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Good shareware compiler for C?

H.
I am a student taking a machine structures class in a university, which
includes learning C. I am looking for a good freeware or shareware
compiler which can be used in a "C only" mode. C++ isn't allowed in
assignments, and I would like the compiler to check for C syntax
instead of C++ syntax. Besides that, ease of use for a beginner and
basic debugging capabilities are important.

Suggestions are welcome.

Jan 18 '07 #1
87 3789
H. a écrit :
I am a student taking a machine structures class in a university, which
includes learning C. I am looking for a good freeware or shareware
compiler which can be used in a "C only" mode. C++ isn't allowed in
assignments, and I would like the compiler to check for C syntax
instead of C++ syntax. Besides that, ease of use for a beginner and
basic debugging capabilities are important.

Suggestions are welcome.
If you use windows you can use my compiler system lcc-win32

http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32

o All windows APIs are supported
o 128 bit integers, 352 bits floating points
o bignums

o IDE + project management and makefile generation
o debugger (windowed)
o ressource editor (graphical dialog box designer)

o profiler
o grep/diff/search/ and many other goodies

http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32
Jan 18 '07 #2
"H." <hb****@gmail.c omwrote in message
news:11******** *************@5 1g2000cwl.googl egroups.com...
>I am a student taking a machine structures class in a university, which
includes learning C. I am looking for a good freeware or shareware
compiler which can be used in a "C only" mode. C++ isn't allowed in
assignments, and I would like the compiler to check for C syntax
instead of C++ syntax. Besides that, ease of use for a beginner and
basic debugging capabilities are important.

Suggestions are welcome.
Suggestions:

a)There are a number of ports of gcc that will work. Other posters will
suggest them, I'm sure.

b)Microsoft's Visual C++ has come way down in price (about $120 now, I
think). This might be an option. It will operate in "C only" mode.

c)If you have a spare PC, you can just download Fedora and set up a Linux
box. gcc is automatically part of that.

d)If you can get an account on a *nix machine somewhere, you could always
use a compiler remotely. This might seem awkward, but with Putty or another
terminal emulator you can edit competently ... it works fine.

By the way, "gcc" is the "GNU Compiler Collection" or the "GNU C Compiler"
(I'm not sure which), but if you search by "gcc home page" you'll find it.
--
David T. Ashley (dt*@e3ft.com)
http://www.e3ft.com (Consulting Home Page)
http://www.dtashley.com (Personal Home Page)
http://gpl.e3ft.com (GPL Publications and Projects)
Jan 18 '07 #3
H. wrote:
I am a student taking a machine structures class in a university, which
includes learning C. I am looking for a good freeware or shareware
compiler which can be used in a "C only" mode. C++ isn't allowed in
assignments, and I would like the compiler to check for C syntax
instead of C++ syntax. Besides that, ease of use for a beginner and
basic debugging capabilities are important.

Suggestions are welcome.
For Windows:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/ex...c/default.aspx

For any platform:
http://www.mingw.org/download.shtml +
http://www.eclipse.org/callisto/downloads.php +
http://download.eclipse.org/tools/cd...to/dist/3.1.1/

Jan 18 '07 #4
"user923005 " <dc*****@connx. comwrote in message
news:11******** **************@ q2g2000cwa.goog legroups.com...
H. wrote:
>I am a student taking a machine structures class in a university, which
includes learning C. I am looking for a good freeware or shareware
compiler which can be used in a "C only" mode. C++ isn't allowed in
assignments, and I would like the compiler to check for C syntax
instead of C++ syntax. Besides that, ease of use for a beginner and
basic debugging capabilities are important.

Suggestions are welcome.

For Windows:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/ex...c/default.aspx
It seems from the Microsoft website that this is a free download (I'm
shocked). Did I get that right?

Also, I'm going to guess that gcc has forced Microsoft to do this. With gcc
available for Windows, it is more than adequate for the instructional needs
of universities, people trying to learn C on their own, and so on. I think
Microsoft has been forced to do this. Am I guessing right?

--
David T. Ashley (dt*@e3ft.com)
http://www.e3ft.com (Consulting Home Page)
http://www.dtashley.com (Personal Home Page)
http://gpl.e3ft.com (GPL Publications and Projects)
Jan 18 '07 #5

"David T. Ashley" <dt*@e3ft.comwr ote in message
news:7Y******** *************** *******@giganew s.com...
b)Microsoft's Visual C++ has come way down in price (about $120 now, I
think). This might be an option. It will operate in "C only" mode.
The learning edition of VC is free which compiles C89 code.

If you want to be able to program C99 too, lcc-win32 goes a long way if not
all the way and gcc is pretty decent too
Jan 18 '07 #6
[Drifting off-topic...]

In article <7Y************ *************** ***@giganews.co m>,
David T. Ashley <dt*@e3ft.comwr ote:
>b)Microsoft' s Visual C++ has come way down in price (about $120 now, I
think). This might be an option. It will operate in "C only" mode.
Microsoft will even let you use it without charging you for it, if you
choose the right version.
For somebody who's already running Windows and just trying to get started
with a C compiler, this is probably the best choice, though it does take
a little bit of Clue to bludgeon VC++ into submission if you want it to
act like a conforming C compiler.

>c)If you have a spare PC, you can just download Fedora and set up a Linux
box. gcc is automatically part of that.
I believe the usual Linux recommendation is Ubuntu these days.
(Personally, I'd go with one of the BSDs, but that might be a bit on the
new-user-unfriendly side for somebody who's just trying to get started
with C.)

If the OP doesn't mind installing some kind of virtualization software
(also available at no cost if you choose the right package and version),
this can even be done without a spare machine. But that's probably not
worth the effort unless you're looking for more than just a C compiler.

>d)If you can get an account on a *nix machine somewhere, you could always
use a compiler remotely. This might seem awkward, but with Putty or another
terminal emulator you can edit competently ... it works fine.
Perhaps I'm just old-fashioned, but it seems to me that the OP's school
should have a Unix machine in a closet somewhere for exactly this purpose.
It's also worth checking whether the school has suitable software
available to students at no cost.
See also:
http://cpax.org.uk/prg/portable/c/re...#FreeCompilers
dave

--
Dave Vandervies dj******@csclub .uwaterloo.ca
Thankfully that's beyond the capacities of most spammers
(else they'd be smart enough not to be spammers?).
--Giles Malet in uw.mfcf.gripe
Jan 18 '07 #7

"H." <hb****@gmail.c omwrote in message
news:11******** *************@5 1g2000cwl.googl egroups.com...
I am a student taking a machine structures class in a university, which
includes learning C. I am looking for a good freeware or shareware
compiler which can be used in a "C only" mode. C++ isn't allowed in
assignments, and I would like the compiler to check for C syntax
instead of C++ syntax. Besides that, ease of use for a beginner and
basic debugging capabilities are important.

Suggestions are welcome.
Assuming you want to run on Windows there are lots of choices. Not sure how
they each police C against C++ but the all work.
Personally I tend to use MINGW from www.mingw.org. Its a bit fiddly to get
installed, but its a native "C" on Windows. Its widely used and well
supported. Others are Watcom, www.openwatcom.org, VisualStudio C Express
http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/default.aspx .

I think most of these will assume files of filetype "C" are C not C++ but
how much checking they do I am not sure. In some ways the last two are
easier to use for a move as they include Integrated Development
Environments. If you are going to develop Windows programs then I would
certainly suggest the latter...

Dave.
Jan 18 '07 #8

"David T. Ashley" <dt*@e3ft.comwr ote in message
news:gd******** *************** *******@giganew s.com...
"user923005 " <dc*****@connx. comwrote in message
news:11******** **************@ q2g2000cwa.goog legroups.com...
H. wrote:
I am a student taking a machine structures class in a university, which
includes learning C. I am looking for a good freeware or shareware
compiler which can be used in a "C only" mode. C++ isn't allowed in
assignments, and I would like the compiler to check for C syntax
instead of C++ syntax. Besides that, ease of use for a beginner and
basic debugging capabilities are important.

Suggestions are welcome.
For Windows:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/ex...c/default.aspx

It seems from the Microsoft website that this is a free download (I'm
shocked). Did I get that right?
Yes its right. They have always had student editions that were cheap...
Also, I'm going to guess that gcc has forced Microsoft to do this. With
gcc
available for Windows, it is more than adequate for the instructional
needs
of universities, people trying to learn C on their own, and so on. I
think
Microsoft has been forced to do this. Am I guessing right?
I don't think so as they have done the same for all developer products. C#,
VB and WebDeveloper are also free....
--
David T. Ashley (dt*@e3ft.com)
http://www.e3ft.com (Consulting Home Page)
http://www.dtashley.com (Personal Home Page)
http://gpl.e3ft.com (GPL Publications and Projects)


Jan 18 '07 #9
H.
If you use windows you can use my compiler system lcc-win32
http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32
I do use Windows, and this looks great. One problem though is that when
I click on "lcc-win32" which I think should open an executable, what
happens instead is that the URL changes to:
http://www.q-software-solutions.de/downloaders/get_name
which lists some C books for purchase.
At this page, after searching, I found a "take me to the downloads"
link. So the problem is really a UI one. Anyway, thanks.

Jan 18 '07 #10

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