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C++ array relative C question

P: n/a
I know that group is for C not for C++ but please try to help me ,
How can I declare size of an array as variable value came from screen?

#include "iostream.h"
#include "iomanip.h"
#include "conio.h"
float ArraySum(float Array[],int ArraySize);
int main()
{
clrscr();
int ArraySize=0;
// Read the array elements
cout << "Enter Array Size : " ;
cin >> ArraySize;
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
float Array[ArraySize];
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
cout <<endl<< "Enter Array Elements " ;
for (int i=0;i<=ArraySize;i++)
{
cout <<endl<< "Enter elements no " << i << " : ";
cin >> Array[i];
}
cout <<endl << "The sum of the elements values :" << setw(5) <<
ArraySum(Array,ArraySize);
return 0;
}

float ArraySum(float arr[],int n)
{
int total=0;
for (int i=0;i<=n;i++)
total+=arr[i];
return total;
}
Nov 14 '05 #1
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P: n/a
eh***********@yahoo.com (hp******@yahoo.com) wrote in
news:7e**************************@posting.google.c om:
I know that group is for C not for C++ but please try to help me ,
How can I declare size of an array as variable value came from screen?


You cannot. You must malloc() the memory and use a pointer instead of an
array. E.g.

float *pArray = malloc(ArraySize * sizeof *pArray);

--
- Mark ->
--
Nov 14 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hi there,

I know that group is for C not for C++ but please try to help me ,
The question is: What do you want to do?
Do you want to do it in C++, C89, C99?
We can help you only with the last two -- and, topically, only
with portable code.

How can I declare size of an array as variable value came from screen?
In all three languages: malloc() (and free())
C++: new (and delete)
C89: malloc() (and free())
C99: malloc() (and free()), variable length array

#include "iostream.h"
#include "iomanip.h"
#include "conio.h"
float ArraySum(float Array[],int ArraySize);
int main()
{
clrscr();
int ArraySize=0; note: use size_t for everything you want to use as array index // Read the array elements
cout << "Enter Array Size : " ;
cin >> ArraySize;
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
float Array[ArraySize];
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ in C99, this line is perfectly valid
C89:
float *Array;
at beginning of main() with the other declarations, and
Array = malloc(ArraySize * sizeof *Array);
if (Array == NULL) {
/* Handle error, usually exit(EXIT_FAILURE). */
}
and at the end -- or as soon as you no longer need the memory
Array is now pointing to --
free(Array); cout <<endl<< "Enter Array Elements " ;
for (int i=0;i<=ArraySize;i++)
{
cout <<endl<< "Enter elements no " << i << " : ";
cin >> Array[i];
}
cout <<endl << "The sum of the elements values :" << setw(5) <<
ArraySum(Array,ArraySize);
return 0;
}

float ArraySum(float arr[],int n)
{
int total=0;
for (int i=0;i<=n;i++)
total+=arr[i];
return total;
}


Note: For C99 VLAs, there are special options when passing them
as arguments.
If you can specify your needs somewhat clearer, we can help you
better.
It would also be better to give us C code instead of C++ code.
Cheers
Michael

Nov 14 '05 #3

P: n/a


hp******@yahoo.com wrote:
I know that group is for C not for C++ but please try to help me ,


Suppose you were in a Maths class, and the lecturer asked "Any
questions?" and someone piped up "I have this question about my Physics
homework."

It's not a case of whether or not the mathematicians present know
physics; in many cases they will, but they are there to discuss Maths,
not Physics, and the latter is a waste of everyone's time.

As is discussing C++ in comp.lang.c. Does your newsgroup software
somehow not have access to comp.lang.c++?

C and C++ are substantially different languages, even though they both
begin with the same letter (like C and Cobol, or PL/1 and PL/SQL), and
discussions about the details of one can develop into substantial
bandwidth hogs, even if this wasn't intended by the OP, so please
restrict your posting to On Topic items only.

Dave.
Nov 14 '05 #4

P: n/a
hp******@yahoo.com wrote:
I know that group is for C not for C++
So why not post to comp.lang.c++, where C++ is topical.
but please try to help me ,
How can I declare size of an array as variable value came from screen?
The OP's code is quoted at EOM. Here is a rewrite. Note that many
current implementations will not like it. Luckily, the comp.lang.c FAQ
and all texts for beginners give full explanations of the way to do this
that works for all C compilers.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

double ArraySum(double Array[], int ArraySize);

int main()
{
unsigned ArraySize = 0, i;
printf("Enter Array Size: ");
fflush(stdout);
scanf("%u", &ArraySize); /* see the FAQ for better ways to do
input safely */
double Array[ArraySize]; /* With many C compilers this will not
work. If using ISO C89, declare the
pointer-to-double Array at the top
of the block, malloc the space,
checking the return value. You may
find that preferable even if the
code given works. The FAQ gives good
coverage to the right way to do
that, as will any elementary text
for beginning programmers.

Notice that the broken "<=" in the
loop below and in ArraySum are
fixed. */
printf("Enter Array Elements ..\n");
for (i = 0; i < ArraySize; i++) {
printf(" Elements #%u: ", i);
scanf("%lg", &Array[i]); /* see the FAQ for better ways to
do input safely */
}
printf("The sum of the elements values : %g\n",
ArraySum(Array, ArraySize));
return 0;
}

double ArraySum(double arr[], int n)
{
int total = 0, i;
for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
total += arr[i];
return total;
}

#include "iostream.h"
#include "iomanip.h"
#include "conio.h"
float ArraySum(float Array[],int ArraySize);
int main()
{
clrscr();
int ArraySize=0;
// Read the array elements
cout << "Enter Array Size : " ;
cin >> ArraySize;
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
float Array[ArraySize];
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
cout <<endl<< "Enter Array Elements " ;
for (int i=0;i<=ArraySize;i++)
{
cout <<endl<< "Enter elements no " << i << " : ";
cin >> Array[i];
}
cout <<endl << "The sum of the elements values :" << setw(5) <<
ArraySum(Array,ArraySize);
return 0;
}

float ArraySum(float arr[],int n)
{
int total=0;
for (int i=0;i<=n;i++)
total+=arr[i];
return total;
}

Nov 14 '05 #5

P: n/a
hp******@yahoo.com wrote:
I know that group is for C not for C++ but please try to help me ,
How can I declare size of an array as variable value came from screen?
From your comments, it seems like you are writing C++ code.
Hence setting follow-up to c.l.c++ .

#include "iostream.h"
#include "iomanip.h"
They are deprecated headers as far as C++ is concerned.

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>


#include "conio.h"
This is non-standard header.
float ArraySum(float Array[],int ArraySize);
int main()
{
clrscr();
int ArraySize=0;
// Read the array elements
cout << "Enter Array Size : " ;
The compiler (C++ ) would have flagged an error here since
cout belongs to std namespace.

cin >> ArraySize;
Ditto for cin again.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
float Array[ArraySize];
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Nope. Use dynamic memory allocation.
cout <<endl<< "Enter Array Elements " ;
for (int i=0;i<=ArraySize;i++)
{
cout <<endl<< "Enter elements no " << i << " : ";
cin >> Array[i];
}
cout <<endl << "The sum of the elements values :" << setw(5) <<
ArraySum(Array,ArraySize);
return 0;
}

float ArraySum(float arr[],int n)
{
int total=0;
for (int i=0;i<=n;i++)
Please use size_t for array indices.
total+=arr[i];
return total;
}

--
Karthik.
http://akktech.blogspot.com .
Nov 14 '05 #6

P: n/a
hp******@yahoo.com wrote:
I know that group is for C not for C++ but please try to help me ,

Why? What is wrong with comp.lang.c++?


Brian Rodenborn
Nov 14 '05 #7

P: n/a
"Dave" <re*************@elcaro.moc> wrote in message
news:ii************@news.oracle.com...


hp******@yahoo.com wrote:
I know that group is for C not for C++ but please try to help me ,
Suppose you were in a Maths class, and the lecturer asked "Any
questions?" and someone piped up "I have this question about my

Physics homework."

It's not a case of whether or not the mathematicians present know
physics; in many cases they will, but they are there to discuss Maths,
not Physics, and the latter is a waste of everyone's time.

As is discussing C++ in comp.lang.c. Does your newsgroup software
somehow not have access to comp.lang.c++?

C and C++ are substantially different languages, even though they both
begin with the same letter (like C and Cobol, or PL/1 and PL/SQL), and
discussions about the details of one can develop into substantial
bandwidth hogs, even if this wasn't intended by the OP, so please
restrict your posting to On Topic items only.

Maths? There's more than one?
We just call it Math on this continent.

--
Mabden
Nov 14 '05 #8

P: n/a
"Default User" <fi********@boeing.com.invalid> wrote in message
news:I5********@news.boeing.com...
hp******@yahoo.com wrote:
I know that group is for C not for C++ but please try to help me ,

Why? What is wrong with comp.lang.c++?


Well, don't _even_ get me started about THOSE pricks!

;-)

--
Mabden
p.s. These are the jokes, folks...
p.p.s. I know you're there, I can hear you breathing.
Nov 14 '05 #9

P: n/a
Mabden wrote:
"Dave" <re*************@elcaro.moc> wrote
Suppose you were in a Maths class,
[snip]
Maths? There's more than one?
We just call it Math on this continent.


Look it up. It is called mathematics, short maths
(add scary capital letters when needed), as a subject as well as
a discipline. I find "math [Amer.] [ifml.]: maths" when looking
up "math"...

I do not know which continent you are from but I guess that
you did not pay attention in your *English* class.

--Michael

Nov 14 '05 #10

P: n/a
Michael Mair <ma********************@ians.uni-stuttgart.de> spoke thus:
Look it up. It is called mathematics, short maths
(add scary capital letters when needed), as a subject as well as
a discipline. I find "math [Amer.] [ifml.]: maths" when looking
up "math"...
I did (dictionary.com) and maths comes up as "chiefly British".
I do not know which continent you are from but I guess that
you did not pay attention in your *English* class.


Probably from the same one I'm from, where the subject is nearly
universally referred to as "math". While the Queen might disagree,
that's the way it is.

--
Christopher Benson-Manica | I *should* know what I'm talking about - if I
ataru(at)cyberspace.org | don't, I need to know. Flames welcome.
Nov 14 '05 #11

P: n/a
On Wed, 6 Oct 2004 12:54:27 +0000 (UTC), in comp.lang.c , Christopher
Benson-Manica <at***@nospam.cyberspace.org> wrote:
Probably from the same one I'm from, where the subject is nearly
universally referred to as "math". While the Queen might disagree,
that's the way it is.


While I'm sorry for you, the Rest of the World can't be held responsible
for the USA's inability to even write english, let alone speak it... :-)

(By the way, I have quite a problem understanding how you can truncate a
plural word to a singular one, without asking yourselves "which particular
bit of maths?". But then, the US was mostly colonised by ethnic cleansing
of one sort or another, so its unfair to also expect them to bother with
stuff like grammar and spelling.)
--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt>
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Nov 14 '05 #12

P: n/a
"Mark McIntyre" <ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:o7********************************@4ax.com...
On Wed, 6 Oct 2004 12:54:27 +0000 (UTC), in comp.lang.c , Christopher
Benson-Manica <at***@nospam.cyberspace.org> wrote:
Probably from the same one I'm from, where the subject is nearly
universally referred to as "math". While the Queen might disagree,
that's the way it is.
While I'm sorry for you, the Rest of the World can't be held

responsible for the USA's inability to even write english, let alone speak it... :-)
(By the way, I have quite a problem understanding how you can truncate a plural word to a singular one, without asking yourselves "which particular bit of maths?". But then, the US was mostly colonised by ethnic cleansing of one sort or another, so its unfair to also expect them to bother with stuff like grammar and spelling.)


Ah, abuse.

Math is singular, as is Moose, or to make it relevant to this newsgroup:
Code. When someone refers to "the software codes" one generally realizes
it is a clueles newbie talking. Code is the sum of all the lines
written, there is no plural of code.

As for speaking properly, there are rules in the language that govern
how words should be spoken. For instance, "later" and "latter". a vowel
one consonant away from a letter makes it sound like Fonzie's "Ay"
(ape), but two away makes it sound like "ah" (car). So how do you say
"tomato"? It is clearly t-O (oh!)-m-A(Ay!)-to, not t-O-mah-to.

Also, there is no F in think.

Silly English Kuh-nig-its.

--
Mabden
Nov 14 '05 #13

P: n/a
"Mabden" <mabden@sbc_global.net> writes:

Math is singular, as is Moose, or to make it relevant to this newsgroup:
Code. When someone refers to "the software codes" one generally realizes
it is a clueles newbie talking. Code is the sum of all the lines
written, there is no plural of code.
The choice of 'math' over 'maths' is very much a regional choice.
Preaching on which is 'correct' is incorrect.
The OED provides 3 definitions for 'math':

1. A mowing; the action or work of mowing; that which may be or has been
mowed; the portion of a crop that has been mowed.

2. In South Asia: a monastery, esp. one for celibate Hindu mendicants.

3. N. Amer. colloq. Mathematics (esp. as a subject of study at school or
college). Cf. MATHS n. (the usual British colloquial abbreviation).

Australians invariably choose 'maths' as a contraction of mathematics.
Also, there is no F in think.


There is no P in swimming.

__________________________________________________ ____________________________
Dr Chris McDonald E: ch***@csse.uwa.edu.au
Computer Science & Software Engineering W: http://www.csse.uwa.edu.au/~chris
The University of Western Australia, M002 T: +618 6488 2533
Crawley, Western Australia, 6009 F: +618 6488 1089
Nov 14 '05 #14

P: n/a
Chris McDonald wrote:
There is no P in swimming.


Obviously, you've never been to my local community swimming pool!

Thanks for the straight line!
Nov 14 '05 #15

P: n/a
> Benson-Manica <at***@nospam.cyberspace.org> wrote:
Probably from the same one I'm from, where the subject is nearly
universally referred to as "math". While the Queen might disagree,
that's the way it is.
While I'm sorry for you, the Rest of the World can't be held responsible
for the USA's inability to even write english, let alone speak it... :-)


Oh, they are from the USA...
The only logical solution would have been that they are from
Australia, talking about a continent -- but, as someone else
pointed out, people in Australia know about maths :-)
I would like to recall the fact that there also is Canada on
the same continent as the USA even if this comes as a
surprise. Maybe we can also get a Canadian opinion on this
topic...
[snip] But then, the US was mostly colonised by ethnic cleansing
of one sort or another, so its unfair to also expect them to bother with
stuff like grammar and spelling.)


Well, in the case of Mabden:
Better leave his grandmothers alone and do not admit
to be a witch or he might misunderstand you ;-)
Cheers,
Michael

Nov 14 '05 #16

P: n/a
On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 23:17:52 GMT, in comp.lang.c , "Mabden"
<mabden@sbc_global.net> wrote:
Ah, abuse.
nope. Humour. Mind you, since you can't even spell the word..... :-)
Math is singular,
Sure. Thats my point. Mathematics isn't.
As for speaking properly, there are rules in the language that govern
how words should be spoken.
Mhm.
For instance, "later" and "latter". a vowel
one consonant away from a letter makes it sound like Fonzie's "Ay"
(ape), but two away makes it sound like "ah" (car).
Consonant. From. Letter. It. One. All of these break the above rule....
whoops.
Of do you pronounce them "Cone-sone ay-nt, Fr-oh-m, lee-teer, aye-t,
oe-ne"?
So how do you say
"tomato"? It is clearly t-O (oh!)-m-A(Ay!)-to, not t-O-mah-to.
Only to the ignorant. :-)
Also, there is no F in think.


Ah dinnae ken whit yer babblin aboot, so why disnae ye hadawaeanshite, ye
great ploater?

--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt>
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Nov 14 '05 #17

P: n/a
"Michael Mair" <ma********************@ians.uni-stuttgart.de> wrote in
message news:ck**********@infosun2.rus.uni-stuttgart.de...
Benson-Manica <at***@nospam.cyberspace.org> wrote:
Probably from the same one I'm from, where the subject is nearly
universally referred to as "math". While the Queen might disagree,
that's the way it is.
While I'm sorry for you, the Rest of the World can't be held responsible for the USA's inability to even write english, let alone speak it... :-)
Oh, they are from the USA...
The only logical solution would have been that they are from
Australia, talking about a continent -- but, as someone else
pointed out, people in Australia know about maths :-)
I would like to recall the fact that there also is Canada on
the same continent as the USA even if this comes as a
surprise. Maybe we can also get a Canadian opinion on this
topic...
[snip]
But then, the US was mostly colonised by ethnic cleansing
of one sort or another, so its unfair to also expect them to bother
with stuff like grammar and spelling.)


No snipping, since it is quite fragmented already. My Canadian opionion
is that we call the Math. No plural. Sorry if I'm such an asshole that I
sound American ;-) BTW, we share a continent, hence my use of the term,
instead of country.

So, are you saying that Australia has only its native peoples?

Or that London is full of English people (what was your dinner tonight,
a curry)?

Well, in the case of Mabden:
Better leave his grandmothers alone and do not admit
to be a witch or he might misunderstand you ;-)


What the hell does the grandmother / witch stuff mean??? Am I offended
or just stupid? I honestly DO misunderstand.

You seem to think that the people who have come to the USA are lesser
people than you yourself. I detect a bias for the "English" in you. You
seem to classify people as "English" and "Ethnic", and you seem to
believe that the "Ethnic" people are a sub-class of people. Apparently
in your world, "those people" can't write or spell. You seem to think
they are not really humans but animals who could better themselves, if
only they still allowed you to whip some sense into them.

--
Mabden


Nov 14 '05 #18

P: n/a
"Mark McIntyre" <ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:49********************************@4ax.com...
On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 23:17:52 GMT, in comp.lang.c , "Mabden"
<mabden@sbc_global.net> wrote:
Ah, abuse.
nope. Humour. Mind you, since you can't even spell the word..... :-)


???

You mean because Americans spell "color" that way? You don't know
anything about me or how I spell anything.
Math is singular,


Sure. Thats my point. Mathematics isn't.


Yes it is. Mathematics is one concept. You wouldn't say, "Those
mathematics..." as if it were many things. "I was learning those
mathematics the other day...", "I teach those mathematics to the
kids..."
Even in YOUR bass-ackward country they don't do that, do they?
As for speaking properly, there are rules in the language that govern
how words should be spoken.

For instance, "later" and "latter". a vowel
one consonant away from a letter makes it sound like Fonzie's "Ay"
(ape), but two away makes it sound like "ah" (car).


Consonant. From. Letter. It. One. All of these break the above

rule.... whoops.
Of do you pronounce them "Cone-sone ay-nt, Fr-oh-m, lee-teer, aye-t,
oe-ne"?

"Consonant" and "One" you got me on (Doh!). "From" has no other vowel,
neither do the others. You obviously don't understan how English works,
or my explanation of how it works if you think "Letter" should be
"Leeter". The double consonant makes it a soft e, not a hard e.

So how do you say
"tomato"? It is clearly t-O (oh!)-m-A(Ay!)-to, not t-O-mah-to.


Only to the ignorant. :-)


:-P

Also, there is no F in think.


Ah dinnae ken whit yer babblin aboot, so why disnae ye hadawaeanshite,

ye great ploater?


Ah, more abuse.

And it's Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, not Bollocks-naise, you damn Limey
Bastards!!! ;-)

--
Mabden
Nov 14 '05 #19

P: n/a
Mabden <mabden@sbc_global.net> scribbled the following:
"Mark McIntyre" <ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:49********************************@4ax.com...
Ah dinnae ken whit yer babblin aboot, so why disnae ye hadawaeanshite, ye
great ploater?

Ah, more abuse. And it's Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, not Bollocks-naise, you damn Limey
Bastards!!! ;-)


Does "Limey" mean "Englishman" or "Briton"? It's one or the other, but
I have never found out which. If it's "Englishman" then Mabden's
accusation is wrong, as I think Mark is Scottish.

--
/-- Joona Palaste (pa*****@cc.helsinki.fi) ------------- Finland --------\
\-- http://www.helsinki.fi/~palaste --------------------- rules! --------/
"I am lying."
- Anon
Nov 14 '05 #20

P: n/a
"Joona I Palaste" <pa*****@cc.helsinki.fi> wrote in message
news:ck**********@oravannahka.helsinki.fi...
Mabden <mabden@sbc_global.net> scribbled the following:
"Mark McIntyre" <ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:49********************************@4ax.com...
Ah dinnae ken whit yer babblin aboot, so why disnae ye
hadawaeanshite, ye
great ploater?

What the Hell is a ploater? Who ploates? Why is it bad to ploat? Can I
ploat with a friend? Is it just as bad in a hot tub?
And it's Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, not Bollocks-naise, you damn Limey Bastards!!! ;-)
Does "Limey" mean "Englishman" or "Briton"?


"Well, obviously it's not meant to be taken literally." It refers to any
eaters of lime or lime juice.
Historically, it was the British Fleet, since they needed a way to stave
off scurvey and limes were the most long-lived and condensed way to
transport vitamin (that's v-eye-tim-in, not vit-e-min, you limey
bastard) C.

I don't know what regions / countries comprised the British fleet, but I
do know they were ALL limey bastards.

It's one or the other, but
I have never found out which. If it's "Englishman" then Mabden's
accusation is wrong, as I think Mark is Scottish.


I think you just explained a lot. I apologize for arguing with the
mentally handicapped. Had I realized it was a Scot, I would of course
given it much more leeway on things like grammar and spelling and
thought and speech and communication and critical thinking and
interaction with others.

Your apology for him is excepted*.

Is there a comp.lang.c.comedy?

--
Mabden

*yes, I know the difference between accepted and excepted.
Nov 14 '05 #21

P: n/a
Mabden wrote:

I think you just explained a lot. I apologize for arguing with the
mentally handicapped. Had I realized it was a Scot, I would of course
given it much more leeway on things like grammar and spelling and
thought and speech and communication and critical thinking and
interaction with others.

Your apology for him is excepted*.

Is there a comp.lang.c.comedy?


You must be a teenager?

--
Thomas.

Nov 14 '05 #22

P: n/a
"Thomas Stegen" <th***********@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:2s*************@uni-berlin.de...
Mabden wrote:

I think you just explained a lot. I apologize for arguing with the
mentally handicapped. Had I realized it was a Scot, I would of course given it much more leeway on things like grammar and spelling and
thought and speech and communication and critical thinking and
interaction with others.

Your apology for him is excepted*.

Is there a comp.lang.c.comedy?


You must be a teenager?


I hope to get my pubes soon.

Does that excite you?
Nov 14 '05 #23

P: n/a
Mabden wrote:
"Thomas Stegen" <th***********@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:2s*************@uni-berlin.de...
Mabden wrote:
I think you just explained a lot. I apologize for arguing with the
mentally handicapped. Had I realized it was a Scot, I would of
course
given it much more leeway on things like grammar and spelling and
thought and speech and communication and critical thinking and
interaction with others.

Your apology for him is excepted*.

Is there a comp.lang.c.comedy?
You must be a teenager?

I hope to get my pubes soon.


So not a teenager then.

Does that excite you?


Do you want it to excite me? For the record, no it does not.

Good bye.

--
Thomas.
Nov 14 '05 #24

P: n/a
"Mabden" <mabden@sbc_global.net> wrote:
And it's Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, not Bollocks-naise, you damn Limey
Bastards!!! ;-)


Ah. Another barbarian.

It's "ragł alla Bolognese", you lack-tongue!

Richard
Nov 14 '05 #25

P: n/a


Mabden wrote:
"Michael Mair" <ma********************@ians.uni-stuttgart.de> wrote in
message news:ck**********@infosun2.rus.uni-stuttgart.de...
Benson-Manica <at***@nospam.cyberspace.org> wrote:

Probably from the same one I'm from, where the subject is nearly
universally referred to as "math". While the Queen might disagree,
that's the way it is.

While I'm sorry for you, the Rest of the World can't be held
responsible
for the USA's inability to even write english, let alone speak it...
:-)
Oh, they are from the USA...
The only logical solution would have been that they are from
Australia, talking about a continent -- but, as someone else
pointed out, people in Australia know about maths :-)
I would like to recall the fact that there also is Canada on
the same continent as the USA even if this comes as a
surprise. Maybe we can also get a Canadian opinion on this
topic...
[snip]
But then, the US was mostly colonised by ethnic cleansing
of one sort or another, so its unfair to also expect them to bother
with
stuff like grammar and spelling.)


No snipping, since it is quite fragmented already. My Canadian opionion
is that we call the Math. No plural. Sorry if I'm such an asshole that I
sound American ;-) BTW, we share a continent, hence my use of the term,
instead of country.


IMO it does not really matter in a nonsense-thread but
I will oblige for now...

The thing with the Canadians certainly backfired *g*
About the shared continent: As there are English-speaking people
on more than one continent, it was -- at least to me -- not clear
which continent you were talking about.

So, are you saying that Australia has only its native peoples?
???

Or that London is full of English people (what was your dinner tonight,
a curry)?
Tonight is still a good deal in the future. Remember, we have an
eastward-rotating globe...

Well, in the case of Mabden:
Better leave his grandmothers alone and do not admit
to be a witch or he might misunderstand you ;-)


What the hell does the grandmother / witch stuff mean??? Am I offended
or just stupid? I honestly DO misunderstand.


Figure it out. It was meant to be witty and probably
offensive to you.

You seem to think that the people who have come to the USA are lesser
people than you yourself. I detect a bias for the "English" in you. You
seem to classify people as "English" and "Ethnic", and you seem to
believe that the "Ethnic" people are a sub-class of people. Apparently
in your world, "those people" can't write or spell. You seem to think
they are not really humans but animals who could better themselves, if
only they still allowed you to whip some sense into them.


Actually, I do not care where you are from. I have friends in the
US, in Canada, Northern Ireland, England and know some people from
Australia I like. If I have an opinion, it is based on the people
I know and the things I have experienced or at least on facts from
reliable sources (that is: Not ramblings from the Web or the media).

I certainly do not whip sense into anyone and would oppose such an
act if I were present when someone else tried to do this.

As for alphabetization/alphabetisation and cultivatedness:
I do not think that there is as much of a divide as some people
seem to believe.

And finally: I do not think any single person "lesser than me myself".
--Michael

Nov 14 '05 #26

P: n/a
Michael Mair wrote:
Benson-Manica <at***@nospam.cyberspace.org> wrote:
Probably from the same one I'm from, where the subject is nearly
universally referred to as "math". While the Queen might disagree,
that's the way it is.


Oh, they are from the USA...
The only logical solution would have been that they are from
Australia, talking about a continent -- but, as someone else
pointed out, people in Australia know about maths :-)
I would like to recall the fact that there also is Canada on
the same continent as the USA even if this comes as a
surprise. Maybe we can also get a Canadian opinion on this
topic...


Expatriate, but I go to a math class to study maths.

--
Chuck F (cb********@yahoo.com) (cb********@worldnet.att.net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net> USE worldnet address!

Nov 14 '05 #27

P: n/a
Hiho,

CBFalconer wrote:
Michael Mair wrote:
Benson-Manica <at***@nospam.cyberspace.org> wrote:

Probably from the same one I'm from, where the subject is nearly
universally referred to as "math". While the Queen might disagree,
that's the way it is.


Oh, they are from the USA...
The only logical solution would have been that they are from
Australia, talking about a continent -- but, as someone else
pointed out, people in Australia know about maths :-)
I would like to recall the fact that there also is Canada on
the same continent as the USA even if this comes as a
surprise. Maybe we can also get a Canadian opinion on this
topic...


Expatriate, but I go to a math class to study maths.


Thank you!
Now, I finally know for sure :-)

Apart from that, I still think of mowing when hearing math...
Cheers
Michael

Nov 14 '05 #28

P: n/a
>>So how do you say
"tomato"? It is clearly t-O (oh!)-m-A(Ay!)-to, not t-O-mah-to.

Only to the ignorant. :-)


He clearly doesn't know the famous saying: "Tomayto, Tomahto..."
Nov 14 '05 #29

P: n/a
On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 08:50:00 GMT, in comp.lang.c , "Mabden"
<mabden@sbc_global.net> wrote:
"Mark McIntyre" <ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:49********************************@4ax.com.. .
On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 23:17:52 GMT, in comp.lang.c , "Mabden"
<mabden@sbc_global.net> wrote:
Sure. Thats my point. Mathematics isn't.


Yes it is. Mathematics is one concept.


FCOL.

--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt>
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Nov 14 '05 #30

P: n/a
On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 11:37:31 GMT, in comp.lang.c , CBFalconer
<cb********@yahoo.com> wrote:
Michael Mair wrote:
surprise. Maybe we can also get a Canadian opinion on this
topic...


Expatriate, but I go to a math class to study maths.


Now isn't that *exactly* like canadians to be neither one ner the other...
gd&r

--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt>
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Nov 14 '05 #31

P: n/a
On 7 Oct 2004 09:00:42 GMT, in comp.lang.c , Joona I Palaste
<pa*****@cc.helsinki.fi> wrote:
Mabden <mabden@sbc_global.net> scribbled the following:
"Mark McIntyre" <ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:49********************************@4ax.com...
Ah dinnae ken whit yer babblin aboot, so why disnae ye hadawaeanshite,

ye
great ploater?

Ah, more abuse.

And it's Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, not Bollocks-naise, you damn Limey
Bastards!!! ;-)


Does "Limey" mean "Englishman" or "Briton"? It's one or the other, but
I have never found out which. If it's "Englishman" then Mabden's
accusation is wrong, as I think Mark is Scottish.


Limey applies to the British (something to do with the sailors eating limes
to stave off scurvy). However since I've killfiled Mabden its largely
immaterial. And yes, I'm Scots.

--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt>
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Nov 14 '05 #32

P: n/a
In article <1p********************************@4ax.com>,
Mark McIntyre <ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote:
On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 11:37:31 GMT, in comp.lang.c , CBFalconer
<cb********@yahoo.com> wrote:
Michael Mair wrote:
surprise. Maybe we can also get a Canadian opinion on this
topic...


Expatriate, but I go to a math class to study maths.


Now isn't that *exactly* like canadians to be neither one ner the other...
gd&r


Yep.
Well, except when it isn't.
dave

--
Dave Vandervies dj******@csclub.uwaterloo.ca
I don't recall the dog. If it was a big nasty one that growled, I owe that
programmer a debt of gratitude. After all, nothing in the Standard says that
undefined behaviour has to be a Bad Thing. --Richard Heathfield in CLC
Nov 14 '05 #33

P: n/a
Michael Mair wrote:

CBFalconer wrote:
Michael Mair wrote:
Benson-Manica <at***@nospam.cyberspace.org> wrote:
Probably from the same one I'm from, where the subject is nearly
universally referred to as "math". While the Queen might disagree,
that's the way it is.
Part of the English-speaking world call it "math", the other
part call it "maths". What's all the fuss?
Also, probably most of the rest of the world call it "math"
because they learn English from American textbooks / tutorials
/ teachers (eg. I've heard Filipinos talk about 'math').
Oh, they are from the USA...
The only logical solution would have been that they are from
Australia
Expatriate, but I go to a math class to study maths.
Thank you!


I went to a maths class to study maths :) (New Zealand)
Unfortunately, my maths teacher had a habit of calling
me 'Math' (short for Matthew, my name when not in my
wolf costume). I don't think the possessive form of that
was ever used though :)
Apart from that, I still think of mowing when hearing math...


Mowing ?!
Nov 14 '05 #34

P: n/a
Mark McIntyre wrote:
<cb********@yahoo.com> wrote:
Michael Mair wrote:

surprise. Maybe we can also get a Canadian opinion on this
topic...


Expatriate, but I go to a math class to study maths.


Now isn't that *exactly* like canadians to be neither one ner the
other...
gd&r


Of mixed blood - Scots, Welsh, Austro-Hungarian, Usanian. What do
you expect? And Canadians, like Pascal, should be capitalized. By
now the family, including in-laws, incorporates Filipino, Japanese,
Italian, Czech, Irish, and who knows what else.

--
Chuck F (cb********@yahoo.com) (cb********@worldnet.att.net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net> USE worldnet address!
Nov 14 '05 #35

P: n/a
"Mabden" <mabden@sbc_global.net> wrote:

Math is singular, as is Moose,
"Maths" isn't a plural as such, it's a contraction of
"Mathematics". Or are you going to tell me that you call
it "Mathematic" ?
or to make it relevant to this newsgroup:
Code. When someone refers to "the software codes" one generally
realizes it is a clueles newbie talking.
Actually I consider it to be a non-English speaker talking
Code is the sum of all the lines written, there is no plural of code.
The plural of code is surely codes (look in the dictionary).
However since code is the sum of all lines written, as you say,
it is a single entity, therefore it is correct to use the singular form.
As for speaking properly, there are rules in the language that govern
how words should be spoken.
Chapter and verse?
There is only the way that people speak it. You can attempt to
search for patterns in this..
For instance, "later" and "latter". a vowel one consonant away
from a letter makes it sound like Fonzie's "Ay" (ape), but two ^^^^^^ ITYM 'another vowel' away makes it sound like "ah" (car).
A common pattern but by no means a hard and fast rule.
Note that according to your description, the vowel
after the consonant is 'short' in both cases, it's the
one before it that changes (from 'long' to 'short').
So how do you say "tomato"?
It is clearly t-O (oh!)-m-A(Ay!)-to, not t-O-mah-to.
By that reasoning, later would have a 'long' e.
And what about every other word that has V-C-V and
is unrelated? (eg from this post: 'every' isn't eee-very).
Also, there is no F in think.


Are you referring to people who mis-pronounce "th" ?
Nov 14 '05 #36

P: n/a
"Old Wolf" <ol*****@inspire.net.nz> wrote in message
news:84**************************@posting.google.c om...
"Mabden" <mabden@sbc_global.net> wrote:

Math is singular, as is Moose,
"Maths" isn't a plural as such, it's a contraction of
"Mathematics". Or are you going to tell me that you call
it "Mathematic" ?

Of course not. Mathematics is also singular, despite the s at the end.
Again, you don't talk about "those mathematics". OK, I have decided to
allow the English to continue to call it "Maths". But only in the
interest of killing this thread. ;-)
or to make it relevant to this newsgroup:
Code. When someone refers to "the software codes" one generally
realizes it is a clueles newbie talking.


Actually I consider it to be a non-English speaker talking


Well, that's a special case. I meant when a newspaper or TV show, both
of whom have editors, make this mistake. Any foreigner may mispronounce
a non-native language. It's when they misuse their own that they should
be considered idiots or newbies (or Scottish, I guess <gd&r>).
Code is the sum of all the lines written, there is no plural of code.
The plural of code is surely codes (look in the dictionary).
If one is dealing with multiple cyphers, you are correct.
However since code is the sum of all lines written, as you say,
it is a single entity, therefore it is correct to use the singular form.

Which is all I said, so why the argument? You can also add an s when you
use the word as a verb, of course. One codes their code.
As for speaking properly, there are rules in the language that
govern how words should be spoken.


Chapter and verse?


Ummm... I leart it in skool!
There is only the way that people speak it. You can attempt to
search for patterns in this..


Now that is just wrong. Or very, very true. Scary!
For instance, "later" and "latter". a vowel one consonant away
from another vowel makes it sound like Fonzie's "Ay" (ape), but two
away makes it sound like "ah" (car). [my quote corrected, thanks]


A common pattern but by no means a hard and fast rule.
Note that according to your description, the vowel
after the consonant is 'short' in both cases, it's the
one before it that changes (from 'long' to 'short').


Huh? Well, of course the one before... Perhaps I was unclear what "it"
was. I meant the first vowel changes, not the second one. I guess I
assumed that was understood.
So how do you say "tomato"?
It is clearly t-O (oh!)-m-A(Ay!)-to, not t-O-mah-to.


By that reasoning, later would have a 'long' e.
And what about every other word that has V-C-V and
is unrelated? (eg from this post: 'every' isn't eee-very).


Yet there's also "Evening". Go figure.
Also, there is no F in think.


Are you referring to people who mis-pronounce "th" ?


Yes, as I was talking to an "England created English" snob. Then I saw
Eastenders on PBS. OMG.

So where would this be ON topic? Because we should stop this thread in
comp.lang.c.

--
Mabden
Nov 14 '05 #37

P: n/a
Mark McIntyre wrote:

Ah dinnae ken whit yer babblin aboot, so why disnae ye hadawaeanshite


"haud yer wheesht", surely?

Allin Cottrell
Nov 14 '05 #38

P: n/a
Hi Old Wolf,

I went to a maths class to study maths :) (New Zealand)
Unfortunately, my maths teacher had a habit of calling
me 'Math' (short for Matthew, my name when not in my
wolf costume). I don't think the possessive form of that
was ever used though :)


*g*

Apart from that, I still think of mowing when hearing math...


Mowing ?!


Umh, yes. Chris McDonald was (somewhere further up) so friendly to
provide definitions from the OED, among them
"1. A mowing; the action or work of mowing; that which may be or has
been mowed; the portion of a crop that has been mowed."

This (and the second definition he provided) is also what I learned as
meaning of "math". As the first has the same meaning as the (southern ?)
German word "Mahd", it certainly stuck. I was completely unaware that
there is the third meaning as contracted version of Mathematics... :-)
So, when Mabden came up with the issue, I looked it up on the web to be
sure, got the "informal American Englisch for Mathematics", and wrote
my provocative answer... :-/
Next time I will certainly look it up somewhere else.
Cheers
Michael

Nov 14 '05 #39

P: n/a
On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 23:50:22 -0400, in comp.lang.c , Allin Cottrell
<co******@wfu.edu> wrote:
Mark McIntyre wrote:

Ah dinnae ken whit yer babblin aboot, so why disnae ye hadawaeanshite


"haud yer wheesht", surely?


indeed, but 30 years south of the border has polluted my mind....
--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt>
Nov 14 '05 #40

This discussion thread is closed

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