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Time zone and 24 hours time format

Hi,

What time zones tend to use 24 hours time format? Googling hasn't
been able to answer the question.

Thank you.

Oct 16 '07 #1
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23 Replies
On Tue, 16 Oct 2007 22:25:56 +0200, <ta********@gmail.comwrote:
What time zones tend to use 24 hours time format? Googling hasn't
been able to answer the question.
Outside the USA, almost everyone. Haven't got a full list though.
--
Rik Wasmus
Oct 16 '07 #2
ta********@gmail.com wrote:
Hi,

What time zones tend to use 24 hours time format? Googling hasn't
been able to answer the question.
Time format preferences, like date and currency format preferences, are
generally national in scope, so you'd have to inquire what *countries*
tend to use 24-hour format. There isn't any reason why the various
peoples who happen to live in one time zone would share a time format.
Oct 16 '07 #3
On Oct 16, 4:38 pm, Harlan Messinger
<hmessinger.removet...@comcast.netwrote:
tatata9...@gmail.com wrote:
Hi,
What time zones tend to use 24 hours time format? Googling hasn't
been able to answer the question.

Time format preferences, like date and currency format preferences, are
generally national in scope, so you'd have to inquire what *countries*
tend to use 24-hour format. There isn't any reason why the various
peoples who happen to live in one time zone would share a time format.
Thank you both. The initial idea was, if the answer is clear it could
eliminate a question for users (input), but I agree, why not give
users a choice (between 12 and 24)?

Great, much appreciated.

Oct 16 '07 #4
ta********@gmail.com schreef:
Hi,

What time zones tend to use 24 hours time format? Googling hasn't
been able to answer the question.

Thank you.
How about this one:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date_an...ion_by_country

--
Rob
Oct 16 '07 #5
On Oct 16, 6:44 pm, Rob Waaijenberg <robwaaijenb...@hotmail.com>
wrote:
tatata9...@gmail.com schreef:
Hi,
What time zones tend to use 24 hours time format? Googling hasn't
been able to answer the question.
Thank you.

How about this one:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date_an...ion_by_country

--
Rob
Thanks, Rob, but I still think giving a user a choice is more
flexible.

Oct 17 '07 #6
On Tue, 16 Oct 2007 16:38:19 -0400 in 5n************@mid.individual.net,
Harlan Messinger <hm*******************@comcast.netwrote:
ta********@gmail.com wrote:
>Hi,

What time zones tend to use 24 hours time format? Googling hasn't
been able to answer the question.

Time format preferences, like date and currency format preferences, are
generally national in scope, so you'd have to inquire what *countries*
tend to use 24-hour format. There isn't any reason why the various
peoples who happen to live in one time zone would share a time format.
Or even, people who live in the same country. Surely this is very much an
individual thing. I, for instance have 24hr clock set up on my PC / watch
etc, yet the radio broadcasts for instance a show billed as 11(am)-1(pm) -
very very rare (to the extent that I can't remember it) that it's billed
as 11-13. Or late evening news is almost always at 10, whereas listing
magazines or newspapers use 24hr format....

Stephan

--
Stephan Bird MChem(Hons) AMRSC
Currently in Caernarfon, Wales
Oct 17 '07 #7
On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 10:08:46 +0200, Stephan Bird
<st************@mad.scientist.comREMOVEwrote:
On Tue, 16 Oct 2007 16:38:19 -0400 in 5n************@mid.individual.net,
Harlan Messinger <hm*******************@comcast.netwrote:
>ta********@gmail.com wrote:
>>Hi,

What time zones tend to use 24 hours time format? Googling hasn't
been able to answer the question.

Time format preferences, like date and currency format preferences, are
generally national in scope, so you'd have to inquire what *countries*
tend to use 24-hour format. There isn't any reason why the various
peoples who happen to live in one time zone would share a time format.

Or even, people who live in the same country. Surely this is very much an
individual thing. I, for instance have 24hr clock set up on my PC / watch
etc, yet the radio broadcasts for instance a show billed as 11(am)-1(pm)
-
very very rare (to the extent that I can't remember it) that it's billed
as 11-13. Or late evening news is almost always at 10, whereas listing
magazines or newspapers use 24hr format....
Then again, weird difference between written & spoken language. A 24 hour
clock is pretty standard in print here, AM/PM is seldomly used, but
there's close to noone actually calling it 'fourteen' or 'twenty' o'clock,
that's still just 2 and 8.

--
Rik Wasmus
Oct 17 '07 #8
On 2007-10-17, Rik Wasmus <lu************@hotmail.comwrote:
[...]
Then again, weird difference between written & spoken language. A 24 hour
clock is pretty standard in print here, AM/PM is seldomly used, but
there's close to noone actually calling it 'fourteen' or 'twenty' o'clock,
that's still just 2 and 8.
In France they do actually say things like "dix-neuf heures" in ordinary
conversation. Perhaps it appeals to their sense of modernism.

In general, the 24 hour clock is useful for displaying time in different
time zones or for things like train times, when the context doesn't
indicate easily whether you mean am or pm.
Oct 17 '07 #9
I, for instance have 24hr clock set up on my PC / watch
etc, yet the radio broadcasts for instance a show billed as 11(am)-1(pm) -
very very rare (to the extent that I can't remember it) that it's billed
as 11-13.
TV Schedules always used to be printed in 24-hour format, but these days
are almost universally printed in 12-hour format with no indication of
am/pm.

Most annoyingly are the TV announcements that say "Coming up at 9
o'clock..." with no mention of whether it is am or pm!

--
Steve Swift
http://www.swiftys.org.uk/swifty.html
http://www.ringers.org.uk
Oct 17 '07 #10
In comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html message <1192572042.109978.243570
@q3g2000prf.googlegroups.com>, Tue, 16 Oct 2007 22:00:42,
ta********@gmail.com posted:
>
Thank you both. The initial idea was, if the answer is clear it could
eliminate a question for users (input), but I agree, why not give
users a choice (between 12 and 24)?
Because it would be pandering to obstinacy and a pointless waste of
resources - unless your site is specifically aimed at the mentally
inadequate. Everyone of even approximately normal intelligence can
understand 24-hour times.

--
(c) John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v6.05 IE 6.
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/- w. FAQish topics, links, acronyms
PAS EXE etc : <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/programs/- see 00index.htm
Dates - miscdate.htm moredate.htm js-dates.htm pas-time.htm critdate.htm etc.
Oct 17 '07 #11
Dr J R Stockton wrote:
In comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html message <1192572042.109978.243570
@q3g2000prf.googlegroups.com>, Tue, 16 Oct 2007 22:00:42,
ta********@gmail.com posted:
>>
Thank you both. The initial idea was, if the answer is clear it could
eliminate a question for users (input), but I agree, why not give
users a choice (between 12 and 24)?

Because it would be pandering to obstinacy and a pointless waste of
resources - unless your site is specifically aimed at the mentally
inadequate. Everyone of even approximately normal intelligence can
understand 24-hour times.
The site is centred around date & times.
It's a good idea to let the user choose the format he is most comfortable
with, as he will read thousands dates and times.

Similarly, in France, most clocks, have a button, or an option, to change
from the 24 hour to the 12 hour notation.

People have variable preferences around the world. There's nothing wrong
with giving preference choices.

--
If you've a question that doesn't belong to Usenet, contact me at
<ta*****************@yahoDELETETHATo.fr>
Oct 17 '07 #12
Dr J R Stockton wrote:
>
Everyone of even approximately normal intelligence can
understand 24-hour times.
Using 24-hour times in the U.S. is rare enough so the average person
probably won't know what it is.

--
Berg
Oct 17 '07 #13
Wed, 17 Oct 2007 11:32:52 +0100 from Steve Swift
<St***********@gmail.com>:
TV Schedules always used to be printed in 24-hour format,
"Always"? Surely not!

For instance, to the best of my recollection TV Guide never did.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
HTML 4.01 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/
validator: http://validator.w3.org/
CSS 2.1 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/
validator: http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
Why We Won't Help You:
http://diveintomark.org/archives/200..._wont_help_you
Oct 18 '07 #14
Gazing into my crystal ball I observed Stephan Bird
<st************@mad.scientist.comREMOVEwriting in
news:gL******************************@bt.com:
Or even, people who live in the same country. Surely this is very much an
individual thing. I, for instance have 24hr clock set up on my PC / watch
I had a microwave that had the option to use 24 hour, and that was what I
chose. A computer geek friend (more geeky than I am) came over, noticed
it, and promptly started to let me know there was something wrong with it,
and he was sure he could fix it -- until I told him I wanted it that way.

My father was in the army so I grew up hearing I had to be in school by oh
eight hundred hours, then I worked at a 24hour answering server, and then
as a wire operator at a stock brokerage. Therefore, it's very natural for
me to write 16:30, and a lot faster than 4:30pm.

--
Adrienne Boswell at Home
Arbpen Web Site Design Services
http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
Please respond to the group so others can share

Oct 18 '07 #15
Stan Brown wrote:
Wed, 17 Oct 2007 11:32:52 +0100 from Steve Swift
<St***********@gmail.com>:
>TV Schedules always used to be printed in 24-hour format,

"Always"? Surely not!

For instance, to the best of my recollection TV Guide never did.
Agreed, and I don't know about you, but I remember them going back to
the sixties, if not the late fifties.
--
Blinky RLU 297263
Killing all posts from Google Groups
The Usenet Improvement Project - http://improve-usenet.org
Oct 18 '07 #16
Scripsit ta********@gmail.com:
What time zones tend to use 24 hours time format?
That's not an HTML question; it's grossly off-topic. Besides, your premises
are wrong. Time formats and time zones are completely different issues
(orthogonal, as we say in pseudomathematical jargon).

Oh, and consider yourself plonked for continued disturbance: you are just
adding noise to the group.

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

Oct 18 '07 #17
In comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html message <5n************@mid.indiv
idual.net>, Wed, 17 Oct 2007 18:54:00, Bergamot <be******@visi.com>
posted:
>Dr J R Stockton wrote:
>>
Everyone of even approximately normal intelligence can
understand 24-hour times.

Using 24-hour times in the U.S. is rare enough so the average person
probably won't know what it is.
If I had meant "does understand" I would have written that. The
exercise will, or might, do them good.

But surely the vast majority have come across "Military Time" being used
in the movies or on TV?

--
(c) John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v6.05 IE 6.
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/- w. FAQish topics, links, acronyms
PAS EXE etc : <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/programs/- see 00index.htm
Dates - miscdate.htm moredate.htm js-dates.htm pas-time.htm critdate.htm etc.
Oct 18 '07 #18
"Always"? Surely not!

The term "Always used to" implies a continuous period of time in the
past. It certainly was continuous between about 1950 (when I was
watching "Andy Pandy" and "Muffin the Mule") and some indeterminate time
in the past, but which I'd estimate as 10 years ago. I suspect the
watershed was when TV schedules became available in more than just the
Radio and TV times. This is all UK-centric, of course.

--
Steve Swift
http://www.swiftys.org.uk/swifty.html
http://www.ringers.org.uk
Oct 19 '07 #19
My father was in the army so I grew up hearing I had to be in school by oh
eight hundred hours, then I worked at a 24hour answering server, and then
as a wire operator at a stock brokerage. Therefore, it's very natural for
me to write 16:30, and a lot faster than 4:30pm.
And then there was the old army colonel who, when surveyed, said that he
hadn't had sex since nineteen fifty-four. When the surveyor remarked
that was a long time ago, he replied "Nonsense! It's only twenty-one
hundred hours now!"

So there's scope for confusion even between times and dates.

--
Steve Swift
http://www.swiftys.org.uk/swifty.html
http://www.ringers.org.uk
Oct 19 '07 #20
Dr J R Stockton wrote:
In comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html message <5n************@mid.indiv
idual.net>, Wed, 17 Oct 2007 18:54:00, Bergamot <be******@visi.com>
posted:
>>Dr J R Stockton wrote:
>>>
Everyone of even approximately normal intelligence can
understand 24-hour times.

Using 24-hour times in the U.S. is rare enough so the average person
probably won't know what it is.

If I had meant "does understand" I would have written that.
Perhaps you should be less ambiguous. ;)
The exercise will, or might, do them good.
That's an optimistic view, I think.
But surely the vast majority have come across "Military Time" being used
in the movies or on TV?
Someone not used to 24-hour times may know that is what they're seeing,
but if the goal is to be useful to the visitor, as in appointment
setting, then knowing what time it really is is what matters. No?

--
Berg
Oct 19 '07 #21
On Fri, 19 Oct 2007, Bergamot wrote:
Someone not used to 24-hour times may know that is what they're seeing,
but if the goal is to be useful to the visitor, as in appointment
setting, then knowing what time it really is is what matters. No?
I think the relevant (for this discussion, albeit irrelevant for this
group) viewpoints have been put forth. In countries where a 24-hour clock
is used for exact times (as distinct from vague hour indications in a
colloquial setting where other time indications may be used), a 12-hour
clock is confusing -- and vice versa. So whoever writes software to be
used everywhere should allow all timezones and *independently* both time
notations.

BTW, there are more than two informal time notations. For instance, in
Swahili one would use "saa mbili" ("two hours") for eight o'clock in the
morning, counting from sunrise.

--
Helmut Richter
Oct 19 '07 #22
On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 11:32:52 +0100, Steve Swift wrote:
Most annoyingly are the TV announcements that say "Coming up at 9
o'clock..." with no mention of whether it is am or pm!
In the US, times are given as <time>, <time -1 hrCentral. For Pacific
time (California), they delay the programs and run them at <time>.

If you're in the Mountain Time zone, you just have to subtract two hours
from <timeto come up with when the show will be on.

--
George Sexton
MH Software, Inc. - Home of Connect Daily Web Calendar
http://www.mhsoftware.com/connectdaily.htm
Oct 23 '07 #23
On Tue, 16 Oct 2007 13:25:56 -0700, tatata9999 wrote:
What time zones tend to use 24 hours time format? Googling hasn't
been able to answer the question.
What you need to do is go to the unicode.org Common Locale Data
Repository. It has the countries, and time format information you are
seeking.

Next, when a visitor comes to your site, you need to look at their
language preference string (Accept-Language header) and follow it.

For example, en_US is 12 hour, en_GB is 24 hour, while en_AU is 12 Hour.
Most other European countries are 24 hour.

--
George Sexton
MH Software, Inc. - Home of Connect Daily Web Calendar
http://www.mhsoftware.com/connectdaily.htm
Oct 23 '07 #24

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