the mornoms qualify!

There are elements to this kind of thing, I'm sure, that aren't readily
apparent when you run an existing program. I was hoping to get an idea of
how a G database is structured. For example, what is a common
table/relationship structure for documenting a large family tree?


Store persons separately from their interrelationships.

Don't be surprised by loops in the personal relationships, by adopted
children of unknown parentage, or by outright lies.

--
Mike Sherrill
Information Management Systems
Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
Mike Sherrill <MS*************@compuserve.com> wrote in
news:i3********************************@4ax.com:
Don't be surprised by loops in the personal relationships, by adopted
children of unknown parentage, or by outright lies.


Sometimes the lies or errors are in the written records, while family lore or
legends are correct. For years I have tried to reconcile a birth entry in a
parish registry with a lot of things that are generally accepted in two
families. There is no fit at all. After gathering a lot of evidence to
support the generally accepted stories, and considering my own recollections,
I have come to believe that the written record is wrong.

--
Lyle
--
Nov 13 '05 #7

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