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Re: (part 15) Han from China answers your C questions

P: n/a
Joachim Schmitz wrote:
What else would be expected out of China than to not honor intellectual
property?
I think that remark is an ill-considered and unhelpful generalisation.

--
"We dance, and the worlds melt away." - Curved Air, /Metamorphosis/

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Nov 13 '08 #1
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P: n/a
Chris Dollin wrote:
Joachim Schmitz wrote:
>What else would be expected out of China than to not honor
intellectual property?

I think that remark is an ill-considered and unhelpful generalisation.
I don't think so, I believe it's a general chinese mentality thing.

See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intellectual_property_in_the_People's_Republic_of_ China:
Difficulties
The enforcement of protection of intellectual property rights is
particularly difficult in the PRC. Without adequate education with regard to
IPRs, there is little awareness that infringement is a crime. For example,
though the first intellectual property law was drafted in 1982, the first
IPR training centre wasn't established until 1996.
Sometimes local protectionism may dilute the strength of central legislation
or the power of law enforcement. For example, local governments might not
want to genuinely support the work of anti-piracy supervisors. It may create
obstacles during IPRs investigation and assist local counterfeiters by
letting them hide their production lines in safer places. When
counterfeiters have good connections with local governmental or law
enforcement officials, they may find an umbrella for their counterfeiting
activity.

and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelle...blic_of_China:

In 2007, the Office of the United States Trade Representative placed China
on its "priority watch list" for intellectual property rights violations,
along with eleven other nations


Nov 13 '08 #2

P: n/a
In article <gf**********@online.de>,
Joachim Schmitz <jo**@schmitz-digital.dequoted himself and other people thusly:
>Chris Dollin wrote:
>Joachim Schmitz wrote:
>>What else would be expected out of China than to not honor
intellectual property?

I think that remark is an ill-considered and unhelpful generalisation.
The point is that, on Usenet, if you ever make anything that could, by
any stretch, be taken as racist (or any sort of "*-ist"), it is just a
matter of time (generally measured in minutes and hours) until someone,
somewhere, will post a "You're a racist!" (or a "*-ist") post in reply.

That's why (*) you have to be really careful about anything you post.

(*) Unless, of course, you like this sort of thing.

Nov 13 '08 #3

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