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years,months,days

P: n/a
Exists a function that determined between two dates the years,months and
days?

Thanks a lot.
Jun 3 '06 #1
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P: n/a
dim x as date = someDate.subtract(someOtherDate)

Then format x as desired.

"Jose" <jo********@unica.com> wrote in message
news:ui**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
Exists a function that determined between two dates the years,months and
days?

Thanks a lot.

Jun 3 '06 #2

P: n/a
Scott M. wrote:
dim x as date = someDate.subtract(someOtherDate)


The Subtract method on the DateTime structure, when passed another
DateTime, returns a Timespan object and not a DateTime object.

Dim ts As TimeSpan = someDate.Subtract(someOtherDate)

Then you can get the years, months, and days properties from the
TimeSpan.

Jun 5 '06 #3

P: n/a
Chris Dunaway wrote:
Scott M. wrote:
dim x as date = someDate.subtract(someOtherDate)


The Subtract method on the DateTime structure, when passed another
DateTime, returns a Timespan object and not a DateTime object.

Dim ts As TimeSpan = someDate.Subtract(someOtherDate)

Then you can get the years, months, and days properties from the
TimeSpan.


Actually, you can only get the value as days.

As the timespan doesn't contain a starting and ending time, there is no
way to determine the exact length in months and years.
Jun 5 '06 #4

P: n/a
or you could use a real function like DateDiff right?

who the hell changes a function like DateDiff??

-Aaron
Göran Andersson wrote:
Chris Dunaway wrote:
Scott M. wrote:
dim x as date = someDate.subtract(someOtherDate)


The Subtract method on the DateTime structure, when passed another
DateTime, returns a Timespan object and not a DateTime object.

Dim ts As TimeSpan = someDate.Subtract(someOtherDate)

Then you can get the years, months, and days properties from the
TimeSpan.


Actually, you can only get the value as days.

As the timespan doesn't contain a starting and ending time, there is no
way to determine the exact length in months and years.


Jun 5 '06 #5

P: n/a
Göran Andersson wrote:

Actually, you can only get the value as days.


I stand corrected. But when you subtract a date from another date, it
returns a Timespan and not a date.

Jun 6 '06 #6

P: n/a
Jose,

In my idea does this never work as measuring system. Somehow I thought it is
not possible with the Gregorian Calender, every month can have a different
length you know, not to talk about leap years. Therefore it is not such a
good measuring system.

Therefore
Date - Date represented as year, months, will will give a total other
result in by instance days as you use another startdate and add your
measured result.

(Years, weeks, days) or (years, days) will do a better job.
Although the leap year problem sustains..

That is the reason that some people want to use this kind of calendars.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positivist_Calendar

But just my thought.

Cor
Jun 6 '06 #7

P: n/a
Chris Dunaway wrote:
Göran Andersson wrote:
Actually, you can only get the value as days.


I stand corrected. But when you subtract a date from another date, it
returns a Timespan and not a date.


Yes. If you read my next sentence you see that I am referring to the
TimeSpan structure. That implies that I concur with your observation. :)
Jun 6 '06 #8

P: n/a
Göran Andersson wrote:
Yes. If you read my next sentence you see that I am referring to the
TimeSpan structure. That implies that I concur with your observation. :)


My mistake, I was actually replying to Scott M.'s message.

Jun 7 '06 #9

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