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Win32: Detecting when system is locked or sleeping

P: n/a
I have written an application which works perfectly when the machine is
operating under normal conditions, however when the screen becomes
locked it imediately starts to fill up several hundred MB's of memory.

Is there a way to detect when the system is locked?

Best,

rod

May 22 '06 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a

rod> I have written an application which works perfectly when the
rod> machine is operating under normal conditions, however when the
rod> screen becomes locked it imediately starts to fill up several
rod> hundred MB's of memory.

What do you mean by "locked"? Unresponsive to mouse or keyboard activity?
Blue screen? What is your application doing while it's filling up memory?
Which memory, disk or RAM?

rod> Is there a way to detect when the system is locked?

Perhaps Nagios can help: <http://www.nagios.org/>. In general, I don't
think a system can be relied upon to detect its own demise, as the recent
PC/Mac commercial about restarting illustrates:
<http://www.apple.com/getamac/ads/>.

Skip
May 22 '06 #2

P: n/a
sk**@pobox.com wrote:

rod> I have written an application which works perfectly when the
rod> machine is operating under normal conditions, however when the
rod> screen becomes locked it imediately starts to fill up several
rod> hundred MB's of memory.

What do you mean by "locked"? Unresponsive to mouse or keyboard activity?
Blue screen? What is your application doing while it's filling up memory?
Which memory, disk or RAM?


I think he means locked by the user for security.

Keyboard/mouse lock. As in ctrl-alt-del -> [Lock Computer]

Not the blue-screen, hung, rogered type of lock which is not voluntary and
rather more frequent.
--
Dale Strickland-Clark
Riverhall Systems www.riverhall.co.uk
We're recruiting. See the web site for details.

May 22 '06 #3

P: n/a
Yes, I mean just a good old fashioned screen lock (for security)
initiated by the user. 'Sadly' there has been nothing as exciting as a
blue-screen of death as yet, not even when the app swells to 400MB.

Best,

rod

May 22 '06 #4

P: n/a
Further to my last post, I will try some of the tips presented above.
Also the app writes to the screen display (or Active Desktop). As
someone suggested, that could be where the problem is.

Best.

rod

May 23 '06 #5

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