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HADR split brain question

P: n/a
If server 01 running HADR in the primary role crashes, and the DBA does a
HADR takeover by force on the 02 server to switch roles, then the 02 server
is now the primary.

What happens when the Server 01 is brought back up? It still thinks it is
the primary because that was its role when it crashed and it does not know
about the takeover by force command that was issued. Does the 01 server
check the 02 server to see what role they are in before allowing any
connections?

Jan 23 '06 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
I have tried exactly that. It will keep its role as primary and will
also serve the clients by default, unless you do NOTHING but the
following:

db2 "start hadr on database <original_primary_database> as STANDBY"

This will change the state of your original_primary_database from
PRIMARY to STANDBY and will also initiate the log replay from current
primary server.

If by accident you type db2 stop hadr, then your HADR configuration is
toast, and your only option is to re-initialize your HADR setup (backup
followed by restore).

regards,
dotyet

Jan 23 '06 #2

P: n/a
"dotyet" <do****@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@g14g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
I have tried exactly that. It will keep its role as primary and will
also serve the clients by default, unless you do NOTHING but the
following:

db2 "start hadr on database <original_primary_database> as STANDBY"

This will change the state of your original_primary_database from
PRIMARY to STANDBY and will also initiate the log replay from current
primary server.

If by accident you type db2 stop hadr, then your HADR configuration is
toast, and your only option is to re-initialize your HADR setup (backup
followed by restore).

regards,
dotyet


When the old primary server comes back up, are you saying that it is
immediately accessible by applications even though the other server is now
primary also?

Is there some command that must issued (such as activate database) that
prevents it from being accessible by applications before you can issue:
db2 "start hadr on database <original_primary_database> as STANDBY"

If not, then how do you prevent the split brain problem?
Jan 24 '06 #3

P: n/a
The failed primary will retain the role of primary if it is simply
restarted (i.e., via application connection *attempt*, activate db, or
restart db command).

However, importantly, it should *not* allow an application connection
to succeed unless the standby is there and successfully re-pairs with
it. Rather, since the original standby took over and is no longer a
standby, the activation or connection to the original primary database
should be delayed for HADR_TIMEOUT (or 30 seconds of that's longer),
then fail with error SQL1768N reason 7 ("The primary database failed to
establish a connection to its standby database within the HADR timeout
interval").

If you observe otherwise, please report it to IBM as a defect.

Now, if you *force* the restarting original primary to start in primary
role (it should require the START HADR .. AS STANDBY BY FORCE command
to do so), then it will oblige. Starting "by force" tells HADR you
want to forget about the requirement for the standby to be there, since
you know there's good reason for it to be gone (maybe both primary and
standby failed concurrently, and the original primary is the first to
be restarted). If you happen to do this while the original standby has
meanwhile taken over as primary, guess what...self inflicted split
brain results.

Regarding "STOP HADR", yes, that command will make HADR go away.
Whether or not you can follow it by a successful attempt to restart
HADR it depends on whether the database is in a valid initialization
state (because HADR would be starting over from scratch). For example,
the standby should be in rollforward mode and with a database and log
stream that matches well with that of the primary. It is possible that
if you do nothing but stop hadr followed by start hadr, it might just
work. However, issuing stop hadr is not advisable if you really wanted
the current instantiation of the db to play HADR again later w/o
starting over from scratch. If you want to temporarily stop log
shipping, a better approach is to issue the "deactivate db" command at
the standby.

Regards,
- Steve P.
------------------------------------
Steve Pearson
IBM DB2 UDB for LUW Development
Portland, OR, USA

Jan 24 '06 #4

P: n/a
"Steve Pearson (news only)" <st*******@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@g44g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
The failed primary will retain the role of primary if it is simply
restarted (i.e., via application connection *attempt*, activate db, or
restart db command).

However, importantly, it should *not* allow an application connection
to succeed unless the standby is there and successfully re-pairs with
it. Rather, since the original standby took over and is no longer a
standby, the activation or connection to the original primary database
should be delayed for HADR_TIMEOUT (or 30 seconds of that's longer),
then fail with error SQL1768N reason 7 ("The primary database failed to
establish a connection to its standby database within the HADR timeout
interval").

If you observe otherwise, please report it to IBM as a defect.

Now, if you *force* the restarting original primary to start in primary
role (it should require the START HADR .. AS STANDBY BY FORCE command
to do so), then it will oblige. Starting "by force" tells HADR you
want to forget about the requirement for the standby to be there, since
you know there's good reason for it to be gone (maybe both primary and
standby failed concurrently, and the original primary is the first to
be restarted). If you happen to do this while the original standby has
meanwhile taken over as primary, guess what...self inflicted split
brain results.

Regarding "STOP HADR", yes, that command will make HADR go away.
Whether or not you can follow it by a successful attempt to restart
HADR it depends on whether the database is in a valid initialization
state (because HADR would be starting over from scratch). For example,
the standby should be in rollforward mode and with a database and log
stream that matches well with that of the primary. It is possible that
if you do nothing but stop hadr followed by start hadr, it might just
work. However, issuing stop hadr is not advisable if you really wanted
the current instantiation of the db to play HADR again later w/o
starting over from scratch. If you want to temporarily stop log
shipping, a better approach is to issue the "deactivate db" command at
the standby.

Regards,
- Steve P.
------------------------------------
Steve Pearson
IBM DB2 UDB for LUW Development
Portland, OR, USA


Steve, I appreciate your comments, but lets get back to the question I
raised. For the purposes of this discussion, please assume that I am fairly
knowledgeable about HADR, having worked with it for several months now, so
lets dispense the fundamentals.

If the original primary server crashes (assume a hardware failure of some
kind), we will do an HADR takeover by force (force is necessary because the
original primary is unreachable) and original standby is now the primary.
Obviously databases are no longer in peer state if the original primary
server crashes because of hardware failure. Once the takeover has occurred,
DB2 automatic client reroute (or whatever mechanism one chooses) will point
the applications to the new primary server (which was previously the standby
database). Processing of the application continues normally.

Now, at some subsequent point, we will fix the hardware problem with the
original primary and attempt to bring it online as the standby. After it is
brought online as the standby, it will catch up with the logs, and only then
we can do a HADR takeover (without force) to make it the primary again. I
don't think the timeout is relevant since I am assuming that original
primary will be down for several hours before it can be repaired.

However, the problem is how do I bring the original primary server back up
after hardware repair as the standby. In its last state before the server
crashed, it thought it was the primary, and since a HADR takeover has now
occurred and the original standby is now the primary, then I will have 2
primary databases (split brain) when the original standby is repaired and
brought back up. Any new connections might go to the original primary before
I have a chance to make it the standby by issuing the command:
db2 "start hadr on database <original_primary_database> as STANDBY"

So how do I prevent a split brain (even for a short period) when my primary
server crashes and I bring it back online, and before I can designate it as
the standby (I already have a primary running). This seems like a
fundamental issue that must be solved for HADR to provide a continuous
availability solution.

One of the things that I think DB2 should do, is that any database where
HADR is configured should attempt establish peer state before any
connections are allowed, and if the other database is already in primary
role, and it was activated first, the last database to be activated should
either automatically start as standby, or should not allow connections until
some affirmative action is taken by the DBA (allowing the DBA to designate
it as standby before any connections are allowed).

In the absence of DB2 providing the above capability, perhaps there are some
procedural things that can be done to not allow connections when the server
is brought back up, allowing the DBA to make it standby. But I don't see how
this can be done via SQL statements (such as revoke connection authority)
since the revoke can only be issued on a database that is primary and
available for new connections.
Jan 24 '06 #5

P: n/a

Mark A wrote:
"Steve Pearson (news only)" <st*******@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@g44g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
The failed primary will retain the role of primary if it is simply
restarted (i.e., via application connection *attempt*, activate db, or
restart db command).

However, importantly, it should *not* allow an application connection
to succeed unless the standby is there and successfully re-pairs with
it. Rather, since the original standby took over and is no longer a
standby, the activation or connection to the original primary database
should be delayed for HADR_TIMEOUT (or 30 seconds of that's longer),
then fail with error SQL1768N reason 7 ("The primary database failed to
establish a connection to its standby database within the HADR timeout
interval").

If you observe otherwise, please report it to IBM as a defect.

Now, if you *force* the restarting original primary to start in primary
role (it should require the START HADR .. AS STANDBY BY FORCE command
to do so), then it will oblige. Starting "by force" tells HADR you
want to forget about the requirement for the standby to be there, since
you know there's good reason for it to be gone (maybe both primary and
standby failed concurrently, and the original primary is the first to
be restarted). If you happen to do this while the original standby has
meanwhile taken over as primary, guess what...self inflicted split
brain results.

Regarding "STOP HADR", yes, that command will make HADR go away.
Whether or not you can follow it by a successful attempt to restart
HADR it depends on whether the database is in a valid initialization
state (because HADR would be starting over from scratch). For example,
the standby should be in rollforward mode and with a database and log
stream that matches well with that of the primary. It is possible that
if you do nothing but stop hadr followed by start hadr, it might just
work. However, issuing stop hadr is not advisable if you really wanted
the current instantiation of the db to play HADR again later w/o
starting over from scratch. If you want to temporarily stop log
shipping, a better approach is to issue the "deactivate db" command at
the standby.

Regards,
- Steve P.
------------------------------------
Steve Pearson
IBM DB2 UDB for LUW Development
Portland, OR, USA


Steve, I appreciate your comments, but lets get back to the question I
raised. For the purposes of this discussion, please assume that I am fairly
knowledgeable about HADR, having worked with it for several months now, so
lets dispense the fundamentals.

If the original primary server crashes (assume a hardware failure of some
kind), we will do an HADR takeover by force (force is necessary because the
original primary is unreachable) and original standby is now the primary.
Obviously databases are no longer in peer state if the original primary
server crashes because of hardware failure. Once the takeover has occurred,
DB2 automatic client reroute (or whatever mechanism one chooses) will point
the applications to the new primary server (which was previously the standby
database). Processing of the application continues normally.

Now, at some subsequent point, we will fix the hardware problem with the
original primary and attempt to bring it online as the standby. After it is
brought online as the standby, it will catch up with the logs, and only then
we can do a HADR takeover (without force) to make it the primary again. I
don't think the timeout is relevant since I am assuming that original
primary will be down for several hours before it can be repaired.

However, the problem is how do I bring the original primary server back up
after hardware repair as the standby. In its last state before the server
crashed, it thought it was the primary, and since a HADR takeover has now
occurred and the original standby is now the primary, then I will have 2
primary databases (split brain) when the original standby is repaired and
brought back up. Any new connections might go to the original primary before
I have a chance to make it the standby by issuing the command:
db2 "start hadr on database <original_primary_database> as STANDBY"

So how do I prevent a split brain (even for a short period) when my primary
server crashes and I bring it back online, and before I can designate it as
the standby (I already have a primary running). This seems like a
fundamental issue that must be solved for HADR to provide a continuous
availability solution.

One of the things that I think DB2 should do, is that any database where
HADR is configured should attempt establish peer state before any
connections are allowed, and if the other database is already in primary
role, and it was activated first, the last database to be activated should
either automatically start as standby, or should not allow connections until
some affirmative action is taken by the DBA (allowing the DBA to designate
it as standby before any connections are allowed).

In the absence of DB2 providing the above capability, perhaps there are some
procedural things that can be done to not allow connections when the server
is brought back up, allowing the DBA to make it standby. But I don't see how
this can be done via SQL statements (such as revoke connection authority)
since the revoke can only be issued on a database that is primary and
available for new connections.

Oneway of doing it requires a start up script for db2. First we make
sure that DB2
can not auto start on any of the HADR server pairs. Then as part of
each start up
script both databases are place in a standby role... Then one of the
servers is
changed to be the primary. In a the case of a hardware crash, we don't
have to
worry about a slipt brain once the hardware problem is fix. However,
now a dba
must be involve on system reboot, which in some shops is on a schedule.
We are
still working a script to automatically start the databases in the
correct mode.
One thing way we are looking into is reading the db configuration files
from both
servers and then determining which database to start as the primary....

doug
www.db2helpdesk.com

Jan 24 '06 #6

P: n/a
> [...] I will have 2
primary databases (split brain) when the original standby is repaired and
brought back up. Any new connections might go to the original primary before
I have a chance to make it the standby by issuing the command:
db2 "start hadr on database <original_primary_database> as STANDBY"


That is not entirely correct. Yes, there will be two copies of the
database and both will report the current role as PRIMARY. However,
only the new primary will be able to do work. There is no window of
vulerability in the described scenario.

As I said above (and yes it is very fundamental to HADR), the
previously failed primary will ** NOT ** allow in new connections until
it establishes a connection with a standby. (With the mentioned
exception that if you force it to start, overriding this
usually-desired behavior by issuing "START HADR .. AS PRIMARY BY
FORCE", then it will start on its own, and in the case where the
original standby already took over as new primary, you'll have split
brain.)

All the means to normally restart the previously failed primary (such
as app connection, restart db command, activate db command, or START
HADR .. AS PRIMARY w/o the "by force" option) will be delayed, and
given there is no standby, will eventually fail with SQL1768N rc 7.
This is expressly designed to prevent just exactly this split brain
problem.

The only exception to this behavior of non-forced START HADR .. AS
PRIMARY is when HADR is started for the very first time. (That is,
when the HADR db role is changed from STANDARD to PRIMARY by the START
HADR command.) In this scenario, the primary may aleady be active and
connected by applications. We do not force them off (though the start
hadr command will still time out and fail if the standby is not
present). There cannot be a split brain in this scenario because only
the intended primary is present.

Regards,
- Steve P.
------------------------------------
Steve Pearson
IBM DB2 UDB for LUW Development
Portland, OR, USA

Jan 24 '06 #7

P: n/a
"Steve Pearson (news only)" <st*******@my-deja.com> wrote in message
That is not entirely correct. Yes, there will be two copies of the
database and both will report the current role as PRIMARY. However,
only the new primary will be able to do work. There is no window of
vulerability in the described scenario.

As I said above (and yes it is very fundamental to HADR), the
previously failed primary will ** NOT ** allow in new connections until
it establishes a connection with a standby. (With the mentioned
exception that if you force it to start, overriding this
usually-desired behavior by issuing "START HADR .. AS PRIMARY BY
FORCE", then it will start on its own, and in the case where the
original standby already took over as new primary, you'll have split
brain.)

All the means to normally restart the previously failed primary (such
as app connection, restart db command, activate db command, or START
HADR .. AS PRIMARY w/o the "by force" option) will be delayed, and
given there is no standby, will eventually fail with SQL1768N rc 7.
This is expressly designed to prevent just exactly this split brain
problem.

The only exception to this behavior of non-forced START HADR .. AS
PRIMARY is when HADR is started for the very first time. (That is,
when the HADR db role is changed from STANDARD to PRIMARY by the START
HADR command.) In this scenario, the primary may aleady be active and
connected by applications. We do not force them off (though the start
hadr command will still time out and fail if the standby is not
present). There cannot be a split brain in this scenario because only
the intended primary is present.

Regards,
- Steve P.
------------------------------------
Steve Pearson
IBM DB2 UDB for LUW Development
Portland, OR, USA


Thanks Steve. I do feel better about this now and will try it when I get a
chance.
Jan 24 '06 #8

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