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Database folder

Hi,

What is best folder to put database (location of database)? This is because
when administrator restricts user rights to read (read and execute), and
doesn't give permissions to write in C: disk (only to My documents is write
allowed)?
What to do in this case, shall I store database to My Documents location of
user, or to Shared Documents folder? Or there is some other way (work
around) to this problem?
What is best practice for this?
Database is MS Access.

Thanks,
John
Jan 28 '06 #1
2 1274
On Sat, 28 Jan 2006 15:31:34 +0100, "John" <Jo*****@hotmail.com>
wrote:
Hi,

What is best folder to put database (location of database)? This is because
when administrator restricts user rights to read (read and execute), and
doesn't give permissions to write in C: disk (only to My documents is write
allowed)?
What to do in this case, shall I store database to My Documents location of
user, or to Shared Documents folder? Or there is some other way (work
around) to this problem?
What is best practice for this?


Full create/read/write/delete access is necessary if you're going to
be updating the database. There is no restriction on where the
database can be kept - My Documents would be fine.

If this database is to be shared among multiple users, you really
should split it using the Database Splitter Wizard. Each user should
have their own copy of the "frontend" ( with the forms, queries,
reports etc.) all linked to a shared backend, which must be on a
folder on the network, available with full rights to all users. They
don't need privileges on the entire disk, but your administrator
should realize that specific folders may need special permissions.

John W. Vinson[MVP]
Jan 28 '06 #2
To add to John's comments.

Where does the data need to live?

If it is to live with the current user, then "My Documents" may be fine
(until the user does housekeeping). It would be better in that case to use
isolated storeage.

If the data is to live on the pc for mutiple users, then the data really
should be stored in a common directory on the pc. Usually this would be a
sub directory of the application. However, admins may restrict write access
to the "program files" tree so you may need to have an alternate path
defined.

If the data is to be shared by multiple users on multiple pc's then the data
needs to be stored in a centeral location so that all may access it.

In either case, you system requirements should include potential disk
utilization and access to the directory. Once stated, the netadmins only
need to comply with the requirements. If you make sure they are part of the
desicsion process, typically, they are receptive to relaxing security for
your application.

"John Vinson" <jvinson@STOP_SPAM.WysardOfInfo.com> wrote in message
news:99********************************@4ax.com...
On Sat, 28 Jan 2006 15:31:34 +0100, "John" <Jo*****@hotmail.com>
wrote:
Hi,

What is best folder to put database (location of database)? This is
because
when administrator restricts user rights to read (read and execute), and
doesn't give permissions to write in C: disk (only to My documents is
write
allowed)?
What to do in this case, shall I store database to My Documents location
of
user, or to Shared Documents folder? Or there is some other way (work
around) to this problem?
What is best practice for this?


Full create/read/write/delete access is necessary if you're going to
be updating the database. There is no restriction on where the
database can be kept - My Documents would be fine.

If this database is to be shared among multiple users, you really
should split it using the Database Splitter Wizard. Each user should
have their own copy of the "frontend" ( with the forms, queries,
reports etc.) all linked to a shared backend, which must be on a
folder on the network, available with full rights to all users. They
don't need privileges on the entire disk, but your administrator
should realize that specific folders may need special permissions.

John W. Vinson[MVP]

Jan 30 '06 #3

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