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typesafe bitwise operations based on enums

Hi,
I just wanted to share another library for doing type-safe bitwise
operations in C++:
http://bitwise-enum.googlecode.com

I found it useful, so hopefully it'll be for somebody else as well.

BRgds,
Daniel.
Jan 10 '08 #1
8 8422
On Jan 10, 2:06 pm, Daniel Gutson <danielgut...@gmail.comwrote:
I just wanted to share another library for doing type-safe bitwise
operations in C++:
http://bitwise-enum.googlecode.com
Well, it has a number of problems. The most basic one is, of
course, that the results of or'ing or and'ing an enum aren't the
expected type. And of course, it fails for some enums.

What's wrong with just:

#define defineEnumOps( Enum, Underlying ) \
inline \
Enum operator|( Enum lhs, Enum rhs ) \
{ \
return static_cast< Enum >( \
static_cast< Underlying >( lhs ) \
| static_cast< Underlying >( rhs ) ) ; \
} \
inline \
Enum& operator|=( Enum& lhs, Enum rhs ) \
{ \
lhs = lsh | rhs ; \
return lsh ; \
} \
// and so on...

I've got code which actually parses the source file and
generates the operators directly, rather than using a #define.
But that's only because it was easy to add this to my code which
generated the enum<->string mappings---once you have the parser
and all of the information, generating the above is trivial, but
it's not worth writing all that for just the operators.

The real difficult is, of course, the underlying type. You're
probably safe using "unsigned long" in all cases, unless the
compiler also supports long long. I've found it acceptable to
require the user to provide it (defaulting to unsigned int in
the case of the code generator).

--
James Kanze (GABI Software) email:ja*********@gmail.com
Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
Jan 10 '08 #2
James Kanze wrote:
On Jan 10, 2:06 pm, Daniel Gutson <danielgut...@gmail.comwrote:
> I just wanted to share another library for doing type-safe bitwise
operations in C++:
http://bitwise-enum.googlecode.com

Well, it has a number of problems. The most basic one is, of
course, that the results of or'ing or and'ing an enum aren't the
expected type. And of course, it fails for some enums.

What's wrong with just:

#define defineEnumOps( Enum, Underlying ) \
inline \
Enum operator|( Enum lhs, Enum rhs ) \
{ \
return static_cast< Enum >( \
static_cast< Underlying >( lhs ) \
| static_cast< Underlying >( rhs ) ) ; \
} \
inline \
Enum& operator|=( Enum& lhs, Enum rhs ) \
{ \
lhs = lsh | rhs ; \
return lsh ; \
} \
// and so on...
<snip>

I have not read the implementation, but from the example on the site seems
that the library is intended for a different purpose then what your code is
for. It's not suposed to be used when as the result of a bitwise operation
it results the same enum type (as you said that that does not make sense
all the time) it is only made so that you can "safely" declare a function
saying that this function should take an integral value that is the result
of bitwise operations of this enum. I supose the function knowing this can
assume various things on that integral and work with it in some specific
way.

Tho I am not even sure that the library does achieve that (or if it is
possible to achieve it).

--
Dizzy

Jan 10 '08 #3
On 2008-01-10 10:47:47 -0500, Daniel Gutson <da**********@gmail.comsaid:
- however, grouping related (and combinable) bitmasks is not
'typesafe': if a function receives a mask of LEDs bits, and another
receives a mask of FANs bits, no matter if you group the bits in
different enumerations, once you or them, you'll loose the type.
That doesn't happen if you overload the bitwise operators for your
enumerated type.
>
My library tries to solve this:
given the enums above, you can then:

typedef bitwise_enum<LED_BITSLeds_mask;
typedef bitwise_enum<FAN_BITSFans_mask;

void set_leds(Leds_mask mask);
void turn_fans(Fans_mask mask);

int main() {
set_leds(GREEN_LED | KITCHEN_FAN); // Compiler error
}

Moreover, you can now overload functions depending on the mask.

Hope it's clearer now! And thanks Dizzy for helping me to clarify.
It's clearer, but what's the advantage of this approach over defining
operator| and operator& for the enum type, and simply writing functions
that take that enum?

LED_BITS operator|(LED_BITS left, LED_BITS right)
{
return static_cast<LED_BITS>(left | right);
}

LED_BITS operator&(LED_BITS left, LED_BITS right)
{
return static_cast<LED_BITS>(left & right);
}

void set_leds(LED_BITS mask);
set_leds(GREEN_LED | KITCHEN_FAN); // compiler error

--
Pete
Roundhouse Consulting, Ltd. (www.versatilecoding.com) Author of "The
Standard C++ Library Extensions: a Tutorial and Reference
(www.petebecker.com/tr1book)

Jan 10 '08 #4
On Jan 10, 1:56*pm, Pete Becker <p...@versatilecoding.comwrote:
On 2008-01-10 10:47:47 -0500, Daniel Gutson <danielgut...@gmail.comsaid:
*- however, grouping related (and combinable) bitmasks is not
'typesafe': if a function receives a mask of LEDs bits, and another
receives a mask of FANs bits, no matter if you group the bits in
different enumerations, once you or them, you'll loose the type.

That doesn't happen if you overload the bitwise operators for your
enumerated type.


My library tries to solve this:
given the enums above, you can then:
typedef bitwise_enum<LED_BITSLeds_mask;
typedef bitwise_enum<FAN_BITSFans_mask;
void set_leds(Leds_mask mask);
void turn_fans(Fans_mask mask);
int main() {
* set_leds(GREEN_LED | KITCHEN_FAN); * // Compiler error
}
Moreover, you can now overload functions depending on the mask.
Hope it's clearer now! And thanks Dizzy for helping me to clarify.

It's clearer, but what's the advantage of this approach over defining
operator| and operator& for the enum type, and simply writing functions
that take that enum?

LED_BITS operator|(LED_BITS left, LED_BITS right)
{
return static_cast<LED_BITS>(left | right);

}

LED_BITS operator&(LED_BITS left, LED_BITS right)
{
return static_cast<LED_BITS>(left & right);

}

void set_leds(LED_BITS mask);
set_leds(GREEN_LED | KITCHEN_FAN); * * *// compiler error

--
* Pete
Roundhouse Consulting, Ltd. (www.versatilecoding.com) Author of "The
Standard C++ Library Extensions: a Tutorial and Reference
(www.petebecker.com/tr1book)- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Hi Pete.
I don't like having enum variables holding values that are not enums.
That's a hack. And I simply think that the right way to do that is a
class. Why not? It doesn't add any overhead, neither does any wrong.

Daniel.
Jan 10 '08 #5
On 2008-01-10 11:08:15 -0500, Daniel Gutson <da**********@gmail.comsaid:
I don't like having enum variables holding values that are not enums.
That's a hack.
It's an intended property of enum types. Each enum's underlying type is
required to be large enough to hold all the bits that make up every
value (that's not exactly the requirement, but you get the point),
precisely so that this kind of code will work.
And I simply think that the right way to do that is a
class. Why not? It doesn't add any overhead, neither does any wrong.
It adds mental overhead, having to remember that objects of type
LED_BITS combine to create objects of type bitwise_enum<LED_BITS>.

--
Pete
Roundhouse Consulting, Ltd. (www.versatilecoding.com) Author of "The
Standard C++ Library Extensions: a Tutorial and Reference
(www.petebecker.com/tr1book)

Jan 10 '08 #6
class. Why not? It doesn't add any overhead, neither does any wrong.
>
It adds mental overhead, having to remember that objects of type
LED_BITS combine to create objects of type bitwise_enum<LED_BITS>.
C'mon man!! Don't be that lazy! :D
Do a typedef and you're done!!

Daniel.
Jan 10 '08 #7
On 2008-01-10 12:20:49 -0500, Daniel Gutson <da**********@gmail.comsaid:
>>class. Why not? It doesn't add any overhead, neither does any wrong.

It adds mental overhead, having to remember that objects of type
LED_BITS combine to create objects of type bitwise_enum<LED_BITS>.

C'mon man!! Don't be that lazy! :D
Sigh.
Do a typedef and you're done!!
Whatever you call it, it's two different names, wiht different
properties, for what should be the same thing.

--
Pete
Roundhouse Consulting, Ltd. (www.versatilecoding.com) Author of "The
Standard C++ Library Extensions: a Tutorial and Reference
(www.petebecker.com/tr1book)

Jan 10 '08 #8
On Jan 10, 5:08 pm, Daniel Gutson <danielgut...@gmail.comwrote:
I don't like having enum variables holding values that are not
enums. That's a hack.
It's a design feature of C++ enums. A C++ enum is not (just) an
enumerated type. I agree that the language would be clearer if
it distinguished between enumerated types and bitmap types, but
it doesn't. The keyword enum is used for both.
And I simply think that the right way to do that is a class.
Why not? It doesn't add any overhead, neither does any wrong.
If you're going that route (and I can understand it), then
wouldn't the "correct" solution be something like:

class Leds
{
public:
static Leds const redLed ;
static Leds const greenLed ;
static Leds const blueLed ;

Leds() ; // all off.
Leds( Leds const& other ) ;
Leds& operator|=( Leds const& other ) ;
Leds& operator&=( Leds const& other ) ;
freind Leds operator~( Leds const& op ) ;

private:
unsigned int myValue ;
explicit Leds( unsigned int value ) ;
} ;

Leds operator|( Leds const& lhs, Leds const& rhs ) ;
Leds operator&( Leds const& lhs, Leds const& rhs ) ;

Internally, you use bits and a bit mask on myValue, but all the
user sees is some values which he can manipulate:

Leds l1 ;
l1 |= redLed ;
Leds l2( l1 | greenLed ) ;

It seems a bit heavy to me, but it's certainly the most
"correct" in the abstract sense. And if you need to do it a
lot... it would take about ten minutes to write an AWK script to
generate the class, given the class name and a list of its
(constant) values.

--
James Kanze (GABI Software) email:ja*********@gmail.com
Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
Jan 11 '08 #9

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