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How to set-up sql server 2000 in win2k3 Server to store big-5 Chinese data

P: n/a
I am using Windows 2003 Server English Version. I wanna store the big-5
data so I install the sql server 2000 as if i install it in the Windows
2000 with Server Collation of the Chinese_Taiwan_Stroke_CL_AS.
However, the data are stored into the database server in unicode
instead of big-5 in that of windows 2000 OS.

I would like to ask how i can set so that the Sql Server 2000 can store
the big-5 data

Jul 23 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
(mi**********@gmail.com) writes:
I am using Windows 2003 Server English Version. I wanna store the big-5
data so I install the sql server 2000 as if i install it in the Windows
2000 with Server Collation of the Chinese_Taiwan_Stroke_CL_AS.
However, the data are stored into the database server in unicode
instead of big-5 in that of windows 2000 OS.

I would like to ask how i can set so that the Sql Server 2000 can store
the big-5 data


First of all, my knowledge and experience of Chinese and its character
sets is very limited, so bear with me.

I was under the impression that for non-Unicode characters sets, East
Asian languages are stored in varchar as double-byte character sets.
Unicode is stored in nvarchar. So you would probably use varchar for
your data. Could this be the answer?
--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server SP3 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinf...2000/books.asp
Jul 23 '05 #2

P: n/a
I am using the varchar for the fields of table which i wanna save big-5
data.
When i entered the chinese data, the data can be saved. But when i read
the data from the web boswer (ie. IE ), i need to change the encoding
from unicode instead of big-5 in order to viewing it
Is it due to the language of the OS (ie. WIndows 2003)?

Jul 23 '05 #3

P: n/a
(mi**********@gmail.com) writes:
I am using the varchar for the fields of table which i wanna save big-5
data.

When i entered the chinese data, the data can be saved. But when i read
the data from the web boswer (ie. IE ), i need to change the encoding
from unicode instead of big-5 in order to viewing it

Is it due to the language of the OS (ie. WIndows 2003)?


Hm, if the columns in the database are varchar, then you just cannot
get Unicode into them. So my guess is that you do have Big-5 in the
database, and then something happens on the way to the web browser.

You could verify this by looking in Qurey Analyzer and doing a
SELECT on the table. If it looks OK, then I would guess it is
Big-5. Do run it even further you could do:

select convert(varbinary, big5col)

and the see whether the codes are Big-5 or Unicode. (This presumes that
you actually knows the codes for some characters.)

If my theory is correct that the data in the database is Big5, then
we need to find out why you get Unicode in the browser. Unfortunately,
I know almost as little about web servers as I know Chinese.


--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server SP3 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinf...2000/books.asp
Jul 23 '05 #4

P: n/a
(mi**********@gmail.com) writes:
I am using the varchar for the fields of table which i wanna save big-5
data.

When i entered the chinese data, the data can be saved. But when i read
the data from the web boswer (ie. IE ), i need to change the encoding
from unicode instead of big-5 in order to viewing it

Is it due to the language of the OS (ie. WIndows 2003)?


Hm, if the columns in the database are varchar, then you just cannot
get Unicode into them. So my guess is that you do have Big-5 in the
database, and then something happens on the way to the web browser.

You could verify this by looking in Qurey Analyzer and doing a
SELECT on the table. If it looks OK, then I would guess it is
Big-5. Do run it even further you could do:

select convert(varbinary, big5col)

and the see whether the codes are Big-5 or Unicode. (This presumes that
you actually knows the codes for some characters.)

If my theory is correct that the data in the database is Big5, then
we need to find out why you get Unicode in the browser. Unfortunately,
I know almost as little about web servers as I know Chinese.


--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server SP3 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinf...2000/books.asp
Jul 23 '05 #5

P: n/a
I try the method you mentioned in both MS SQL Server in Windows 2000
server and Windows 2K3.

select convert(varbinary, big5col)

It is found that the binary is the same.

I have found out that if you add the following in the heading of the
page,
this page can show the big-5 character.

<%@ codepage=950 %>
As the string stored in database is in unicode format, if you set the
codepage as big-5 format, the data will be changed as big-5 and show in
the webpage.
Thank you for your great sugegstion

Ref: Chinese-simpified version:
http://www.evget.com/articles/evget_1092.html
Erland Sommarskog 寫道:
(mi**********@gmail.com) writes:
I am using the varchar for the fields of table which i wanna save big-5
data.

When i entered the chinese data, the data can be saved. But when i read
the data from the web boswer (ie. IE ), i need to change the encoding
from unicode instead of big-5 in order to viewing it

Is it due to the language of the OS (ie. WIndows 2003)?


Hm, if the columns in the database are varchar, then you just cannot
get Unicode into them. So my guess is that you do have Big-5 in the
database, and then something happens on the way to the web browser.

You could verify this by looking in Qurey Analyzer and doing a
SELECT on the table. If it looks OK, then I would guess it is
Big-5. Do run it even further you could do:

select convert(varbinary, big5col)

and the see whether the codes are Big-5 or Unicode. (This presumes that
you actually knows the codes for some characters.)

If my theory is correct that the data in the database is Big5, then
we need to find out why you get Unicode in the browser. Unfortunately,
I know almost as little about web servers as I know Chinese.


--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server SP3 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinf...2000/books.asp


Jul 23 '05 #6

P: n/a
(mi**********@gmail.com) writes:
I try the method you mentioned in both MS SQL Server in Windows 2000
server and Windows 2K3.

select convert(varbinary, big5col)

It is found that the binary is the same.

I have found out that if you add the following in the heading of the
page,
this page can show the big-5 character.

<%@ codepage=950 %>
As the string stored in database is in unicode format, if you set the
codepage as big-5 format, the data will be changed as big-5 and show in
the webpage.
Thank you for your great sugegstion


I'm glad to have been to help about something I hardly know at all!

--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server SP3 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinf...2000/books.asp
Jul 23 '05 #7

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