By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
424,967 Members | 1,690 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 424,967 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

external functionality with a functor object?

P: n/a
Hi everyone,

I'm trying to provide some external functionality to a class through a
functor object defined by the user. The concept is as follows:

template <class Functor>
class ClassA
{
...
double evaluate(){
Functor functor_;
return functor_();
}
...
};

// defined by the uesr
struct Functor
{
double operator() (){
return 2+2;
}
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
ClassA<Functora;
a.evaluate();
}

The problem that I have is that the functor needs to know what the
ClassA is to work. So I thought that maybe using a templatized functor
may work:
template <class T>
struct Functor
{
double operator() (T t_){
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};
This was a good idea except for the fact that now I have no idea of how
the user is going to delacre an object of classA =/
Any ideas????

Sep 22 '06 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
12 Replies


P: n/a
aaragon wrote:
I'm trying to provide some external functionality to a class through a
functor object defined by the user. The concept is as follows:

template <class Functor>
class ClassA
{
...
double evaluate(){
Functor functor_;
return functor_();
Or, in one line instead of two:

return Functor()();

:-)
}
...
};

// defined by the uesr
struct Functor
{
double operator() (){
return 2+2;
}
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
ClassA<Functora;
a.evaluate();
}

The problem that I have is that the functor needs to know what the
ClassA is to work. So I thought that maybe using a templatized
functor may work:
template <class T>
struct Functor
{
double operator() (T t_){
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
How about making your 'operator()' a template?

struct Functor
{
template<class Tdouble operator()(T t_) {
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};
};
This was a good idea except for the fact that now I have no idea of
how the user is going to delacre an object of classA =/
Any ideas????
See above.

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Sep 22 '06 #2

P: n/a

aaragon wrote:
Hi everyone,

I'm trying to provide some external functionality to a class through a
functor object defined by the user. The concept is as follows:

template <class Functor>
class ClassA
{
...
double evaluate(){
Functor functor_;
return functor_();
}
...
};

// defined by the uesr
struct Functor
{
double operator() (){
return 2+2;
}
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
ClassA<Functora;
a.evaluate();
}

The problem that I have is that the functor needs to know what the
ClassA is to work. So I thought that maybe using a templatized functor
may work:
template <class T>
struct Functor
{
double operator() (T t_){
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};
This was a good idea except for the fact that now I have no idea of how
the user is going to delacre an object of classA =/
Any ideas????
Not sure what you are trying to do by that Template Functor but this
should work.

struct eval
{
int x(){
return 1;
}
int y(){
return 2;
}

};

template <class Functor>
class ClassA
{
public:
eval tmp;
double evaluate(){
Functor functor_;
return functor_(tmp);
}
};
template <class T>
struct Functor
{
double operator() (T t_){
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}

};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

ClassA<Functor<eval a;
a.evaluate();
}

Sep 22 '06 #3

P: n/a

Victor Bazarov wrote:
aaragon wrote:
I'm trying to provide some external functionality to a class through a
functor object defined by the user. The concept is as follows:

template <class Functor>
class ClassA
{
...
double evaluate(){
Functor functor_;
return functor_();

Or, in one line instead of two:

return Functor()();

:-)
}
...
};

// defined by the uesr
struct Functor
{
double operator() (){
return 2+2;
}
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
ClassA<Functora;
a.evaluate();
}

The problem that I have is that the functor needs to know what the
ClassA is to work. So I thought that maybe using a templatized
functor may work:
template <class T>
struct Functor
{
double operator() (T t_){
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}

How about making your 'operator()' a template?

struct Functor
{
template<class Tdouble operator()(T t_) {
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};
Yes! This works fine! =)
};
This was a good idea except for the fact that now I have no idea of
how the user is going to delacre an object of classA =/
Any ideas????

See above.

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
However, I still have one problem. The user needs to implement the
entire functor and I don't think that is nice. Maybe if I write a
hidden implementation of the functor and the let the user only to
override the function ()(), perhaps???

Sep 22 '06 #4

P: n/a
aaragon wrote:
[..]
However, I still have one problem. The user needs to implement the
entire functor and I don't think that is nice. Maybe if I write a
hidden implementation of the functor and the let the user only to
override the function ()(), perhaps???
I don't understand the problem. Can you elaborate?

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Sep 22 '06 #5

P: n/a

Victor Bazarov wrote:
aaragon wrote:
[..]
However, I still have one problem. The user needs to implement the
entire functor and I don't think that is nice. Maybe if I write a
hidden implementation of the functor and the let the user only to
override the function ()(), perhaps???

I don't understand the problem. Can you elaborate?

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Sure. Well, the way you mentioned works just fine. But the idea is to
hide the implementation details for the user. Let's say, the user has
to write:

struct Functor
{
template<class T>
double operator()(T t_) {
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
ClassA<Functora;
a.evaluate();
....
}

and for someone who does not have idea about C++, the functor struct is
just hard! So, I was thinking that it may be a good idea to do
something easier, like overriding the function because the user does
not have to deal with implementation details. If the user does not put
template<class Tthe functor will not work. Any ideas to accomplish
this?

Sep 22 '06 #6

P: n/a
aaragon wrote:
I'm trying to provide some external functionality to a class through a
functor object defined by the user. The concept is as follows:

template <class Functor>
class ClassA
{
...
double evaluate(){
Functor functor_;
return functor_();
}
...
};

// defined by the uesr
struct Functor
{
double operator() (){
return 2+2;
}
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
ClassA<Functora;
a.evaluate();
}
Did you need all this templates? A simpler way can be:

class ClassA {
public:
// ...
virtual double operator () ()= 0;
//...
double evaluate ()
{
return operator () ();
}
};
class UserClassA : public ClassA {
double operator () ()
{
return 2 + 2;
}
};

int main ()
{
UserClassA a;
a.evaluate ();
}

--
Salu2
Sep 22 '06 #7

P: n/a
aaragon wrote:
Victor Bazarov wrote:
>aaragon wrote:
>>[..]
However, I still have one problem. The user needs to implement the
entire functor and I don't think that is nice. Maybe if I write a
hidden implementation of the functor and the let the user only to
override the function ()(), perhaps???

I don't understand the problem. Can you elaborate?

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask

Sure. Well, the way you mentioned works just fine. But the idea is
to hide the implementation details for the user. Let's say, the user
has to write:

struct Functor
{
template<class T>
double operator()(T t_) {
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
ClassA<Functora;
a.evaluate();
...
}

and for someone who does not have idea about C++, the functor struct
is just hard! So, I was thinking that it may be a good idea to do
something easier, like overriding the function because the user does
not have to deal with implementation details. If the user does not
put template<class Tthe functor will not work. Any ideas to
accomplish this?
So, what is the user supposed to write to accomplish what they need?
If the 'Functor' above is hard (and yes, member templates are not the
simplest thing to understand, I give you that), what would be "easy"
for somebody "who does not have idea about C++"? If they don't have
a clue, why would they be writing those functors?

Let's suppose you want to make their life easier. You write some kind
of base class

class BaseFunctor { /* not sure what goes here yet */ };

, right? OK, how the user will make use of it? They would have to
know to derive from it, correct? So

class UserFunctor : public Functor { /* something */ };

and then to achieve the goal they would need to know how to override
a virtual function and not to change the signature... It seems that
they still would need to know a lot.

Of course, another approach is to hide the scary template stuff into
a macro, like this:

#define FUNCTOR_METHOD(type, arg) \
template<class Tdouble operator()(T arg)

and then ask your user to do

struct Functor {
FUNCTOR_METHOD(double, t_) {
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};

Is that better?

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Sep 23 '06 #8

P: n/a

Victor Bazarov wrote:
aaragon wrote:
Victor Bazarov wrote:
aaragon wrote:
[..]
However, I still have one problem. The user needs to implement the
entire functor and I don't think that is nice. Maybe if I write a
hidden implementation of the functor and the let the user only to
override the function ()(), perhaps???

I don't understand the problem. Can you elaborate?

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Sure. Well, the way you mentioned works just fine. But the idea is
to hide the implementation details for the user. Let's say, the user
has to write:

struct Functor
{
template<class T>
double operator()(T t_) {
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
ClassA<Functora;
a.evaluate();
...
}

and for someone who does not have idea about C++, the functor struct
is just hard! So, I was thinking that it may be a good idea to do
something easier, like overriding the function because the user does
not have to deal with implementation details. If the user does not
put template<class Tthe functor will not work. Any ideas to
accomplish this?

So, what is the user supposed to write to accomplish what they need?
If the 'Functor' above is hard (and yes, member templates are not the
simplest thing to understand, I give you that), what would be "easy"
for somebody "who does not have idea about C++"? If they don't have
a clue, why would they be writing those functors?

Let's suppose you want to make their life easier. You write some kind
of base class

class BaseFunctor { /* not sure what goes here yet */ };

, right? OK, how the user will make use of it? They would have to
know to derive from it, correct? So

class UserFunctor : public Functor { /* something */ };

and then to achieve the goal they would need to know how to override
a virtual function and not to change the signature... It seems that
they still would need to know a lot.

Of course, another approach is to hide the scary template stuff into
a macro, like this:

#define FUNCTOR_METHOD(type, arg) \
template<class Tdouble operator()(T arg)

and then ask your user to do

struct Functor {
FUNCTOR_METHOD(double, t_) {
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};

Is that better?

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
=) That's a good idea! (altough I don't like to deal with macros for
some reason). Another would be to pass just a function instead of an
object, right? Maybe that's also an easy way to implement this. What
do you think?

Sep 23 '06 #9

P: n/a
aaragon wrote:
Victor Bazarov wrote:
>[..]
Of course, another approach is to hide the scary template stuff into
a macro, like this:

#define FUNCTOR_METHOD(type, arg) \
template<class Tdouble operator()(T arg)

and then ask your user to do

struct Functor {
FUNCTOR_METHOD(double, t_) {
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};

Is that better?

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask

=) That's a good idea! (altough I don't like to deal with macros for
some reason). Another would be to pass just a function instead of an
object, right? Maybe that's also an easy way to implement this. What
do you think?
Yes, functions are essentially functors (in C++ terms) since when named
by their name they can be called using the function call operator.

You still haven't explained how your users that aren't very sophisticated
(by your own opinion) will deal with those things. What do you expect
them to be able to do? What level do you think they need to be at to be
able to use your library? I am not saying you should require them to
implement type traits with a bunch of typedefs and static members to
successfully utilize your library, but FCOL, if they don't know C++ (or
most of it), maybe you should concentrate on Visual Basic mechanism for
them to use?

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Sep 24 '06 #10

P: n/a

Victor Bazarov wrote:
aaragon wrote:
Victor Bazarov wrote:
[..]
Of course, another approach is to hide the scary template stuff into
a macro, like this:

#define FUNCTOR_METHOD(type, arg) \
template<class Tdouble operator()(T arg)

and then ask your user to do

struct Functor {
FUNCTOR_METHOD(double, t_) {
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};

Is that better?

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
=) That's a good idea! (altough I don't like to deal with macros for
some reason). Another would be to pass just a function instead of an
object, right? Maybe that's also an easy way to implement this. What
do you think?

Yes, functions are essentially functors (in C++ terms) since when named
by their name they can be called using the function call operator.

You still haven't explained how your users that aren't very sophisticated
(by your own opinion) will deal with those things. What do you expect
them to be able to do? What level do you think they need to be at to be
able to use your library? I am not saying you should require them to
implement type traits with a bunch of typedefs and static members to
successfully utilize your library, but FCOL, if they don't know C++ (or
most of it), maybe you should concentrate on Visual Basic mechanism for
them to use?

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Well, I was expecting the users to write functions only so they don't
have to mess with writing a class or struct to provide the functor
object. I guess that the option of using the macro is the closest to
what I'm expecting. It shouldn't be encouraging to have a library that
is not user-friendly.

Sep 25 '06 #11

P: n/a
aaragon wrote:
[..]
Well, I was expecting the users to write functions only so they don't
have to mess with writing a class or struct to provide the functor
object.
Then you shouldn't ask them to use your class. You should ask them to
use a function (which would actually be a function template, in which
the type of the argument would be deduced from a call...)

You've given this example:

struct Functor
{
template<class T>
double operator()(T t_) {
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
ClassA<Functora;
a.evaluate();
...
}

My question would be, does 'a' get used after "a.evaluate()" in 'main'?
If yes, how? If not, why not? See, 'ClassA' is *your* class, but the
code is supposedly written by the user, correct? Perhaps you should
find a different way, like

double Function(ClassA const& a)
{
return a.x() + a.y();
}

int main()
{
ClassA a;
a.evaluate(Functor);
...
}

where 'evaluate' would be a template that applies its argument to
'this' object:

class ClassA {
...
template<class Fvoid evaluate(F f)
{
double d = f(*this);
}
};

.. In this case the user only has to write a function.
I guess that the option of using the macro is the closest to
what I'm expecting. It shouldn't be encouraging to have a library
that is not user-friendly.
<sigh I think nowadays some folks confuse "user-friendly" with
"moron-oriented".

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Sep 25 '06 #12

P: n/a

Victor Bazarov wrote:
aaragon wrote:
[..]
Well, I was expecting the users to write functions only so they don't
have to mess with writing a class or struct to provide the functor
object.

Then you shouldn't ask them to use your class. You should ask them to
use a function (which would actually be a function template, in which
the type of the argument would be deduced from a call...)

You've given this example:

struct Functor
{
template<class T>
double operator()(T t_) {
return t_.x() + t_.y();
}
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
ClassA<Functora;
a.evaluate();
...
}

My question would be, does 'a' get used after "a.evaluate()" in 'main'?
If yes, how? If not, why not? See, 'ClassA' is *your* class, but the
code is supposedly written by the user, correct? Perhaps you should
find a different way, like

double Function(ClassA const& a)
{
return a.x() + a.y();
}

int main()
{
ClassA a;
a.evaluate(Functor);
...
}

where 'evaluate' would be a template that applies its argument to
'this' object:

class ClassA {
...
template<class Fvoid evaluate(F f)
{
double d = f(*this);
}
};

. In this case the user only has to write a function.
I guess that the option of using the macro is the closest to
what I'm expecting. It shouldn't be encouraging to have a library
that is not user-friendly.

<sigh I think nowadays some folks confuse "user-friendly" with
"moron-oriented".

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Well, the idea behind the actual code is much more complicated than
what I wrote in these messages. I just put a simplified version of
what I want to do. The actual code consists in about 5 classes and
each one is within the next one. GA class, which has a population
class, wich has many individual classes which have a chromosome class.
So the idea is that each chromosome has to be evaluated with an
external function that is provided by the user and this evaluation is
passed to the GA class so that evolution can take place in the next
generation. So, the actual functor is not used again in the main.cpp
code but within the actual library.

I was able to solve the problem of evaluating chromosomes with by
passing the functor object when the chromosome template is
instantiated.

Regarding the "moron-oriented" statement. Well, I guess you're right
about that. It's just that the C++ knowledge of most people who use
libraries does not go beyond writing functions. I'll consider to see
if I can write the objective function as a function instead of as a
functor (even though I don't know yet how to do this, because this is
also new for me).



Sep 25 '06 #13

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.