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Production tracking database

P: n/a
KD
I am attempting to set up a data base that tracks daily production of
7 different machines. I need to track employes on machines, hours for
each machine,pieces made,setups and board feet.When I get this all
together I would like to generate reports that show totals for each
machine daily weekly and monthly for each shift
thanks for any advice
Nov 13 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
> (1) discussing that here, so that others can benefit (that's the way
newsgroups are supposed to work) or


I do understand the purpose of news groups but felt this was not of
general interest. He is tallking about a huge project to which I felt
I could lend my experience. No, I have no software to sell - I don't
own it. I just wanted to discuss it with the guy and help him out, if
possible. If he wants to write to me, it should be his call.
Thanks to all,
Hank Reed hankrunner on aol
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
"Hank Reed" wrote
I do understand the purpose of news
groups but felt this was not of general
interest.
This newsgroup is read by thousands, tens of thousands, perhaps hundreds of
thousands of people around the world. I suspect more than a handful would
have an interest in a production tracking database, even if there's not one
on their immediate agenda. That would be the case with me: interested, no
such project planned.
He is tallking about a huge project
to which I felt I could lend my experience.


Your Q&A on the subject would be of interest to me, and I am sure, to others
here, if you would not mind the discussion being public. And, if someone
later did initiate such a project, they could search the archives of the
newsgroup at http://groups.google.com and read your discussion.

If you feel a need to keep it private, we can understand and I wish you much
success with both your project and the original poster's project.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
Larry,
Thanks for your input. I have no need to keep it private but I
wrote it as an employee and therefore have no claim to the code so I
would only posts snippets if anything.
I thought I could be more help to the original poster to discuss
hoops we went through to get where we are. I enjoy this site and use it
on nearly a daily basis.
A project such as his can get big in a hurry depending on the amount
of control and reports he needs. He hasn't written to me anyway so
perhaps we can stop worrying about the whole thing.
Thanks,
Hank Reed

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Don't just participate in USENET...get rewarded for it!
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
We are a job shop, (i.e. all small quantities, hundreds of different
parts) As a general outline, this is how we track production.
1. Every job is estimated by engineering for material and labor
required.
2. When an order is placed, it is linked to the estimate.
3. A job ticket is created, linked to the order, and released to the
floor
4. Each employee punches on the time clock in the specified sequence
of work
A. Their badge number
B. The job ticket number
C. The Workstation
5. When they clock off, they enter the number of pieces completed
6. When a customer calls, anyone can view the current progress of the
part.
7. When the job ships, the material on the estimate is consumed from
inventory.

Besides being able to track a part through the factory, we also
accumulate a lot of historical data relative to how long it takes to
cut a pipe, bend a pipe, or braze a fitting. This is useful when
making new estimates. We also can determine the productivity of
employees by comparing the number of bends or braze joints in a
selected time frame.

I hope this is useful.
Hank Reed
Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
Thanks, Hank. It is interesting.

I was on a short contract to design what they called a "workflow"
application, somewhat similar, for a custom novelty printing company some
years back. I don't know when/if they implemented the design -- the employee
who was pushing for it was leaving the company and wanted to encapsulate his
experience/knowledge in the application. But, without him to "champion" it,
I don't know if it went anywhere.

It differed in that there were large, sometime very large, numbers of pages
at each workstation, and (what seemed to me from long-past manufacturing
engineering experience) very high spoilage/defect rates at each operation.

Larry Linson
"Hank Reed" <ha********@aol.com> wrote in message
news:f4**************************@posting.google.c om...
We are a job shop, (i.e. all small quantities, hundreds of different
parts) As a general outline, this is how we track production.
1. Every job is estimated by engineering for material and labor
required.
2. When an order is placed, it is linked to the estimate.
3. A job ticket is created, linked to the order, and released to the
floor
4. Each employee punches on the time clock in the specified sequence
of work
A. Their badge number
B. The job ticket number
C. The Workstation
5. When they clock off, they enter the number of pieces completed
6. When a customer calls, anyone can view the current progress of the
part.
7. When the job ships, the material on the estimate is consumed from
inventory.

Besides being able to track a part through the factory, we also
accumulate a lot of historical data relative to how long it takes to
cut a pipe, bend a pipe, or braze a fitting. This is useful when
making new estimates. We also can determine the productivity of
employees by comparing the number of bends or braze joints in a
selected time frame.

I hope this is useful.
Hank Reed

Nov 13 '05 #6

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